The Savior of Blockbuster: The US Postal Service?

first_imgWhy Tech Companies Need Simpler Terms of Servic… josh catone 1 Blockbuster has had a rough year, posting a loss last quarter of $35 million and closing over 500 stores in the past year, but a new report out by the US Office of the Inspector General of the US Postal Service may put heat on chief rival Netflix. According to an audit by the OIG, the type of return mailers that Netflix uses jam automatic mail sorters and cost the post office about $21 million per year in manual sorting costs, reports Wired Epicenter.The result is that the OIG has recommended that the USPS impose a 17 cent surcharge on each mailer. This, according to Citi analysts Mark Mahaney and Tony Wible, would cut Netflix’s operating income per subscriber by 67%. “If [Netflix] has to bear the full brunt of this increase (without other cost offsets), monthly operating income per paying subscriber would fall 67% from $1.05 to $0.35,” wrote the analysts. Blockbuster’s mailers, on the other hand, are not prone to the autosort jamming problem, said Wible and Mahaney.Analysts expect that Netflix will likely redesign their mailer to preempt any potential rate hike. Redesigning their mailers is something that that company has done numerous times over the past 8 years, and is a likely solution to the potential problem with the postal service.Even so, Mahaney and Wible are unimpressed with the business, writing, “a price hike would exacerbate the risks we see in Netflix’s business model as aggressive pricing, maturity concerns, and higher costs prevail.” They reiterated their “sell” rating on the stock and gave Blockbuster a “buy.” A Web Developer’s New Best Friend is the AI Wai… Tags:#news#web center_img Related Posts Top Reasons to Go With Managed WordPress Hosting 8 Best WordPress Hosting Solutions on the Marketlast_img read more

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Call for Coaches & Managers for Masters World Cup 2019

first_imgTFA is currently seeking to appoint suitably qualified coaches to the vacant coaching and team manager positions within the National Masters Program. The Australian teams will be attending the 2019 Masters World Cup in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia from the 25th April to 5th May 2019.Expression of Interest ProcessTFA is seeking Expressions of Interest (EOI) from suitably qualified, currently accredited and active Elite level coaches and managers to fill the following positions:National Masters Program:Mens 30’s Coach, Assistant Coach and ManagerMens 35’s Coach, Assistant Coach and ManagerMens 40’s Coach, Assistant Coach and ManagerMens 45’s Coach, Assistant Coach and ManagerMens 50’s Coach, Assistant Coach and ManagerWomens 27’s Coach, Assistant Coach and ManagerWomens 35’s Coach, Assistant Coach and ManagerSenior Mixed Coach, Assistant Coach and ManagerCoaches and Assistant CoachesTo submit your EOI for all coaching positions, click here: https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/masterscoach(The EOI will include: Name; Contact Details; NCAS Coaching Level; Previous Elite level [only] Coaching Experience.)Team ManagersTFA is also seeking EOIs for the team manager positions. To submit your EOI for team manager positions, click here: https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/mastersmanagerEOIs for all positions will close at 5pm Monday 1st October, 2018. (Note: This date has had to be brought forward)Appointment termsThe appointment term for these positions will be from date of appointment in 2018 through to completion of all responsibilities after the 2019 World Cup. This campaign will involve attendance by the appointed Coaches and Managers at all team and national selection camps throughout the World Cup preparation.For more info on all of the above, click here: 2019 Masters Coach & Manager EOI.last_img read more

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23 days agoLuis Suarez: Only right Barcelona Champions League favourites

first_imgAbout the authorCarlos VolcanoShare the loveHave your say Luis Suarez: Only right Barcelona Champions League favouritesby Carlos Volcano23 days agoSend to a friendShare the loveLuis Suarez says Barcelona are happy to be regarded as Champions League favourites.Suarez struck twice in the 2-1 victory over Inter Milan.Many across Europe see Barcelona as the favourites to win the Champions League this season.”We’re at the best club in the world and everything is scrutinised,” Suarez stated.”Being strong and focused, knowing that we’re the team to beat, is the mentality that we must have in the Champions League [this season].” last_img read more

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20 days agoMan Utd boss Solskjaer delivers Pogba injury update

first_imgMan Utd boss Solskjaer delivers Pogba injury updateby Paul Vegas20 days agoSend to a friendShare the loveManchester United boss Ole Gunnar Solskjaer admits he is unlikely to call upon Paul Pogba for the trip to Newcastle on Sunday.Pogba has had a nagging ankle problem since United’s 1-1 draw at Southampton at the end of August and missed France’s Euro 2020 qualifiers against Albania and Andorra.He was also unavailable for the Red Devils in fixtures against Leicester and West Ham before starting games against Rochdale and Arsenal. Asked if he would have any key players back from injury for the weekend, Solskjaer said: “I don’t know. Let’s see on Saturday morning. Probably not.”On Pogba being fit for Sunday, the Norwegian added: “Probably not, there’s an international break as well, so it might be time for us to give him 10 or 14 days extra to be ready for the Liverpool game.” About the authorPaul VegasShare the loveHave your saylast_img read more

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BC PRODUCTION SECTOR NETFLIX UNVEIL NEW INITIATIVE FOR LOCAL SCREENWRITERS

first_imgAdvertisement Login/Register With: Advertisement “This program demonstrates the truly innovative and entrepreneurial spirit of our domestic production sector. Designed to maximize the impact of the Province’s new tax credit for domestic screenwriters, this program will significantly increase the pool of skilled writers in British Columbia, and strengthen our local film industry as whole,” said Lisa Beare, Minister of Tourism, Arts and Culture. “I look forward to seeing how these industry supports generate more original BC content in the years ahead.”The Scripted Series Lab is the Program’s first training course, combining real-world story-room experience with one-on-one mentorship to equip writers with the skills, experience, and connections necessary to build a successful screenwriting career. The Program’s longer term strategic planning envisions a range of offerings for screenwriters with varied levels of practical experience.“This initiative is exciting for me personally because I’ve worked with exceptional Canadian writers and creatives throughout my career, particularly in the impressive production hub of Western Canada,” said Chris Regina, Netflix director of scripted co-license and original television. “Fostering the next generation of screenwriters is important to us in our continued collaboration with Canadian creatives, bringing them into the Netflix family.” Netflix’s support of the Pacific Screenwriting Program comes from its fund to develop the next generation of Canadian creators and talent.“The Pacific Screenwriting Program is a keystone for the increasingly focused ecosystem of support for BC storytellers,” said Prem Gill, CEO of Creative BC. “This collaboration between Netflix, CMPA, the Writers Guild of Canada and Creative BC is a strategic complement to the province’s recent inclusion of screenwriters in its Film Incentive BC tax credit. Together, these supports increase BC’s domestic creators’ competitive positioning as demand for screen-based content grows exponentially around the globe.”“We’re pleased that screenwriters in B.C. will have the opportunity to further their careers through the kind of professional development offered by the Pacific Screenwriting program,” said WGC Executive Director Maureen Parker. “One of the best ways for emerging screenwriters to learn is from experienced WGC showrunners, and this new program will help facilitate that process.”For details about how to apply for the inaugural Scripted Series Lab, click here. To learn more about the Pacific Screenwriting Program, please visit our website. ABOUT THE PACIFIC SCREENWRITING PROGRAMThe Pacific Screenwriting Program was established in 2018 with the goal of building a vibrant screenwriter community in British Columbia. Based in Vancouver, the not-for-profit organization provides training and support to BC-based TV film and television writers at all levels, with the aim of generating a deep and sustainable pool of local talent for BC-based series and films. For more information please visit www.pacificscreenwriting.comABOUT NETFLIXNetflix is the world’s leading internet entertainment service with 130 million memberships in over 190 countries enjoying TV series, documentaries and feature films across a wide variety of genres and languages. Members can watch as much as they want, anytime, anywhere, on any internet-connected screen. Members can play, pause and resume watching, all without commercials or commitments.ABOUT THE CMPA – BC PRODUCERS BRANCHThe CMPA-BC is a trade association representing member companies across British Columbia engaged in the production and distribution of television programs, feature films, and interactive media content. We are significant employers of BC creative talent and we assume the financial and creative risk of developing our stories and original content for Canadian and international audiences. Our members create content for distribution on traditional film and television, internet and mobile wireless platforms. www.cmpa.caABOUT THE WGCThe Writers Guild of Canada (WGC) is a professional association of more than 2,200 English-language screenwriters. WGC members are the creative force behind Canada’s successful TV shows, movies, and webseries, and their work brings the diversity of Canadian life and culture to the world’s screens. The WGC supports Canadian screenwriters through negotiating and administering collective agreements with independent producers and broadcasters to ensure that screenwriters earn fair pay and benefits, and advocates for policies that foster Canadian programming and production. The WGC is also an essential professional hub for screenwriters, bringing them together as a community, and boosting their profile in the industry and beyond. For more information, visit www.wgc.ca or on Twitter, @WGCtweetABOUT CREATIVE BCCreative BC is an independent agency created and supported by the Province of B.C. to sustain and help grow B.C.’s creative sector (film and television, digital and interactive media, music, and magazine and book publishing industries). The agency delivers a wide range of programs and services to expand B.C.’s creative economy. These include the administration of the provincial government’s tax credit programs for film and television; development funding and export marketing support; and motion picture production services to attract inward investment and market B.C. as a destination for domestic and international production. The agency acts as an industry catalyst and ambassador to help B.C.’s creative sector reach its economic and creative potential both at home and globally.Stay up to date with initiatives from Creative BC:Twitter, Facebook, Instagram: @creativebcsWebsite: https://www.creativebc.com/ Organizations and leaders from across BC’s media production sector announced the launch of the Pacific Screenwriting Program. The Program is billed as an intensive training ground that will provide support and career-advancement opportunities for active and aspiring screenwriters from across BC. The initiative is the result of generous support from Netflix, Creative BC, and the Canadian Media Producers Association, as well as strategic guidance from the Writers Guild of Canada.“This announcement is the result of the BC-based film and TV community coming together to build on our potential to be global leaders in content creation. I’ve seen firsthand how the success of our provincial production sector has created a steadily growing demand for local film and television screenwriters,” noted Omnifilm Entertainment’s Brian Hamilton, who serves on the CMPA-BC Branch Council and has been tapped as the inaugural Chair of the new not-for-profit Pacific Screenwriting Program. “The goal of the Program is to foster and expand the vibrant screenwriter community in British Columbia, growing the sector and developing locally owned and controlled stories for export to the world.”Launching alongside the Pacific Screenwriting Program is its flagship training initiative, the Scripted Series Lab. Beginning in January 2019, the full-time professional development opportunity will train up to six BC-based, entry-level writers, helping them to hone their craft, strengthen their collaboration and presentation skills, and obtain a deeper understanding of the global scripted content industry. Applications for the Scripted Series Lab are now being accepted. An information night is being held on August 8. More information about the event can be found here.center_img Twitter Advertisement Facebook LEAVE A REPLY Cancel replyLog in to leave a comment last_img read more

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Mikmaq womens centre A safe haven in Sydneys ugly underbelly

first_imgAccording to the 2016 Report Card on Child and Family Poverty in Nova Scotia, 75 per cent of children in Eskasoni live in poverty.“As people, we don’t like poor people, right? We got to look at that. That’s true,” said Heidi Marshall. “And the women come to Sydney and they try to access services and they’re faced with racism and discrimination.”It’s a harsh reality that has Mi’kmaw communities stepping up, though finding solutions isn’t easy.“What surprised me is that people wanted to help the girls … and they didn’t know how to. It’s really tough,” said Maloney. “So the centre provides an opportunity for the Mi’kmaq to surround with girls with the love, support and the safety that they need.”The purpose of the resource centre isn’t to deal with larger systemic problems around racism or family violence or poverty or housing. What it does is provide a safe place. No one is pushing the girls into rehab. No one is trying to pull the women off the streets.“Number One to me is non-judgmental services. Very important,” said Marshall.The women might come hang out before they go to work on the streets. They might be in recovery and yet come in for clean needles.“Don’t judge. Ever,” Marshall repeated. “This is the first time in their life where someone accepted them for who they are and, you know, their addiction or lifestyle doesn’t define who they are.”The chiefs of the five Mi’kmaw communities in Cape Breton cover the rent for the centre in Sydney. Marshall found money to pay for the program she’s running over the next three months.That covers resource materials. But the rest is donations and a lot of volunteerism.“If we didn’t have partnerships and community buy-in this place wouldn’t exist,” said Marshall.The centre chases down funding from a few pots like the Nova Scotia Status of Women’s Sexual Violence Strategy. Indigenous and Northern Affair’s Family Violence Prevention Program. Some money from Health Canada for mental health support. But it’s not enough.“Definitely funding, it’s a huge issue here,” said Marshall. “I know that we can run that we can run, I don’t want to say the word, like, a half-assed program, based on just volunteers. But we need an outreach worker. I need to have a program coordinator. I need a mental health worker.”With the announcement of the national inquiry into Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women and Girls comes the promise of action.But Maloney asks, why wait?“Let the inquiry work at the systemic issues, let the inquiry work at doing long term healing for families,” said Maloney. “This centre and work like this is one of those things that need to happen now. If you really want make a difference than this is where the support needs to be. And it shouldn’t have to wait for an inquiry.”There are other initiatives underway. The RCMP in Eskasoni are working with partners in the community to help women at risk.Part of it is an ongoing police investigation.“There’s guys out there that are paying girls in Eskasoni to bring younger girls out on the streets,” said Shannon.  “There’s guys that are tying the girls up for a day or two.  We’re slowly identifying these high risk Johns, I’ll call them. And that’s important for the community.”Charlotte Street in Sydney, known locally as a place where Johns pick up sex trade workersThe other part is about leaving a trail of breadcrumbs in case one of the women goes missing.Shannon is involved in the We Care Project. The idea is to give the women iPods loaded with a Tim Hortons app. The women get free food, and a mental health crisis counselor can keep track of them when they check in using the iPod. Whether it will work, he can’t say.“These girls are all going to fall. They’re going to stumble,” said Shannon.He compares asking a drug addict to change their ways to making a smoker to quit smoking when they’re not ready. Only much worse.“It’s a tremendous sickness,” said Shannon. “If you ever seen someone drying out on opiates, it’s disturbing. It’s like a hangover times 100.”And when people do come out of treatment – a stint in rehab or jail – there’s not much waiting on the other side.“We’re great for giving them food and clothing and everything when they’re on the pills,” said Shannon. “But what do we do when they finish rehab? We kick them out the door and guess what? Nothing in their pockets. No place to live. Nothing. Nothing. Nothing. So guess what? When the old geezer pulls up and says ‘hey darling, $50 for a blow job,?’ It looks pretty easy.”Shannon said what’s needed is an exit strategy.“You put them in that apartment, access to a counselor. Get them a job. Keep them busy and give them goal and visitation to their kids and all of a sudden, things start to get better,” said Shannon.The We Care project is still in its infancy, but there’s a plan to hold community dinners for the women to talk about healthy choices. There’s a lot of players pitching in, including the Eskasoni Crisis Centre, and Mi’kmaq Child and Family Services, Native Alcohol and Drug Abuse Counselling Association.Eskasoni band councilor Dion Denny said it’s a priority for chief and council. Denny himself, was a crisis counselor for six years. He plans to start a soup kitchen in the community in December as one way to help.On a Monday evening at the resource centre in Sydney, eight women sat at their desks in a classroom they’ve set up in the basement of the building, working their way through a book called From Stilettos to Moccasins. On the board at the front of the room are lists of topics they want to cover. From date safety to resume writing.There’s a sense of belonging and acceptance in this space.Raylene Sacobie speaks up in the class, “This is the first time I’ve had a chance. This makes us feel special.”Some of these women are optimistic about their own happy ending.“I feel very proud of myself for being here,” said Sacobie, who started coming to the centre a few weeks ago. “I learned a lot.”Sacobie hopes the program help her land a job. She doesn’t feel isolated anymore and wants to make her father proud.“He may be seven hours away but we talk every single night,” said Sacobie. “I’m sober for me and my father. My father is my rock.”She feels like she lost of a lot of her journey to addiction.“They say you’re on a path your whole life,” said Sacobie. “Mine kind of broke off in so many bad places. But now I feel like its sewn together. Now I feel like I succeeded in my path where I wanted to go.”Not everyone makes it. The women are planning a small ceremony to officially name the resource centre after Jane Paul, a Mi’kmaw woman who died last year from an overdose.“Jane was one of the girls that was very instrumental in saying, you know we need a place,” said Maloney.What happens at the centre is very much dictated by what they women feel they need in terms of services, support and programs. Maloney said Jane Paul was a big part of that and everyone wants to acknowledge her role as a pioneer in opening the centre’s doors.“What Jane was doing, working with the Nova Scotia Native Women, was something her kids should be proud of,” said Maloney. “And we wanted them to know no matter where your mother was in life, she contributed something. And all of these girls here, they’re building this centre up. They’re doing important work. Not just for them but for other women, they’re making this successful.”And in this case, success comes in small steps. Keeping track of the women who are vulnerable. Heidi Marshall hopes that the program helps a couple of them gets jobs. Helping a woman apply for a social security number for the first time. It’s not easy.“I worry about one of the girls that is pregnant right now and she’s being forced into prostitution by her boyfriend,” said Marshall. “And she needs to … I don’t know, I’m just really worried about her.”One of the goals is not just to raise the self-esteem for the women at risk, but to change how the community sees these women too.“People need to know that they’re human beings,” said Marshall. “And that they deserve a chance. That they have goals. That they have hopes and dreams like everybody else.”[email protected] (Heidi Marshall, left, and Raylene Sacobie, middle, smudge at the women’s resource centre in Sydney, N.S.)Trina Roache APTN National NewsA Mi’kmaq resource centre that helps Indigenous women at risk in Sydney, N.S., is at risk itself without more stable funding.This centre opened its doors a year ago and about 20 to 30 women go there on a regular basis to get clean needles, or donated food and clothes – some in the sex trade. Some homeless. Many struggling with drug addictions.But it’s been running on donations and volunteers like Heidi Marshall, of the Nova Scotia Native Women’s Association (NSNWA).“Right now if I wasn’t here, the centre wouldn’t be here, I know that the centre wouldn’t be here 100 per cent,” said Marshall.The president of NSNWA said they opened the centre because they knew it was needed, they just underestimated how much.“It’s been a very difficult year. But … we’re still here. The girls are still here,” said Cheryl Maloney. “We opened our doors on volunteers and donations. We were pretty naïve when we opened the doors and signed the lease. We soon found out there’s issues around security. Mental health training (and) safety protocols.”But no matter the challenge, keeping the doors open is a priority because the women they help face greater challenges.“These girls are on the street,” said Maloney. “They need to be fed. They need to be loved.  They need to be respected. They need help.”Cheryl Maloney speaking to a group of women.Maloney is working to secure funding because she’s concerned their shoestring budget of donations won’t last.After all, this is about the Mi’kmaw women who keep walking through the centre’s doors.Raylene Sacobie spent nearly half of her life addicted to opiates, the main drug of choice in the region.“You wake up and you feel horrible,” said Sacobie. “You feel like your skin’s inside out. My arms were full of bruises.”A near miss with an air bubble in a needle when she was mainlining, was the wake-up call Sacobie needed.The 35-year-old has been clean for a year. For the first time in a long time, she has a place to call home, landing an apartment in the nearby Mi’kmaw community of Membertou.Sacobie laughs and jokes now, but life hasn’t been easy.“Grief tore me apart and then I chose to be numbed,” said Sacobie.She became addicted to opiates after her mother died when Sacobie was 18 years old.“That took a lot out of me,” she said. “When the last words you said to your mother were ‘I you hope you die.’”Sacobie spent the years since haunted by guilt and remorse over the fight she’d had with mother in the days before she died.“It took me 14 years to say, ‘Raylene, it’s not your fault,’” she said.Of those years spent in the fog of addiction, Sacobie described an intense feeling of isolation.“Alone. Unloved. Lost. Couldn’t trust nobody,” she said. “You fall in love so much with that addiction that you ignore everything in life, even the people that love you, you just throw them away.”She’s found a connection at the centre.The women there are open and honest, sharing painful details of their lives, hoping to shed light on a world that’s invisible to many. Hoping to break the cycle.Jeannette Francis wants to pass on what she learned at the centre to other young women who are vulnerable.“To help them go back to school and take them away from what’s out there,” said Francis. “There’s too many people. Drugs, drugs, drugs. And it’s sickening, right? And they’re targeting young girls and guys.”Francis sees the ugly underbelly of life on the streets of Sydney and has threatened to report men who are paying for sex with underage girls. And though she talks about her own struggle with addiction without hesitation, describing a recent encounter with a young Mi’kmaw woman on the streets had Francis blinking back tears.“To me, you just got off a child molester, that’s what I call the man that took you,” Francis recounted telling the young girl. “A child molester, because the girl is under 14 years old. And they only paid her 10 dollars.”Heidi Marshall.Heidi Marshall runs the programs at the centre, keeping the doors open from 3 p.m. to 8 p. m. daily.“My role here is not to change anybody,” said Marshall. “It’s just to support them where they are with their lives right now.”And she’s worked hard to build trust with the women who come through the doors.“Our communities, we have forgotten about the women ourselves,” said Marshall. “They lost trust in us. As First Nation people. As people in our Mi’kmaw community who are supposed to keep them safe and help them. They’ve lost that trust.”Several events in the last two years proved eye-opening for Mi’kmaw communities that sparked the idea of the centre.First, a young Mi’kmaw woman went missing in November of 2014. Chrisma Denny was later found safe in the United States and came home. But what alarmed Cheryl Maloney was that Denny had been missing for weeks before anyone noticed.“She was in the [child welfare] system, she aged out. With the housing crisis in the community, you’re couch surfing, you can end up on the streets, you can end up living high risk lifestyles,” said Maloney. “If there’s no home for you to go to, nobody is going to know if you’re home or not.”So, the centre has computers the women can use to get on social media.“The best tracking for us is for them to be able to come here, check in and let everyone know where they’re at and that they’re okay,” said Maloney.Another event that highlighted the problem happened last year when the Cape Breton Regional Police busted 27 men trying to buy sex in a prostitution sting in Sydney. But the real shock for Mi’kmaw communities was how many of their own women were working in the sex trade. In the spring of 2015, Toronto police made nine arrests in a human trafficking ring with ties to Nova Scotia, involving two Mi’kmaq girls.“They were in the child welfare system and lured out of group homes,” said Maloney. “So there’s a connection; the over-representation of Mi’kmaq, Aboriginal kids in the child welfare system across the country is a risk factor. Homelessness. Poverty. They’re risk factors. Mental health and addictions are risk factors.”RCMP Constable Jeff Shannon has spent much of his career working in Indigenous communities and has experience in particular with missing and murdered women in British Columbia.“I’ve been in the North, B.C, right across this country and to be honest, the majority are uneducated and poor,” said Shannon, referring to women he sees on the streets. “They’ve already been through abuse. Somebody went in and stole a part of their spirit and soul.”Shannon is now based in Eskasoni, the largest Mi’kmaw community on the East Coast, with a population of around 4,000 people. It’s around a 40-minute drive from Sydney of about 30,000 people. Shannon has identified around 54 women in Eskasoni he said are at high risk. That doesn’t mean these women are already in the sex trade, but he sees them as vulnerable and may be heading in that direction.“The problem here,” said Shannon, “you don’t really get to hear of the real kind of serious things. Like, I got a black eye, who cares? These girls don’t care. What’s a black eye?”Shannon said there’s a lack of awareness around the abuse women endure, even among police officers because the young women don’t report it.“The thing is, the girls, they’re so abused,” said Shannon. “That for them to go and get a purse and a meal at McDonald’s from a guy and drive around in a fancy car is pretty huge.”Shannon said the women’s definition of normal a “different line in the sand” than most people.“Violence is their normal,” said Shannon. “So if he smacks you or punches or calls you names or degrades you? Well, you know, last week my family threw me out of the house on the front lawn and threw all my clothes over the front lawn. My father or uncle abused me for eight years and beat me and made me do awful things. So how terrible is that thing that he’s doing to you?”Shannon is quick to point out that this isn’t just an Indigenous problem. But with the lines drawn between things like poverty to a high-risk lifestyle, the statistics in Mi’kmaw communities tell their own story.last_img read more

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