New study finds nearly half of American Muslim doctors feel scrutinized on the job

first_imgWhile many studies have examined the impact of bias based on race, gender or sexual orientation, religious discrimination in the health care workplace has received little research attention. A new study funded by the John Templeton Foundation and conducted at the University of Chicago finds that for Muslim Americans, even those in one the nation’s most highly regarded professions, encounter a less-than-inclusive and welcoming work environment during their career.In a national survey of 255 Muslim American physicians published online this month by the journal AJOB Empirical Bioethics, researchers found that nearly half of respondents felt greater scrutiny at work compared to their peers. Nearly one in four said workplace religious discrimination had taken place sometimes – or more – often during their career. The same percentage of Muslim American physicians believe they have been passed over for career advancement due to their religion. The likelihood of religious discrimination over one’s career was greater among the respondents who consider their religion to be a very important part of their lives.Notably, the study found that neither indications of religious practice (such as a more frequent habit of performing ritual prayer) nor religious appearance (such as wearing a beard or hijab, a headscarf worn by some Muslim women) was associated with perceived religious discrimination at the health care workplace. LinkedIn Email “This national survey of American Muslim physicians provides some encouraging findings regarding the extent to which Muslim religious identity attracts negative workplace experiences, but also some findings that merit concern,” said study author Aasim Padela, MD, MSc assistant professor of medicine and director of the Initiative on Islam and Medicine at the University of Chicago. “It’s further evidence that the acknowledgement of the religious identity of one’s co-workers should be an added focus within workforce diversity efforts that today focus primarily on reducing discrimination directed at racial, ethnic, gender and sexual orientation identities.”This study is the first to examine the relationships between religiosity of American Muslim physicians and workplace discrimination. American Muslims from diverse backgrounds make up about 5 percent of U.S. physicians. With this survey, researchers aimed to uncover any adverse impacts on career satisfaction or job turnover in the health care context given the current political climate and ongoing accounts of Muslim stereotyping in the general population. Recent reports, including a Pew Research Center survey and a Zogby national poll, found Muslims to be the most negatively viewed religious group in America.The findings of this study, researchers say, suggest that data-driven programs are needed to eliminate religion-directed discrimination in the health care workplace.“Achieving an inclusive and diverse workforce requires policies that cultivate respect and accommodation for the religious identity of physicians of minority religions,” said Padela. “American Muslim doctors provide a valued service to this country. If they can’t feel comfortable being who they are in their workplace, we may marginalize them to practice medicine in some locales and not others, and also may create a ceiling on their upward career trajectory or even limit their openness about their identity.“When these things happen, these accomplished, respected members of our society lose some of their ability to serve as positive role models in their own religious communities and more broadly within American society; we restrict their ability to ultimately counter negative stereotypes and create a positive narrative of Muslims in America.”Padela is also a faculty member of the MacLean Center for Clinical Medical Ethics at the University of Chicago Medicine. A former Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Clinical Scholar and Templeton Faculty Scholar, he is internationally recognized for his work on Islamic bioethics and for his empirical research on how religious beliefs, values and identities impact the health care decisions of American Muslims and practice of Muslim clinicians. In 2012, he received the Ibn Sina Award from the Compassionate Care Network of Chicago for his contributions to the field of Islamic medical ethics. Sharecenter_img Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Pinterestlast_img read more

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Interpreting ambiguities in contract documents: RWE Npower Renewables Ltd vs JN Bentley Ltd

first_imgSubscribe now for unlimited access To continue enjoying Building.co.uk, sign up for free guest accessExisting subscriber? LOGIN Stay at the forefront of thought leadership with news and analysis from award-winning journalists. Enjoy company features, CEO interviews, architectural reviews, technical project know-how and the latest innovations.Limited access to building.co.ukBreaking industry news as it happensBreaking, daily and weekly e-newsletters Subscribe to Building today and you will benefit from:Unlimited access to all stories including expert analysis and comment from industry leadersOur league tables, cost models and economics dataOur online archive of over 10,000 articlesBuilding magazine digital editionsBuilding magazine print editionsPrinted/digital supplementsSubscribe now for unlimited access.View our subscription options and join our community Get your free guest access  SIGN UP TODAYlast_img read more

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Hunting/fishing season officially closed

first_img Share Sharing is caring! Tweet LocalNews Hunting/fishing season officially closed by: – January 4, 2013 The Forestry, Wildlife and Parks Division of the Ministry of Agriculture and Forestry has announced the close of the 2012 hunting and fishing season.The season which came to an official end on December 31, 2012 prevents citizens from engaging in hunting and fishing of wildlife.“There is a total ban on hunting; absolutely no wildlife should be hunted until the next time the moratorium is lifted,” assistant forestry officer Ronald Charles told Dominica Vibes News.As of January 1, 2013, the moratorium on hunting of wildlife and fishing in freshwater streams has resumed until further notice. The Division is soliciting the co-operation of all concerned in an effort to managing the wildlife resources of Dominica in a sustainable manner.AgoutiThere has also been an extension for the issuance of export permits for the exportation of Wildlife.“We have allowed an extra grace period for those people who are here for the holidays, who will be travelling back after December 31st, to legally export wildlife. So they have an extra month to travel back,” Charles further explained.These can be obtained until January 31st, 2013.The general public is further reminded that it is an offence under the Forestry & Wildlife Act to hunt or fish in freshwater streams without a valid license.The hunting of the Mountain Chicken, all Birds, and Iguanas is strictly prohibited.Dominica Vibes Newscenter_img Share Share 22 Views   no discussionslast_img read more

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Kameda patriarch may work fight

first_imgThe father of bantamweight Tomoki Kameda will be in his son’s corner at an Aug. 1 WBO title fight in the Philippines, Kameda’s gym announced Saturday.Shiro Kameda, the father of three professional boxers of whom Tomoki is the youngest, was banned for life by the Japan Boxing Commission over a 2007 fight in which his second son, Daiki, repeatedly fouled his opponent. GET THE BEST OF THE JAPAN TIMES IN FIVE EASY PIECES WITH TAKE 5center_img The elder Kameda’s license was revoked in 2010 after he verbally abused officials after his oldest son, Koki, lost a title fight.Although Shiro Kameda is forbidden from setting foot in arenas under JBC jurisdiction, the Kameda gym said the ban is irrelevant when it comes to fights overseas.According to a JBC source, should Shiro Kameda be employed to assist in an overseas bout a JBC qualification review board will be convened to discuss the possibility of perhaps applying the current ban to overseas fights. last_img read more

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Asia Cup: Malinga’s fiver puts Afridi’s ton in the shade

first_imgShahid Afridi’s blistering 68-ball ton wasn’t enough for Pakistan as Lasith Malinga’s first ODI fiver helped holders Sri Lanka win the Asia Cup opener by 16 runs.ASIA CUP: FULL COVERAGE Shoaib Akhtar’s 3-41 upon international comeback helped Pakistan reduce Sri Lanka to 242-9, with Angelo Matthews’ unbeaten 55 bringing some late relief to the home side after a middle order collapse.Malinga and Matthews combined to reduce Pakistan to 32-4 before Afridi led the counter-attack. Dancing down the track to Lankan spinners, the Pakistan captain slammed a 33-ball fifty. [See Scores]He went on to complete a 68-ball hundred battling cramps as Pakistan slipped to 154-6.He was the seventh out at 205, caught brilliantly by skipper Kumar Sangakkara off Muttiah Muralitharan.Abdul Razzaq had been paying Afridi steady company but he was stranded on 26 as Malinga cleaned up the Pakistan tail.In the next game, four-time winners India would play Bangladesh on Wednesday.last_img read more

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CET Suspended On Energy Saving Devices

first_imgThe Government has suspended the Common External Tariff (CET) on 16 energy saving items.Minister of Science, Technology, Energy and Mining, Hon. Phillip Paulwell, made the announcement on Tuesday, February 19, in the House of Representatives.He said Cabinet approved an amendment to the Customs Act to reflect CET exemptions previously granted by CARICOM’s Council for Trade and Economic Development (COTED). The exemption period is for five years from January 1, 2013 to December 31, 2017. Among the items exempted are: compact fluorescent lamps;absorption refrigeration systems including solar equipment and materials;air conditioning chillers andmounting accessories for solar water heating systems.The suspension of the tariff is intended to correct a disparity in the application of General Consumption Tax (GCT) exemptions on 31 energy savings devices by the Ministry of Finance and Planning in June 2012.Minister Paulwell explained that the regime was not consistent as there were cases, for example, where GCT exemptions were placed on solar water heaters and panels but not on accompanying components and accessories.“The Cabinet must be commended for moving to correct the disparities. These developments…will move us closer to achieving the national objectives of reducing our oil import bill, improving the competitiveness of our manufacturers, and in increasing energy efficiency, while encouraging our citizens to be more diligent in managing their own energy use,” Mr. Paulwell stated.Meanwhile, analysis by the Ministry shows that residential electricity demand declined by two per cent in 2012, compared to 2011.This reduction translates into savings of approximately US$1.5 million, the equivalent of 16,000 barrels of oil. Minister Paulwell said the savings could, in part, be attributed to Jamaican’s increased awareness of the importance of energy efficiency and conservation, and the benefits of changing behaviour in terms of energy use.“It is important to note that every dollar saved is a dollar that could otherwise be spent in the country to improve, for example, social services such as health, security, education, among others,” Mr. Paulwell pointed out.He told the House that the Government intends to take the necessary measures to ensure that by 2030, renewable energy technologies contribute at least 30 per cent of the country’s electricity needs.“This may, at first, appear to be an ambitious target, but we feel that especially given the unpredictability of the energy market and the development of new technologies, that this is highly achievable,” the Minister said.last_img read more

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