Pro-SARP Motion Passed in Ontario Legislature

first_img Horse Sport Enews Subscribe to the Horse Sport newsletter and get an exclusive bonus digital edition! More from Horse Sport:Christilot Boylen Retires From Team SportAfter an exemplary career as one of Canada’s top Dressage riders, seven-time Olympian Christilot Boylen has announced her retirement from team competition.2020 Royal Agricultural Winter Fair CancelledFor only the second time in its history, The Royal Agricultural Winter Fair has been cancelled but plans are being made for some virtual competitions.Royal Agricultural Winter Fair Statement on 2020 EventAs the Province of Ontario starts to reopen, The Royal’s Board and staff will adhere to all recommendations put forward by government and health officials.Government Financial Assistance for Ontario FarmersOntario Equestrian has recently released this update of several financial assistance packages available, including those for farm business. Email* SIGN UP The Ontario Legislature passed a motion to continue the Slots at Racetracks Program beyond the cancellation deadline imposed by the Liberals. In addition, the motion called for the suspension of the Ontario Lottery and Gaming Corporation’s gaming modernization plan until municipal referendums can be held in 2014.The motion, put forward by Essex MPP Tara Natyshak, received the full cooperation of The Progressive Conservatives and the New Democratic Party and was approved with 53 votes to 33 Liberals against. However, because of the verbiage this motion in non-binding and is simply a suggestion that the government follow this course of action. Whether the Liberals will agree is unclear.The text of Natyshak’s motion is as follows:That, in the opinion of this House, the following principles should be immediately applied to the Province’s gaming policy:1) Implementation of the Ontario Lottery and Gaming Corporation’s transformation of gaming strategy be suspended until after the 2014 Ontario municipal elections in order to allow municipalities wanting to be a host site for a casino to undertake a referendum on the issue on the 2014 ballot;2) A panel, composed of representatives nominated by the three recognized parties, be tasked with hearing from stakeholders and drafting fair spending limits for parties taking part in the referendum on casinos;3) Changes to the Slots at the Racetracks partnership be frozen, in order to enable the horseracing industry to continue to operate while the government engages the industry in a robust consultation with the goal of ensuring its survival, stability and growth; and4) Current funds from unclaimed purses due to racetrack closures be made available to local or community race tracks. Filed March 18, 2013. Tags: Ontario Lottery and Gaming Corporation, slots-at-racetracks, OLG, NDP MPP Taras Natyshak, We’ll send you our regular newsletter and include you in our monthly giveaways. PLUS, you’ll receive our exclusive Rider Fitness digital edition with 15 exercises for more effective riding.last_img read more

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How NFL Star Nnamdi Asomugha Began a New Career on Broadway in A Soldier’s Play

first_imgNnamdi Asomugha(Photos by Caitlin McNaney for Broadway.com) Related Shows “There are a lot of similarities between theater and football just because of how alive it is—breathing the same air as the audience, being in real time and not being able to go back and change something that you did, having to deal with it. In football, you can talk about the 70,000 or 100,000 people that are in the stadium, not to mention the other hundred million that can watch it on TV or YouTube. But in theater, it’s that group right there. It’s immediate for that thousand people, and no one else is going to see what happened in that moment. The similarity is that we’re all in the space together, and we’re all feeding off of each other. You ride a wave with them, the momentum in a play.” Life and Career: Less than 10 years ago, Nnamdi Asomugha was among the most valued players in the National Football League. He was drafted in 2003 by the Oakland Raiders and by 2009, he was regarded by many as the best cornerback in the league and easily the most valuable Raider. In 2011, Asomugah signed with the Philadelphia Eagles. But disorganized coaching and rushed practices tanked Asomugha’s game. In 2013, he retired prematurely from the League. Since then, he’s forged a swift and successful career in entertainment, despite having no interest in performance as a kid. His stage and screen credits include off-Broadway’s Good Grief and the film Fire with Fire, and he was the acclaimed producer and star of Crown Heights. Asomugha is also an executive producer of the Oscar-nominated Harriet. He’s married to fellow actor Kerry Washington. “I was probably in the middle of my career in the NFL when I started to think, ‘OK, what should I be doing next? What should the next avenue be?’ I thought initially that it was going to be in broadcasting, but then I started to fall in love with acting just by doing commercials and getting encouragement from people in the business to pursue it. So, I went into every off-season thinking ‘Let me continue to study acting a little bit.’ I would take a couple of weeks here and there and really dived in.” Show Closed This production ended its run on March 15, 2020 Star Files “I think for a lot of people, you don’t see a football player and think vulnerability. You finish a game and you want to yell and you want to scream because you’re frustrated or you’re excited. But in the moments where you’re in front of the camera, there’s a standard way of responding, especially if you lost the game: we’re going to go back on Monday, we’re going to look at the film, we’ll get better for the next game. But on the inside, you’re going crazy. There’s that level of conditioning that you go through that can really affect you as an actor in a negative way. So I started taking classes, and I just started to find other ways to open up and be as vulnerable an actor as possible.”Charles Fuller spoke about this concept of the double victory: African Americans at that time [during WWII] were trying to win the war for their country, but were also trying to win the war for their race. Being a part of the war meant they could have a chance at a double victory. If we can all come together and fight for America, maybe when the war is over, fellow Americans will see us differently. We all talked about it as a company during rehearsal and shared our views on it. That had a huge impact on me.””It’s not often that you get a play on Broadway where a group of 10 or so African American men can look at each other and laugh, have fun and really talk about things that are difficult within the race, things we don’t expose but are being exposed in this play to a wider audience. I’m just very blessed to be a part of it.”Watch Asomugha talk more about his career change below!Video Player is loading.Play VideoPlayMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration 2:29Loaded: 6.68%Stream Type LIVESeek to live, currently playing liveLIVERemaining Time -2:29 Playback Rate1xChaptersChaptersDescriptionsdescriptions off, selectedCaptionscaptions settings, opens captions settings dialogcaptions off, selectedEnglishAudio Tracken (Main), selectedFullscreenThis is a modal window.Beginning of dialog window. 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This modal can be closed by pressing the Escape key or activating the close button.center_img Warner Miller and Nnamdi Asomugha in “A Soldier’s Play” (Photo: Joan Marcus) A Soldier’s Play Nnamdi Asomugha Age: 38Hometown: Born in Lafayette, Louisiana to Nigerian parents, raised in Los Angeles, California. Current role: Nnamdi Asomugha is making his Broadway debut as Private First Class Melvin Peterson in Charles Fuller’s 1982 Pulitzer Prize-winning drama, A Soldier’s Play. A pivotal player in the story of a black army sergeant who violently abuses his segregated military unit during World War II, Peterson was first portrayed by Denzel Washington at the Negro Ensemble Company in 1981.  View Commentslast_img read more

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