Euro Parliament under fire following EC 5G vote

first_img Tags Home Euro Parliament under fire following EC 5G vote AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to LinkedInLinkedInLinkedInShare to TwitterTwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookFacebookShare to MoreAddThisMore 04 OCT 2017 Orange Ventures injects €30M into new fund Author Kavit Majithia Kavit joined Mobile World Live in May 2015 as Content Editor. He started his journalism career at the Press Association before joining Euromoney’s graduate scheme in April 2010. Read More >> Read more Orange makes secure cloud pact for French market Vodafone, Safaricom beat MTN to Ethiopia licence Duetsche TelekomEuropean CommissionOrangeTeliaVodafone Related Previous ArticlePreparing to lead in 5G and its key use casesNext ArticleEC takes Ireland to court over unpaid Apple tax Telecoms operators in Europe are at odds with the European Parliament after  proposals designed to encourage investment in 5G and fibre networks were watered down.A European Parliament vote on the matter “undermined” plans proposed by the European Commission (EC) in 2016 which sought deregulation in the sector in exchange for investment, Financial Times (FT) reported.The EC estimated it would cost €500 billion for the continent to emerge at the forefront of 5G, and put forward the plan to encourage operators and other companies to invest in new telecoms networks with confidence, and to address an estimated €155 billion shortfall in the required investment.However, the proposals have not received the backing the EC, or indeed operators, had hoped.Carrots with sticksIn a research note, Barclays Bank said the European Parliament vote had replaced “carrots” with “sticks”, FT reported.Despite calls for degregulation, the Parliament suggested it could actually increase scrutiny on “oligopolies” in the market, where certain large players have too much power, and proposed handing more power to national regulators, thus undermining the EC’s push for a digital single market in Europe.At this stage, nothing is set in stone and the proposals will be negotiated with member states into early next year. However FT noted the EC’s plan could yet be further weakened by member states’ opposition to the introduction of spectrum harmonisation across the continent.Lisa Fuhr, director general of European operator lobby group ETNO, said the European Parliament vote “misses the point” and risks slowing down broadband deployment.A Vodafone Group company representative added the revised proposals increase the “regulatory burden” on companies.Following investments in fibre in Spain and Portugal, Vodafone is proposing to co-invest in networks across the UK with Openreach.“Those amendments, if adopted, would erode investor confidence in European telecommunications,” the Vodafone representative said.The European Parliament also proposed caps on the cost of calls between the EU and other countries, which it described as “abusive”. The push comes after European operators were forced to abolish data roaming fees across the bloc.Telcos urge changeAt an event hosted by ETNO and FT in late September, Deutsche Telekom CEO Tim Hottges and Orange CEO Stephane Richard urged Europe to cut regulation and help the continent in meeting 5G and digitalisation goals set by the EC.Telia CEO Johan Dennelind, in an open letter to European policy makers, also stressed the need for a more ambitious European policy framework.“The European institutions have a pivotal job to do in the coming 6-12 months, the results of which will be studied closely for years to come,” he wrote yesterday (3 October). “We have the opportunity to be the community of leaders which moved Europe onto a higher plane of achievement.”last_img read more

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History Lesson

first_imgHOYLAKE, England – The comparisons were always going to be misguided, if not wildly unfair. This was always going to be a different course than the one that hosted the great Dust Open of 2006. It was, observers concluded, a different swing, a different time, a different Tiger than the one who surgically picked the place apart on his way to his third claret jug eight years ago. Despite that reasoning, those comparisons were sure to come. It is always the burden that when you author a masterpiece fans eagerly await a sequel that is every bit as captivating no matter how outrageous those expectations may be. When Tiger Woods bogeyed the first hole early on Thursday at Royal Liverpool the social universe reminded anyone with a wireless connection that he also bogeyed his first hole in ’06, when arguably the best ball-striking week of his career delivered a two-stroke victory. When he bogeyed the second, however, a chorus of concern could be heard across the Dee Estuary; but slowly, methodically, earnestly, Woods plodded his way back to relevance: A birdie at the par-5 fifth hole from 8 feet to turn at 1 over was followed by a barrage of five birdies in six holes starting at No. 11. Maybe this could be like ’06. Open Championship full-field scores Open Championship: Articles, videos and photos Maybe all that talk of getting his “speed” and “explosiveness” back was starting to resonate. Maybe his short week at the Quicken Loans National – where he returned to action following back surgery on March 31 – was little more than a litmus test and not a long-term indication of things to come. “I’m not going to be the only guy in a 72-hole event to make two bogeys. I just got mine out of the way early,” Woods figured following a 3-under 69 that left him three behind leader Rory McIlroy. The 143rd Open Championship was always going to be compared to that clinic he put on in ’06 regardless of the reality that he entered the week with just 36 holes under his belt since returning from the DL and is some 11 months removed from his last major start. But as a glorious morning progressed, his game, and his championship outlook, improved, just like he said it would. “That’s why I’ve been telling you guys it was so important for me to play at Congressional,” Woods said. “The fact that I was able to recover every day, and the fact that I was stronger, more explosive the more days I played. I’m only going to get better from that point.” When Woods closed his round in increasingly windy conditions, the similarities to his performance in ’06 were eerie. For the day, Woods hit just one driver, at the par-5 16th hole, the same number he hit for the entire week eight years ago. He found 10 of 14 fairways and 14 of 18 greens in regulation, compared to 11 of 14 and 12 of 18 in ’06. He needed 28 putts, one more than he took on Day 1 the last time he played Hoylake. That he did all this after playing his first two in 2 over par also echoed of ’06, when he rounded his final 71 holes in 19 under par. “It felt good to be back out there competing again. It wasn’t exactly the greatest of starts,” Woods said. In fact, the only thing that was missing on Day 1 was a yellow golf course cooked by unseasonably hot conditions to bouncy perfection. But it’s still early. Woods’ rally began at the 11th hole, where he missed the green right from the middle of the fairway with a wedge in his hand and rolled in a 30-footer from the fringe that prompted a fist pump. He followed with a 10-footer at the 12th hole, an 8-footer at the 13th hole and a punched 7-iron at No. 15 to 15 feet before nearly making eagle at the 16th hole. He endured the predictable rub of the green that is as much a part of links golf as fescue and aiming poles when his second at the closing hole found the back of a greenside bunker and he could do no better than par. He even sounded like he did in ’06. “I played what the golf course allowed me to play,” he said on Thursday. Eight years ago after his second round he had a similar take, “It all depends what I feel the golf course gives me,” he said. But perhaps the most encouraging comparison to ’06 was what Woods did after his round. The world No. 7 signed his card, spoke his piece with the press and bolted for the practice tee for an extended session, an option that wasn’t available before he underwent microdiscectomy. “I need to get everything a little bit better. That’s the case all of the time,” he reasoned. Much has transpired in the years since the game’s oldest championship was played on the Wirral peninsula, but for Woods Thursday at Hoylake felt like old times.last_img read more

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ERA declares “Generation Rent” as ownership gives way to subscriptions in entertainment

first_img 0Sign inorRegisterto rate and replySign in to contributeEmail addressPasswordSign in Need an account? Register now. ERA declares “Generation Rent” as ownership gives way to subscriptions in entertainmentDespite slight decline, console spending remains largest physical entertainment sector in UK at £756 millionHaydn TaylorSenior Staff WriterTuesday 5th March 2019Share this article Recommend Tweet ShareUpdated: New digital services have created a “Generation Rent” in the UK, as purchased content yields to subscriptions in terms of consumer spending. That’s according to the Entertainment Retailers Association (ERA) which found that paying to access services instead of owning an individual product accounted for 58.3% of total games revenue in 2018, and it only continues to rise. Comparatively, consumers spent £1.46 billion on accessing video, and £829 million on accessing music. Ownership spending however was just £868 million and £505 million respectively. Access in games includes revenue generated from free-to-play products and isn’t exclusive to subscriptions, like it is in music and film.Overall game spending last year in the UK was £3.86 billion, up from £3.35 billion in 2017. Access spending alone was £2.25 billion, which is roughly half of what was spent on access across games, video, and music combined. “Innovation and investment by digital services and retailers has literally proven a lifesaver for the video, games and music businesses, creating new business models and supporting jobs across the UK creative industries,” said ERA CEO Kim Bayley.Console games remain the largest physical format across all sectors, with nearly £756 million being spent on them in 2018. The segment saw a 2.8% decline year-on-year despite accounting nearly half of half of the £1.61 billion ownership spending in games in 2018. Ownership spending continues to decline across the board, and is outpaced by access spending across all three sectors — in 2018 music spending became predominantly access for the first time. “This is a significant moment,” said Bayley. “For the first time since the birth of the modern entertainment business in the late 1950s, more revenue is coming from payments for access rather than purchase in all three sectors – music, video and games… It is nothing less than a revolution in the entertainment business.”Related JobsSenior Game Designer – UE4 – AAA United Kingdom Amiqus GamesProgrammer – REMOTE – work with industry veterans! North West Amiqus GamesJunior Video Editor – GLOBAL publisher United Kingdom Amiqus GamesDiscover more jobs in games Games first became predominantly access spending in 2016, followed by video in 2017 and now music in 2018. Despite this, games see notable higher ownership spending at 41.7% compared to the 37.2% of video or 37.9% of music.However, with the advent of Xbox Game Pass last year, and Google and Amazon working on similar services, we can likely expect this to accelerate and match other mediums.The industry has already seen the notable effect of Microsoft’s flagship programme, with games like Crackdown 3 proving popular on the service while floundering at retail.Celebrating employer excellence in the video games industry8th July 2021Submit your company Sign up for The Daily Update and get the best of GamesIndustry.biz in your inbox. Enter your email addressMore storiesEA leans on Apex Legends and live services in fourth quarterQ4 and full year revenues close to flat and profits take a tumble, but publisher’s bookings still up double-digitsBy Brendan Sinclair 2 hours agoEA Play Live set for July 22Formerly E3-adjacent event moves to take place a month and half after the ESA’s showBy Jeffrey Rousseau 4 hours agoLatest comments (1)Nick Gibson Director, Games Investor Consulting2 years ago “paying for subscription services instead of owning an individual product accounted for 58.3% of total games revenue in 2018″The only way this is accurate is if the definition of “subscription” includes IAPs, microtransactions and DLClast_img read more

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