Teaching children how to cope with life’s challenges

first_imgShare on Facebook Email Share on Twitter Share “What we have found with our work is that starting these conversations about coping early on helps children develop good coping habits,” says Associate Professor Frydenberg. “We need to teach children to manage those worries so they don’t become uncontrollable worries because that’s what poor mental health is – when you don’t feel you have the resources to manage situations that are challenging or difficult. It’s inevitable that we’ll have anxiety as we go through life but problems occur when it goes on for too long without being managed or dealt with.”How can parents help children develop helpful coping strategies?Associate Professor Frydenberg FAPS says parents can help children to cope by discouraging unhelpful strategies – like excessive crying, tantrums, blaming oneself and anger – and encouraging helpful strategies such as asking for help, saying sorry and staying calm.She says encouraging children to talk to an adult about their worries is particularly effective when it leads to conversations about coping. In fact, children as young as four and five have, on average, 36 ways of describing how they cope that can be used in conversations.“What parents can do is acknowledge the upset of children and talk about the different ways children can deal with a situation,” says Associate Professor Frydenberg. “We find that even saying that to children generally develops a positive reaction and generates some ideas about what they could do.”And as with all things parenting, modelling helpful coping skills is a powerful teaching strategy. “Adults are role models and children learn from adults,” says Associate Professor Frydenberg. “It’s important for adults to think about their own coping skills.”Assoc. Professor Frydenberg is presenting her work at the Australian Psychological Society Congress 2016, in Melbourne, 13-16 September.center_img Just like adults, young children have worries that cause stress. Adults may worry about job security or a fight with a partner, while children may stress about a friend moving away or losing their favourite toy. But in much the same way as grown-ups, children who use positive coping strategies are more likely to work through their worries, reduce stress and bounce back from difficulties. And children who develop these helpful coping strategies are more likely to become resilient, mentally healthy adults. Who are the best teachers of coping skills for children? You guessed it: parents.Why are coping skills important?Coping skills are what we think and do to help us get through difficult situations, which, as much as we wish they weren’t, are an unavoidable part of life. Psychologist Associate Professor Erica Frydenberg from the Melbourne Graduate School of Education says for children aged four to six these situations are often things like saying goodbye to a parent at kinder or school, having to try something new or wanting to belong to a group of friends.She says helping children to cope with these sorts of worries will equip them with skills to cope with adult-sized problems later in life and help to reduce the risk of mental health problems like depression and anxiety, which affect an estimated one in seven school-age children. LinkedIn Pinterestlast_img read more

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Flight and fight

first_imgSubscribe now for unlimited access Get your free guest access  SIGN UP TODAY To continue enjoying Building.co.uk, sign up for free guest accessExisting subscriber? LOGIN Stay at the forefront of thought leadership with news and analysis from award-winning journalists. Enjoy company features, CEO interviews, architectural reviews, technical project know-how and the latest innovations.Limited access to building.co.ukBreaking industry news as it happensBreaking, daily and weekly e-newsletters Subscribe to Building today and you will benefit from:Unlimited access to all stories including expert analysis and comment from industry leadersOur league tables, cost models and economics dataOur online archive of over 10,000 articlesBuilding magazine digital editionsBuilding magazine print editionsPrinted/digital supplementsSubscribe now for unlimited access.View our subscription options and join our communitylast_img read more

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The Coach Shinnick Show – September 4

first_imgPrint Friendly Version It’s this year’s first episode of the Coach Shinnick Show! #GoArgos 🏈 Recap @UWFFootball’s fall camp🏈 Meet Logan Bush and @GoTeamIMPACT🏈 Preview Carson-Newman⚔️ Preview @UWFMSoccer, @UWFWSOC, @UWFVolleyball, and @UWFXC last_img

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Kobayashi claims 5,000-meters win

first_img GET THE BEST OF THE JAPAN TIMES IN FIVE EASY PIECES WITH TAKE 5 RELATED PHOTOS Winning feeling: Yuriko Kobayashi celebrates her 5,000-meters win in Kawasaki on Sunday. | KYODO PHOTOcenter_img Kobayashi, 19, made big improvements as a runner this season.“I really struggled last year and it was the biggest turnaround for me to have won this race,” Kobayashi said. “I entered the race trying to have particular emotions as I could compete with such star runners (including Shibui and Fukushi).“In last year’s tournament (nationals), I was like, ‘I definitely had to go to the World Championships,’ and then I failed. But this year, I wasn’t thinking that way and thinking like, ‘If I could go to the Olympics, that’d be a bonus.’ I guess it’s good for me to run relaxed.”Shibui, who led for much of the race, felt pressure from the runners who chased her and then overtook her. “I felt the will to win from behind me today,” Shibui admitted. “I thought (the timing of their spurt) would come in the last five laps, but nobody came. Then, it might be two laps, and it was two laps. I wanted to win but my movement wasn’t very sharp today.”In the always-popular men’s 100-meter final, Naoki Tsukahara triumphed for the third straight year. He won the race in 10.31 seconds, a solid time on a wet, chilly afternoon. Three-time Olympian Nobuharu Asahara, 36, was the No. 2 finisher, clocking 10.37 seconds.“I’m pleased, frankly speaking,” Tsukahara said after his win. “I watched my semifinal race and figured my start wasn’t very good. But I was able to enter the final having fixed it. I and my coach were talking that the race would be decided in the last 10 meters. Considering the ability I have for now, I think I could put out everything I had.”Other women’s winners on Sunday were Asami Tanno (400, 52.68 seconds), Chisato Fukushima (100, 11.48), Mika Yoshikawa (1,500, 4:12.79) and Yuka Murofushi, who picked up her seventh-straight national championships title in the discus with a top toss of 53.36 meters.On the men’s side, Yuzo Kanemaru took the top spot in the 400 (45.69), Fumikazu Kobayashi was victorious in the 1,500 (3:49.96), while Yasuhiro Tago was 5 hundredths of a second behind him.Yoshitaka Iwamizu won the 3,000 steeplechase in 8:29.75. Hikaru Tsuchiya triumphed in the high jump (2.18 meters). KAWASAKI — Yuriko Kobayashi zoomed to the finish line for a victory in the meet-concluding women’s 5,000-meter race on Sunday in the Japan Athletics National Championships.On a rainy evening at Todoroki Stadium, the Hyogo Prefecture native separated herself from the front of the pack over the final two laps, extending her lead as the finish line approached. Her winning time was 15 minutes, 11.97 seconds. Nanae Kuwashiro placed second in 15.13.96. Other well-known runners, Kayoko Fukushi and Yoko Shibui, finished third and fourth, respectively.last_img read more

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Who has the bigger TV, Ronaldo or Messi? We rank their televisions with legends glued to screen during lockdown

first_img Animals are so funny that you can die of laughter Source: Soccer – thesun.co.uk Real or Fake? Shark Attacks Helicopter Most awesome bullfighting festival Rebekah Vardy scores an impressive penalty in six-inch heels People Slammed By Massive Waves 4center_img Travel Diary // Vietnam 2017 GIVE these two an inch, and they’ll run you ragged on a football pitch.And when it comes to their tellies, both Lionel Messi and Cristiano Ronaldo know that size matters.Messi and Ronaldo love watching telly on massive TVsCredit: Getty – ContributorDuring the coronavirus lockdown these two footballing gods and their families will have been settling down in front of their TV to catch up on their favourite shows.They are certainly stars of the screen but which has the biggest gogglebox? Ronaldo or Messi?RONNIE’S MERE 65insHaving four children, Ronaldo needs several TVs in his house.Sat on his wall, with a snazzy border, is this effort that he and partner Georgina Rodriguez prefer to settle in front of.Our measuring tape shows this one boasts a 65″ screen.While we’re not sure on what brand it is, it certainly would’ve have come cheap knowing Ronaldo’s expensive taste.But surely on his downtime he could’ve found something else to watch other than footy?In his living room this 65″ TV works well for RonaldoCredit: Instagram @georginagioCristiano Ronaldo uses his KIDS as weights while doing sit-ups as Georgina calls them ‘the bestRONNIE’S MODEST 75insIf there’s one thing the pair can agree on, it’s that Samsung TVs are the way forward.However, Ronaldo lags slightly behind Messi when it comes to the inches on his telly. But Ronaldo chooses to entertain his brood with this TV which we reckon is 75″ from corner to corner.It would’ve cost around £4,5000.It’s not too shabby but marginally smaller than Leo’s whopper.Both footballers agree on Samsung TVs as their brand of choiceCredit: Instagram @georginagioRonaldo’s 75″ offering isn’t badCredit: Instagram @georginagioMESSI’S MONSTER 85insWhen Messi was missing in action during a Champions League tie against Bate Borisov, he showed off a brilliant telly he was watching all the action from.Sat on the wall of his massive Barcelona mansion which we estimate was a 85″ Samsung TV that would’ve cost the Argie ace somewhere in the region of £5,500.Watching the game on that beast must’ve made the 5ft 7in forward believe he was almost in the thick of the action!In fact, it’s even bigger than him, as he stands at 67ins in his socks.So MESSI wins the biggest telly prize.Not quite a Ballon d’Or but maybe another reason for Ronaldo to be jealous…Messi boasts this massive 85″ TV that is bigger than anything Ronaldo hasCredit: Facebook – Leo Messi 10 INCREDIBLE Space Launch Failures! REAL vs FAKE GOLDlast_img read more

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