Bristol-Myers Squibb turns to an AI startup to accelerate cancer research

first_img Bristol-Myers Squibb turns to an AI startup to accelerate cancer research [email protected] What’s included? Log In | Learn More Unlock this article by subscribing to STAT+ and enjoy your first 30 days free! GET STARTED Daily reporting and analysis The most comprehensive industry coverage from a powerhouse team of reporters Subscriber-only newsletters Daily newsletters to brief you on the most important industry news of the day STAT+ Conversations Weekly opportunities to engage with our reporters and leading industry experts in live video conversations Exclusive industry events Premium access to subscriber-only networking events around the country The best reporters in the industry The most trusted and well-connected newsroom in the health care industry And much more Exclusive interviews with industry leaders, profiles, and premium tools, like our CRISPR Trackr. What is it? GET STARTED By Casey Ross March 28, 2019 Reprints @caseymross STAT+ is STAT’s premium subscription service for in-depth biotech, pharma, policy, and life science coverage and analysis. Our award-winning team covers news on Wall Street, policy developments in Washington, early science breakthroughs and clinical trial results, and health care disruption in Silicon Valley and beyond. National Technology Correspondent Casey covers the use of artificial intelligence in medicine and its underlying questions of safety, fairness, and privacy. He is the co-author of the newsletter STAT Health Tech. Bristol-Myers Squibb (BMY), seeking to re-energize its cancer pipeline, is turning to an artificial intelligence startup for help, inking a deal to use the firm’s analytical tools and “real-world” patient data to better target and accelerate clinical trials.The deal with Concerto HealthAI, a Boston-based firm backed by the $1 billion SymphonyAI fund, is an effort to infuse real-world evidence from medical practices across the U.S. into Bristol’s research. Concerto uses data from CancerLinQ, a national repository of information on cancer patients, to search for patterns that may inform drug development. Casey Ross Pharma About the Author Reprints Tags Artificial IntelligenceBostoncancerdrug developmentSTAT+last_img read more

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Auction of 3,000 items from The Shelbourne and Clery’s in Laois

first_img Community TAGSHeritage at KillenardKillenardVictor Mee Auctions By David Power – 10th March 2018 RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Laois County Council team up with top chef for online demonstration on tips for reducing food waste Pinterest Previous articleFr Paddy: Lent – a time to pauseNext articleRemember the Game: Laois’s last trip across the Irish Sea in 1993 David PowerA journalist for over 20 years, David has worked for a number of regional titles both as journalist and editor. From Tullamore he also works as a content editor for Independent.ie. His heroes include Shane Lowry, Seamus Darby and Johnny Flaherty Twitter Council Home News Business Auction of 3,000 items from The Shelbourne and Clery’s in Laois NewsBusiness Laois County Council create ‘bigger and better’ disability parking spaces to replace ones occupied for outdoor dining WhatsApp Twitter Auction of 3,000 items from The Shelbourne and Clery’s in Laois Facebook Facebook Ten Laois based players named on Leinster rugby U-18 girls squad Pinterest Rugby WhatsApp An auction will take place in Killenard on Monday of items from a renowned hotel and nightclub in Dublin.The auction was postponed due to snow and will now take place next week.The auctioneers handling the sale have described it as the most important 3,000 piece interiors sale in Ireland this yearThe auction will include a sale of items from Howl at the Moon, The Shelbourne, The Residence Club and Clerys at the Heritage Hotel, Killenard, Co Laois, on Monday and Tuesday from 10am.Grand pianoMonday’s auction will include a life-size bronze statue, an ebonised grand piano and a unique collection of Irish whiskey.Tuesday’s auction will feature the entire contents of the renowned private members club Residence to include bars, mirrors, glassware and furniture and the Clerys collection that contains up to 300 items of factual, memorabilia and photographic interest.The sale will conducted by Cavan’s Victor Mee Auctions in partnership with Niall Mullen and includes a two-metre square French chandelier, a 2.5 metre bronze sculpture by Sandra Bell, originally purchased by Tony Ryan, and the bronze installation that once graced the front of the former Microsoft building in Dublin.For full details and online catalogue see www.victormeeauctions.ie.SEE ALSO – Details on first Electric Picnic line up announcement confirmedlast_img read more

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Deaths in Laois – Thursday, July 18, 2019

first_imgHome Deaths Deaths in Laois – Thursday, July 18, 2019 Deaths Deaths in Laois – Thursday, July 18, 2019 Pinterest Pinterest Twitter WhatsApp Twitter 2020 U-15 ‘B’ glory for Ballyroan-Abbey following six point win over Killeshin Previous articleComerford and Delaney fire The Harps to Division 5 football crownNext articleJOB VACANCY: Backup Power Solutions seeking to hire electricians and electrical engineers Alan HartnettStradbally native Alan Hartnett is a graduate of Knockbeg College who has worked in the local and national media since 2008. Alan has a BA in Economics, Politics and Law and an MA in Journalism from DCU. His happiest moment was when Jody Dillon scored THAT goal in the Laois senior football final in 2016. Here are all of Wednesday’s Laois GAA results Facebook GAA center_img Facebook By Alan Hartnett – 18th July 2019 Katie LoobyGarrylawn, Crosspatrick, Kilkenny / Laois / TipperaryKatie Looby, Garrylawn, Crosspatrick, Via Thurles, Co. Kilkenny. July 13th 2019. Peacefully in the wonderful care of The Sacred Heart Nursing Home, Crosspartick, in her 101st year. Sadly mourned by Michael and Christina Looby (Coolkerry, Rathdowney) and her dear friend Mary Harte, neighbours and friends.Reposing at O’ Sullivan’s funeral home, Rathdowney on Monday evening from 6pm with rosary at 8pm. Funeral Mass on Tuesday at 12noon in The Church Of The Immaculate Conception, Galmoy followed by burial in the adjoining Cemetery.“May Her Gentle Soul Rest In Peace”SEE ALSO – Deaths in Laois – Wednesday, July 17, 2019 RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Kelly and Farrell lead the way as St Joseph’s claim 2020 U-15 glory TAGSDeaths in Laois GAA Below are the recent deaths in Laois.Ar Dheis De go raibh a anam.Tom CostelloPortlaoise Road, Mountrath, LaoisTom Costello, Portlaoise Road, Mountrath, died peacefully 16th of July at The Regional Hospital, Portlaoise, surrounded by his loving family. Retired staff officer Laois County Council. Beloved husband of Mary (nee Fitzgerald) adored father of Maria. Deeply regretted by his loving wife, daughter, son-in-law Noel Brady (Mullingar) grandsons Eoin and Conall, brothers, nephew Michael, brothers-in-law, sisters-in-law, neighbours, relatives, former work colleagues and friends.R.I.P.Reposing at his home on Thursday from 5 o’clock. Recital of the Rosary at 8 o’clock. Funeral arriving to St. Fintan’s Church, Mountrath, for 11 o’clock Requiem Mass on Friday morning. Burial afterwards in St. Fintan’s Cemetery. House private, please, on Friday morning.Damien WestonClonaghadoo, Geashill, Offaly / Geashill, LaoisPeacefully surrounded by his loving family at the Regional Hospital Portlaoise. Loving son of P. J. and Marie and dear brother of Barry, Grace, Therese and Padraig. Sadly missed by his loving parents, brothers, sisters, grandmothers Betty Weston and Elizabeth Dunne, nephew A. J., uncles, aunts, cousins, extended family, neighbours and friends.Rest In Peace.Reposing at the family residence (eircode R35 XN59) on Wednesday from 3pm with Rosary at 8pm. Removal on Thursday at 10:30am arriving St Mary’s Church, Clonaghadoo for Requiem Mass at 11am. Interment afterwards in St Mary’s Cemetery, Clonaghadoo. House Private On Thursday Morning Please.Family Flowers Only Please.Matthew (Matt) FoyleAghaboe, Ballacolla, LaoisMatthew (Matt) Foyle, Ballacolla, Portlaoise, Co. Laois. (Eircode R32 X952). Died 15th. July 2019 (peacefully) at his home, surrounded by his loving family. Deeply regretted and will be sadly missed by his loving wife Brigid, sons Matt, Walter and John, daughters Catherine, Maria, Breda and Dolores, daughters in law, sons in law, grandchildren, great-grandchildren, sister in law Maureen, extended family,relatives, neighbours and friends.“May Matthew Rest In Peace”Reposing at his home in Aghaboe this Monday evening (July 15th.) from 6 o’c with Rosary in the house at 9 o’c and on Tuesday afternoon fron 2 o’c with removal at 7 o’c to St. Canice’s Church, Clough (Eircode R32 K003) arriving 7.30 o’c. Requiem Mass on Wednesday morning (July 17th.) at 11 o’c with burial immediately afterwards in the local cemetery. Family flowers only please. Donations if desired to The Irish Cancer Society. Donation box in peace at house and church. GAA WhatsApplast_img read more

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Equity funds post mixed results in October: Morningstar

IE Staff Canadian fund sales exceeded $23B in February Facebook LinkedIn Twitter Related news Keywords Fund performanceCompanies Morningstar Research Inc. Sector Watch: Dodging potholes on the home front Sector Watch: Performance at home and beyond Equity funds in Canada showed mixed results in October, with those that target Asian and European markets posting positive returns while U.S. and Japanese equity funds were in the red. Meanwhile, those that focus on Canadian equities offered modest gains, according to preliminary performance numbers released today by Morningstar Canada. The best performer among the 42 Morningstar Canada fund indices was the one that tracks the greater China equity category, which followed up its impressive 6.2% increase in September with a 5.4% increase last month. “A series of recent small stimulus steps taken by the Chinese government, as well as talk of further and bigger stimulus measures in advance of China’s leadership change on Nov. 8, helped fuel this rally,” said Morningstar fund analyst Joanne Xiao. In second place, the European equity fund index posted its third consecutive monthly increase, rising 2.6%, while the fund indices that track the international equity, Asia Pacific equity, and emerging markets equity also did well with increases of 1.9%, 1.6%, and 1.5% for the month, respectively. “Quantitative easing remained the top story in October, and European equities continued to rally on the back of the European Central Bank’s bond-buying program,” Xiao said. In the United States, the S&P 500 Index had one of the worst performances among major markets with a 1.9% loss in October, but funds in the U.S. equity category benefited from the depreciation of the Canadian dollar versus its U.S. counterpart, which mitigated the losses. The U.S. equity fund index decreased by 1.3% for the month, which was the second-worst return of all fund indices. Other fund indices that fell included Japanese equity and U.S. small/mid cap equity, with decreases of 0.2% and 0.9%, respectively. Also at the bottom of the table were four sector-specific fund indices: natural resources equity (-0.6%), real estate equity (-0.9%), precious metals equity (-0.9%), and health care equity (-2.1%). Morningstar Canada’s five domestic equity fund indices all had positive results last month, though all ranked in the middle of the pack overall. The Canadian equity fund index had the best return with a 1.3% increase, while Canadian focused equity, Canadian dividend & income equity, and Canadian small/mid cap equity posted increases of 1.1%, 0.9%, and 0.3%, respectively. Bringing up the rear, the Canadian focused small/mid cap equity Index eked out a 0.1% increase. “Canadian equities were positive this month thanks to strength in a number of sectors, with the biggest contributions coming from financials and telecommunications. In spite of weakness in commodity prices, the materials sector in Canada was an overall positive contributor for the month,” Xiao said. Final performance figures will be published next week. Share this article and your comments with peers on social media read more

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First Asset unitholders approve closed-end fund mergers

first_img Keywords Closed-end fundsCompanies First Asset Anne-Marie Vettorel Share this article and your comments with peers on social media Europe Blue-Chip Dividend & Growth Fund confirms termination date First Asset says it anticipates the merger will occur in December, and will issue a press release confirming the date. The completion of one fund merger is not conditional on the completion of any other, First Asset says.Unless they wish to redeem units, unitholders are not required to take any action. Toronto-based First Asset Investment Management Inc. has received unitholder approval to merge First Asset Diversified Convertible Debenture Fund (DCD.UN: TSX), First Asset Canadian Convertibles Fund (ADC.UN: TSX) and First Asset North American Convertibles Fund (NCD.UN: TSX) into First Asset Canadian Convertible Bond ETF (CXF: TSX), the company announced Thursday.Unitholders who would prefer not to participate in the merger may redeem units at net asset value by informing their broker or intermediary as soon as possible, some time before the deadline of 5 p.m. ET on Nov. 14 in case of delays. center_img Faircourt migrates two closed-end funds to NEO Related news Digital Consumer Dividend Fund files IPO Facebook LinkedIn Twitterlast_img read more

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NDA announces new date for Supply Chain Event 2022

first_imgNDA announces new date for Supply Chain Event 2022 The NDA’s ninth supply chain event will now be held on 3 February 2022.Originally due to take place in June 2020 at The International Centre, Telford, the event was postponed due to the Coronavirus pandemic.The same venue will be used for the upcoming event.The Supply Chain Award’s ceremony will take place on the same day with the application deadline being 12 noon on 1 October 2021.Launched in 2011, the supply chain event has attracted a total of around 10,000 visitors from more than 20 countries, representing thousands of companies both large and small.It has been an overwhelming success in engaging with the suppliers that are essential to achieving the NDA’s decommissioning mission.The event has grown from attracting a few hundred visitors to almost 1,700 and is now the largest event of its kind anywhere in Europe.It provides an opportunity to network with more than 300 exhibiting companies and is aimed at attracting new business to the nuclear decommissioning sector – with a particular focus on SMEs.See the supply chain event website /Public Release. This material comes from the originating organization and may be of a point-in-time nature, edited for clarity, style and length. View in full here. Why?Well, unlike many news organisations, we have no sponsors, no corporate or ideological interests. We don’t put up a paywall – we believe in free access to information of public interest. Media ownership in Australia is one of the most concentrated in the world (Learn more). Since the trend of consolidation is and has historically been upward, fewer and fewer individuals or organizations control increasing shares of the mass media in our country. According to independent assessment, about 98% of the media sector is held by three conglomerates. This tendency is not only totally unacceptable, but also to a degree frightening). Learn more hereWe endeavour to provide the community with real-time access to true unfiltered news firsthand from primary sources. It is a bumpy road with all sorties of difficulties. We can only achieve this goal together. Our website is open to any citizen journalists and organizations who want to contribute, publish high-quality insights or send media releases to improve public access to impartial information. You and we have the right to know, learn, read, hear what and how we deem appropriate.Your support is greatly appreciated. All donations are kept completely private and confidential.Thank you in advance!Tags:Award, business, coronavirus, covid-19, Europe, Government, nuclear, pandemic, supply chain, Telford, UK, UK Government, websitelast_img read more

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SEMA cancels its annual Las Vegas show for 2020

first_img The Rolls-Royce Boat Tail may be the most expensive new car ever We encourage all readers to share their views on our articles using Facebook commenting Visit our FAQ page for more information. PlayThe Rolls-Royce Boat Tail may be the most expensive new car everPlay3 common new car problems (and how to prevent them) | Maintenance Advice | Driving.caPlayFinal 5 Minivan Contenders | Driving.caPlay2021 Volvo XC90 Recharge | Ministry of Interior Affairs | Driving.caPlayThe 2022 Ford F-150 Lightning is a new take on Canada’s fave truck | Driving.caPlayBuying a used Toyota Tundra? Check these 5 things first | Used Truck Advice | Driving.caPlayCanada’s most efficient trucks in 2021 | Driving.caPlay3 ways to make night driving safer and more comfortable | Advice | Driving.caPlayDriving into the Future: Sustainability and Innovation in tomorrow’s cars | Driving.ca virtual panelPlayThese spy shots get us an early glimpse of some future models | Driving.ca Ringbrothers wow SEMA with customized classic 1969 Camaro, Mustang RELATED See More Videos SHARE STORY Trending Videos SEMA always runs alongside AAPEX, the Automotive Aftermarket Products Expo, which features automotive supplies for maintenance and repair, along with overseas manufacturers and suppliers offering their services. AAPEX issued a statement that the in-person show has also been cancelled, and it will become “a virtual/digital experience” for 2020. COMMENTSSHARE YOUR THOUGHTS RELATED TAGSFlexNew VehiclesFlex Toyota’s Supra might just be the darling of SEMA 2019SEMA is also a showcase for custom car builders, some of whom create vehicles specifically for the event. When the show closes on Friday night, vehicles then move to SEMA Ignited, an evening car show the public can attend. The four-day event usually draws more than 160,000 people, including 2,400 exhibitors and 3,300 media representatives. Many participants attend from outside the U.S. Earlier this year, the Consumer Electronics Show (CES) announced the cancellation of its January 2021 edition, which will now be entirely digital. The Las Vegas Convention Center, which hosts both CES and SEMA, is about 90 per cent through an expansion on a massive new wing to add 1.4 million square feet, and which was expected to open in time to host CES 2021. The show is normally held inside the Las Vegas Convention Center, with some vendors and show vehicles spilling out into the adjacent parking lots. In a recent questionnaire, the show organizers asked participants if they were willing to attend if the show was held entirely outdoors, or virtually. There’s still a chance that some aspects of the show will be held online. SEMA, the giant annual Specialty Equipment Market Association show held in Las Vegas each November, has been cancelled for 2020. Organizers said the show has been scrubbed “due to COVID-19 and concerns that event facilities and services will be unavailable.”SEMA is a trade show and isn’t open to the public. It’s dedicated solely to the aftermarket — anything that’s bought to be used on, in, or near a vehicle but that doesn’t come with it from the factory, including replacement wheels and tires, engine and suspension modifications, and accessories. The show also caters to body shops, repair facilities, and tool companies, and includes seminars and workshops for them. last_img read more

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New Assistant Vice Chancellor for Safety position creates career opportunity for CU Boulder employees

first_imgShare Share via TwitterShare via FacebookShare via LinkedInShare via E-mail Published: Sept. 22, 2016 The Assistant Vice Chancellor (AVC) for Safety is responsible for broad oversight, planning, organization and coordination of all campus safety functions for CU Boulder. These responsibilities include campus police, environmental, health and safety, oversight of crisis management and coordination of campus-wide response teams in the event of an emergency. The senior-level administrative position reports directly to the Vice Chancellor for Infrastructure and Safety.The AVC, in collaboration with all campus stakeholders, develops and maintains a cohesive, effective and innovative campus and public safety program that is consistent with the vision of the Chancellor and other senior campus leaders. Areas of Focus will include:Culture change – inculcate a culture of safety responsibility across the entire campus populationDevelop a safety communications strategyEnsure that compliance issues do not adversely impact our research missionDevelop relevant policies and standards to ensure interoperability of public safety technologies.Create a strategy for public safety and communications technology and infrastructure to effectively communicate with our University constituents as well as the local community (radio infrastructure, alert systems, social media, etc.)Safety Training and Awareness – enlisting the campus community to be active and aware of their environment and give them the tools to identify and report issuesShift from reactive to proactive operations focusing on preventing issues from occurring versus mitigating issues as they ariseProactively plan for possible emergencies to enable our first responders to quickly mitigate, respond and recover from emergenciesDevelop polices to minimize generation of hazardous waste through collaboration with faculty and the procurement officeLead workforce/workplace safety initiatives and enhance the industrial hygiene program. Effectively review, manage, and mitigate workers’ compensation issues.The position needs a strong leader to champion safety throughout the campus and community.The AVC provides leadership support to the University of Colorado Boulder Police Department (CUPD) and the Department of Environmental Health and Safety, through establishing performance standards for these units and managing the annual budget development and control of a general fund budget. The AVC engages in long-term strategic planning to meet future campus safety needs and represents the University in all facets of safety with the local community and may interact regularly with local government officials and staff concerning safety and emergency preparedness.Salary will be commensurate with skills and experience. Minimum requirements include:A progressive career in professional law enforcement, military/government service, public safety and/or environmental safety, including a minimum of five years of senior command and administrative experience in a department of similar size and scope in a comparable college or university or community is required.Position requires an individual with strong leadership and motivational skills, an open and participatory management style, a history of staff development, budgeting and employee relations skills.An ability to relate positively with diverse communities is required.Knowledge of and successful experience in modern police management and safety principles and practices, particularly with regard to emerging law enforcement and environmental health regulatory issues in higher education, are also required. Demonstrated ability to interact effectively and coordinate with other law enforcement and regulatory agencies and community constituencies is required.Bachelor’s degree. (Additional professional experience within law enforcement, public safety, environmental safety, military and or government services may substitute for the bachelor’s degree on a year-for year basis.)To apply, please submit the following materials to HR Consultant Pam Gross at [email protected] by Monday, Oct. 3:A cover letter that specifically addresses the job requirements and outlines qualifications.A current resume.Categories:Career DevelopmentCampus Communitylast_img read more

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#StopTheCrazyTalk aims to change words, attitudes

first_img Related Articles Consider the following comments you wouldn’t be surprised to overhear in a coffee shop:“She’s so bipolar! One day she’s happy, and the next she’s completely depressed.”“Yeah, that guy is completely schizo, totally unpredictable.”“Man, I’m so OCD about what shoes to wear.”Each one makes colloquial use of a word or shorthand phrase related to a mental-health diagnosis—bipolar disorder, schizophrenia, obsessive compulsive disorder. All are not just imprecise and misleading, but also have the potential to stigmatize people with mental illness.“Why do we casually insult others with mental health labels such as ‘psycho’ or ‘insane’?” asks Meagan Taylor, a 2002 journalism graduate who is now studying integrative physiology at the University of Colorado Boulder. “We will never get rid of stigma unless we can change our underlying perceptions of mental illness, and that begins partly with how we use our words.”So, she decided to do something about it. Tasked with creating an outreach project for her abnormal psychology class, Taylor worked with Andrew McGraw, a film studies major, and Lisa Solheim, a former CU art major who is now a mental-health advocate, to create a short public-service video to highlight the problem of stigmatizing language. That video was published this week.“We don’t go around saying ‘that’s so gay’ anymore, or calling people ‘retards,’ because we realized that the way we used those words could be harmful to people who overhear them,” Taylor says. “Our underlying attitudes need to change, so language has to change, and bringing attention to this is a start.”Taylor and McGraw—who met while working for CU’s Emergency Medical Services—recruited volunteers to talk about their experiences with language that stigmatizes mental illness. After conducting pre-interviews, they sat conducted on-camera interviews on April 13.“There is really a desire in the market to tell these kinds of stories, to challenged people’s reality and use of language,” says McGraw, who began making films for YouTube in high school. “I like telling stories that make a difference, make people question their world and challenge them to do better.” Underrepresented students excel through SMART CU Boulder program helps underserved and underrepresented students in the STEM fields gain valuable research experience for graduate school. Read more “A lot of times, somebody says ‘schizophrenic’ and they mean somebody who’s just having a hard time or something,” Solheim says. “But mental illness isn’t the same as someone who’s just screwed up. The guy in Las Vegas who shot up all those people? There was no evidence of mental illness.”But tossing out “mentally ill” any time someone does something harmful or anti-social is surprisingly common, says Solheim, and that can reinforce harmful stereotypes. Solheim recalls the time she sat down for an interview with a man who was renting a room in his house. After he told her he was an alcoholic, she decided to open up about her diagnosis.“I thought, ‘Wow, we’re admitting our foibles here,’ and said, ‘Well, I’m schizophrenic,’” she says. “His immediate reaction was to say, ‘You aren’t going to come kill me in the middle of the night, are you?’”Polls have found that 60 percent of Americans believe people with mental illness are “likely” to act violently toward others. While some studies have found a slight correlation between certain specific diagnoses and violence, more refined investigation has found that other factors, including substance abuse, childhood abuse and family history, are more important.The 2005 MacArthur Violence Risk Assessment Study at the University of Virginia, for example, controlled for substance use and other environmental factors and found no significant difference in the rates of violence among people with mental illness and other people living in the same neighborhood.Taylor, who plans to become a physician’s assistant, said her work as a volunteer at a hospital and working in emergency services increased her compassion for people with mental illness. She hopes the PSA will be a small step to help change the way we use language.“The mental-health community and their allies need to stand up for proper use of terminology, stop casual labels, and promote language empathy if we want people with mental illness to be culturally integrated,” she wrote in her proposal for the PSA.“We’re not talking about political correctness or policing language,” she says. “We’re talking about being sensitive human beings.”Abnormal Psychology, PSYC 3303, is taught by Professor June Gruber. Boulder resident and former CU Boulder art student Lisa Solheim watches Andrew McGraw (film studies, ’19) interview Micah Salazar (MCDB, ’18) in the lobby of the Roser ATLAS building. McGraw and Meagan Taylor (Jour, ’02) made a PSA on combating verbal stigma surrounding mental illness. Salazar discussed his work as a pharmacy technician in a mental-health centered pharmacy, while Solheim discussed her experiences with schizophrenia. Photos by Meagan Taylor. Besides their student volunteers, Taylor and McGraw also turned the lens on Solheim, who has served on the speaker’s board for the nonprofit Mental Health Partners. Mental illness isn’t the same as someone who’s just screwed up. The guy in Las Vegas who shot up all those people? There was no evidence of mental illness.” Share Share via TwitterShare via FacebookShare via LinkedInShare via E-mail By Clay Bonnyman Evans • Published: April 25, 2018 CU Boulder students create PSA to illuminate language that stigmatizes mental illness CU clinic diagnoses kids’ obstacles to learning A clinic at CU Boulder is helping lower-income families determine why their children have trouble learning and is assisting those families as they seek the right treatment. Read more CU Boulder bipolar clinic will close after 17 years The Sutherland Bipolar Center has helped more than 2,100 Coloradans affected by bipolar disorder, regardless of their ability to pay. Read more Tags:Film StudiesIntegrative PhysiologyOutreachPsychology and Neurosciencestudentslast_img read more

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History Lesson

first_imgHOYLAKE, England – The comparisons were always going to be misguided, if not wildly unfair. This was always going to be a different course than the one that hosted the great Dust Open of 2006. It was, observers concluded, a different swing, a different time, a different Tiger than the one who surgically picked the place apart on his way to his third claret jug eight years ago. Despite that reasoning, those comparisons were sure to come. It is always the burden that when you author a masterpiece fans eagerly await a sequel that is every bit as captivating no matter how outrageous those expectations may be. When Tiger Woods bogeyed the first hole early on Thursday at Royal Liverpool the social universe reminded anyone with a wireless connection that he also bogeyed his first hole in ’06, when arguably the best ball-striking week of his career delivered a two-stroke victory. When he bogeyed the second, however, a chorus of concern could be heard across the Dee Estuary; but slowly, methodically, earnestly, Woods plodded his way back to relevance: A birdie at the par-5 fifth hole from 8 feet to turn at 1 over was followed by a barrage of five birdies in six holes starting at No. 11. Maybe this could be like ’06. Open Championship full-field scores Open Championship: Articles, videos and photos Maybe all that talk of getting his “speed” and “explosiveness” back was starting to resonate. Maybe his short week at the Quicken Loans National – where he returned to action following back surgery on March 31 – was little more than a litmus test and not a long-term indication of things to come. “I’m not going to be the only guy in a 72-hole event to make two bogeys. I just got mine out of the way early,” Woods figured following a 3-under 69 that left him three behind leader Rory McIlroy. The 143rd Open Championship was always going to be compared to that clinic he put on in ’06 regardless of the reality that he entered the week with just 36 holes under his belt since returning from the DL and is some 11 months removed from his last major start. But as a glorious morning progressed, his game, and his championship outlook, improved, just like he said it would. “That’s why I’ve been telling you guys it was so important for me to play at Congressional,” Woods said. “The fact that I was able to recover every day, and the fact that I was stronger, more explosive the more days I played. I’m only going to get better from that point.” When Woods closed his round in increasingly windy conditions, the similarities to his performance in ’06 were eerie. For the day, Woods hit just one driver, at the par-5 16th hole, the same number he hit for the entire week eight years ago. He found 10 of 14 fairways and 14 of 18 greens in regulation, compared to 11 of 14 and 12 of 18 in ’06. He needed 28 putts, one more than he took on Day 1 the last time he played Hoylake. That he did all this after playing his first two in 2 over par also echoed of ’06, when he rounded his final 71 holes in 19 under par. “It felt good to be back out there competing again. It wasn’t exactly the greatest of starts,” Woods said. In fact, the only thing that was missing on Day 1 was a yellow golf course cooked by unseasonably hot conditions to bouncy perfection. But it’s still early. Woods’ rally began at the 11th hole, where he missed the green right from the middle of the fairway with a wedge in his hand and rolled in a 30-footer from the fringe that prompted a fist pump. He followed with a 10-footer at the 12th hole, an 8-footer at the 13th hole and a punched 7-iron at No. 15 to 15 feet before nearly making eagle at the 16th hole. He endured the predictable rub of the green that is as much a part of links golf as fescue and aiming poles when his second at the closing hole found the back of a greenside bunker and he could do no better than par. He even sounded like he did in ’06. “I played what the golf course allowed me to play,” he said on Thursday. Eight years ago after his second round he had a similar take, “It all depends what I feel the golf course gives me,” he said. But perhaps the most encouraging comparison to ’06 was what Woods did after his round. The world No. 7 signed his card, spoke his piece with the press and bolted for the practice tee for an extended session, an option that wasn’t available before he underwent microdiscectomy. “I need to get everything a little bit better. That’s the case all of the time,” he reasoned. Much has transpired in the years since the game’s oldest championship was played on the Wirral peninsula, but for Woods Thursday at Hoylake felt like old times.last_img read more

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