SMC Board Approves Ambitious Goals to Fight Racial Inequity

first_img a non partisan racial culture must get inside the true culture …we must Have Americana culture the more cultural canons.we have then more flexible we must speak.For instance stop the train wreck…the first word to encompass all xulture is Amerixulrure.We are AmericacaucasionAfricana proles..Americafricana people’s..AmeeixAsian people..Americevreic..americoccidentalArabic..Americispanic..americlatino…AmericAsianafricanacaucasion…its not.easy to say at first its physics..its important that educated people learn to speak and recieve each other the same… Americslavonic people…Americanative people other’s may join us where there is AmericafricanikEnglicanacaucasion Prince Buford of England 1 Comment John Patrick Jewell III says: May 12, 2019 at 7:26 AM Downtown – Santa Monica Democrats to co-host presidential hopeful Rep Tulsi GabbardCouncil to hear appeal on landmarked Wilmont treesYou Might Also LikeFeaturedNewsBobadilla rejects Santa Monica City Manager positionMatthew Hall8 hours agoNewsBruised but unbowed, meme stock investors are back for moreAssociated Press19 hours agoNewsWedding boom is on in the US as vendors scramble to keep upAssociated Press19 hours agoNewsCouncil picks new City ManagerBrennon Dixson19 hours agoFeaturedNewsProtesting parents and Snapchat remain in disagreement over child protection policiesClara Harter19 hours agoFeaturedNewsDowntown grocery to become mixed use developmenteditor19 hours ago Comments are closed. HomeNewsCity CouncilSMC Board Approves Ambitious Goals to Fight Racial Inequity May. 11, 2019 at 5:20 amCity CouncilEducationFeaturedNewsPoliticsSanta Monica CollegeSMC Board Approves Ambitious Goals to Fight Racial InequityGuest Author2 years agoAB 1809barry snellInequityQuinoñes-PerezRacial Inequitysanta monica college board of trusteessmcsusan aminoff by Theo Greenly, SMC Corsair / Daily Press Staff WriterThe Santa Monica College Board of Trustees voted unanimously on Tuesday to adopt goals aimed at aggressively combating racial inequities among students.A new state law, AB 1809, Chapter 33, requires all colleges to set goals for the number of students who earn degrees or certificates, transfer to four-year colleges, or find employment in their field of study. SMC voted to go beyond the minimum numbers required by the Chancellor’s Office in their plan, known as the Vision for Success Goals.The goals outlined in the proposal are heavily influenced by SMC’s Student Equity Plan, which aims to close, and ultimately eliminate equity gaps between white, Asian, African-American, and Latino students. The Student Equity Plan must be submitted to the state by June 31.The timeline was originally agreed on by a joint committee who planned implementation for the 2021-22 academic year. However, members at the school’s executive level pushed the dates back to the 2026-27 school year, an act that left some students and faculty members anxious that the school was turning their back on the fight against racial inequities. “I have worked at SMC for nearly 22 years. In those 22 years I have never made a public comment at a board meeting,” said Sherry Bradford, program leader of the Black Collegians Program. “But tonight the stakes are extremely high for our African American and Latinx students.”As word spread that the vision goals were being postponed, rumors began to spread among students that SMC was reducing some services, including eliminating the African American Collegiate Center and the Latino Center.“Unfortunately, the students got the message … that there was the possible elimination of the Black Collegian Center and the Latino Center,” said Trustee Dr. Margaret Quinoñes-Perez. “They see this stuff and their deductive reasoning says, ‘Oh that means elimination of those things.’”Those rumors were unsubstantiated and Quinoñes-Perez asserted that no plans to eliminate the centers had ever been discussed.The board eventually voted to respect the more ambitious 2021-22 timeline. A crowd of students and faculty members spilled into the overflow room and erupted into applause when the measure passed. However many board members remained skeptical.“For me there are goals, and there are reachable goals backed up with money,” said Trustee Dr. Susan Aminoff. “So can someone tell me how we are to meet these very lofty goals within the constraints of our budget?”“Do we think that we can achieve them? We understand that these are really aspirational. They’re more symbolic than anything,” said Hannah Lawler, as Vice Chair of the Institutional Effectiveness Committee which put the plan together. “By setting lofty goals without figuring out all the mechanics of how we’re going to achieve it, I think we’re using these goals to motivate us.”Trustee Rob Rader raised concerns that the vision goals were oversimplified.“When we don’t parse our data more accurately and control better for the numbers, we end up treating each group as monolithic,” Rader said. “We treat all African-American students as just the same, we treat all Latinx students just the same. And different students come from different backgrounds, they have different experiences coming in, and they may require very different strategies.”“I’m very happy to go for aspirational goals,” Rader added, “but I do think that goals without mechanisms are better characterized as wishful thinking.”Not every board member agreed. Trustee Barry Snell commended the plan.“This is the first time that I’ve sat on the dais that I really believe we can do this,” Snell said. “We can do this. This is not a dream. This is an action plan … this is something that can be achieved, and I’m all in from a trustee standpoint.”Budget and implementation plans don’t have to be submitted until next year.This story was produced as part of a partnership between the SMC Corsair Student newspaper and the Santa Monica Daily Press. Tags :AB 1809barry snellInequityQuinoñes-PerezRacial Inequitysanta monica college board of trusteessmcsusan aminoffshare on Facebookshare on Twittershow 1 commentlast_img read more

Learn more →