Sex trafficker serving life sentence captured after 3 days on the run from Alabama prison

first_imgAlabama Department of Corrections(NEW YORK) — Authorities finally caught up with a convicted sex trafficker who escaped from an Alabama prison this week after he spent over three days on the run.Corey Davis, who was serving a life sentence, was captured at about 3:30 a.m. on Saturday, according to the Alabama Department of Corrections. He was taken into custody in Kentucky by U.S. Marshals. No further information was provided about his recapture.Davis, 30, fled from the St. Clair Correctional Facility in Springville, Alabama, on Wednesday, sparking a statewide search.Officers reported him missing from his cell after a security check around 8 p.m., the department said.Davis was assigned to a work detail inside the prison, and other inmates and staff said they saw him earlier in the day. The department is investigating how he managed to break out.“Agents from the ADOC Investigations and Intelligence Division are at the prison investigating the circumstances that led to the escape,” the department said in a statement. “The details of how Davis escaped are pending.”Davis, sentenced to life in 2017 after he was convicted of human trafficking, is considered dangerous and should not be approached, according to the statement.Officials with the U.S. Marshals Fugitive Task Force are aiding in the search.“The public should not approach Davis but should contact their local law enforcement or the Alabama Department of Corrections at 1-800-831-8825 with information that could lead to his recapture,” the statement said.Copyright © 2019, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.last_img read more

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Emerald ash borer detected in Bennington County

Vermont Business Magazine On July 31st, the USDA Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service alerted state officials that an emerald ash borer (EAB) beetle was captured on a purple detection trap in the town of Stamford, VT. This location is within five miles of another recent EAB detection in the town of North Adams, MA. This invasive insect was first discovered in Vermont in February, and has also been confirmed in Orange, Washington, and Caledonia counties.State and federal agencies are planning a delineation survey based on tree symptoms to determine the extent of the newly detected EAB infestation. Landowners and other residents of Stamford and surrounding towns are urged to look for signs and symptoms of the insect and report suspicious findings on vtinvasives.org(link is external). Detailed information about the pest and what to look for may be found at the same website. As part of an ongoing effort to detect EAB, the USDA has already deployed purple detection traps at 609 locations throughout Vermont. The traps will be removed and examined in September, at the end of EAB’s flight season.Although it may be hard to see, EAB is likely to be present in other locations within ten miles of known infestations. In southwestern Vermont, this includes all of Stamford and Readsboro, as well as parts of Pownal, Woodford, Bennington, Searsburg, Whitingham, and Wilmington.Moving any infested material, especially ash firewood, logs, and pruning debris, can quickly expand the infestation, so it is critical Vermonters follow the ‘slow-the-spread’ recommendations, available at vtinvasives.org/land/emerald-ash-borer(link is external). One important recommendation is to only buy local firewood.EAB larvae kill ash trees by tunneling under the bark and feeding on the part of the tree that moves water and sugars up and down the trunk. It was first discovered in North America in the Detroit area in 2002, and over the past sixteen years, it has decimated ash populations. EAB was recently detected in Maine and Rhode Island and is known to occur in 35 states and four Canadian provinces. Ash trees comprise approximately 5% of Vermont forests and are also a very common and important urban tree. EAB threatens white ash, green ash and black ash in Vermont and could have significant ecological, cultural, and economic impacts.A public information meeting is being planned in the Bennington County area for early September and details will be announced shortly.For more information on how you can help slow the spread:See this current map of the infested zone and find more EAB information at vtinvasives.org(link is external)Spread the word, not the bug by watching this video: https://bit.ly/2lZ9flo(link is external) read more

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‘Murder, She Danced’ At Smith Auditorium Oct. 6

first_imgA detective from the ‘Murder, She Danced’ performance set for 4 p.m. Sunday Oct. 6 at Duane Smith Auditorium. Courtesy/YMCAScene from a previous performance by Dance of India students. Courtesy/YMCA The Family YMCA’s Dance of India performance of ‘Murder, She Danced’ is 4 p.m. Sunday Oct. 6 at Duane Smith Auditorium. Courtesy/YMCA By DIANA MARTINEZThe Family YMCAA student’s suggestion that this 13th year’s performance of The Family YMCA’s Dance of India classes center on something other than a universally known theme, got the instructor to thinking.What should pop into the mind of instructor Alina Deshpande but a a ghost-murder mystery where the ghost makes its presence known through the tinkering of bells. It is a fitting theme for the month of October. The performance is 4 p.m. Sunday, Oct. 6, at the Duane Smith Auditorium.“Nileena gets the credit for coming up with the title of our production,” Deshpande said.Deshpande is the Group Leader of the Biosecurity and Public Health Group in the Bioscience Division at Los Alamos National Laboratory. She began teaching Kathak at the Y in 2003 when her daughter was 6 years old because she wanted to share her culture with her.“She was one of my first students along with three other little girls who were around 4 at the time. They danced with me until they left to go to undergradate school in California, Texas and even Ireland!” Deshpande said. “I was encouraged by my friends to start this class so that other members in the Indian community in Los Alamos could get exposed. I have been continuously delighted and gratified to have diverse members of the Los Alamos community join the class, as it is not restricted to student with Indian origins. This goes to show how welcoming and open our Los Alamosites are!”Deshpande said her class has students that range in age from 5-70.“I have students who have Indian roots as well as those who want to learn a new culture,” she said. “I guess the students love the preparation for these annual shows as well as other performances that we do throughout the year. They enjoy dressing up, too.” Each year Despande supports a charity located in another part of the world.“We started with supporting primarily charities in India, but over the years, it became clear that there are needs all over the world, so it was just something that I realized – why are we restricting ourselves to just one country when we could help so many more,” she said, adding that dollars go much further in other parts of the world and have a very large impact.The one-day performance of “Murder, She Danced!” is supported by parent volunteers who help with stage management.“Mary Beth Stevens, Gauri Prasad and Chris Frankle are so helpful,” Despande said. “I really appreciate their willingness and commitment. I would also like to give a big shout out to my friend Dr. Madhavi Garimella, who in addition to helping with stage management, arranges the intermission sales of snacks and Indian jewelry and clothes, and handles other logistics.”“And I would like to acknowledge my good friend Nileena Velappan, who is also a senior student in class and keeps me energized and inspired! She will do it all from getting costumes for various students, finding sponsors, getting banner permits and being the publicity rep. These are the folks who we don’t all see on stage, but have a big hand in the success of the program. They do it all selflessly and with no expectation of credit or fanfare.”While there is no formal charge, donations are strongly encouraged to support charitable work. This year’s production benefits the YMCA Chiang Mai in Thailand and their Women’s Empowerment program. Suggested donations are $10 for ages 12 and older; $5 for children ages 5-11.Deshpande encourages everyone to come to this fun and colorful event with Indian dances woven into an interesting theme.“We have some serious local acting talent that will be showcased, so this should make for an entertaining evening!” Deshpande said.last_img read more

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Writer’s Block: The Sweet Smell of Spring

first_img Share By DINA ARÉVALOPort Isabel-South Padre [email protected], we’ve had weeks of cold weather, followed by a few days of Indian summer, followed by a few more weeks of cold weather. And then fog. Lingering, day-long fog has plagued the Laguna Madre for so long that I’ve gone from loving the novelty of grounded clouds to being fed up with the sticky dampness and invisible skyline the never ending banks of fog bring.But, if Mother Nature is any indication, all that weather — which is pleasant in its own ways in small doses — is now behind us. How do I know? Well, everywhere I look, there are signs of spring!It started with a pop of warm, creamy white sticking up above the dull greens of the chaparral with its mass of spindly, rugged plants perfectly acclimated to the heat and sun of Deep South Texas. The flash of white came from a yucca plant that had gotten a head start on its brethren. I saw it as I drove down Highway 100 one day and I knew it meant that soon the entire countryside would be dotted with similar sights.Yuccas are always one of the first plants to herald spring in the Rio Grande Valley. From the top of the sharp, knife-shaped blades of their leaves they send up long stems filled with a fat bunch of delicate white flowers.I saw the first yucca blooming just a couple of weeks ago. This week, every single yucca in the area seems to be boasting a bouquet of flowers.And it’s not just the yuccas. Earlier this week I noticed another color complimenting their verdant greens and whites. I caught it out of the corner of my eye, at first — a smudge of yellow-orange. As I looked again I realized that, yes, the shrubby tree which had appeared to be solid green just the day before was now a shade not unlike goldenrod. The mesquites are in bloom, too!It won’t be long now before nopales — prickly pear cactus — begin showing blooms of their own in shades of fiery red orange, magenta and lemon yellow.Yuccas, mesquites and prickly pear are plants that are well suited for the long summers of the Valley, but there’s more to them than pretty flowers. They also have many uses as foods, or in making textiles.It’s not uncommon to see the fleshy pads of nopales served in Mexican restaurants during Lent, for instance. But did you know you can also eat parts of the mesquite tree? And no, I don’t mean using the richly red, cedar-like wood for fueling your barbecue pit, though there is that, too.No, I mean the leaves and the flowers. Both can be made into a tea. As can the pods mesquite trees produce once the flowers go to seed. I can remember playing outside my grandmother’s house as a child and idly sucking on mesquite beans, savoring their sweet, tamarind-like flavor.Likewise, yucca flowers are edible, as well. One popular way to eat them is scrambled with a couple of eggs. That’s one recipe I have yet to try myself, though.Want the whole story? Pick up a copy of the Port Isabel-South Padre Press, or subscribe to our E-Edition by clicking here. RelatedWriter’s Block: Adventure GardenBy DINA ARÉVALO Port Isabel-South Padre Press [email protected] Maybe it was the cold we experienced this winter. I love cold weather days, but in measured doses. Maybe it was the weeks upon weeks of fog. I love the fog, too. But, as with winter, fog is a treat I like to…March 30, 2018In “News”Writer’s Block: Thar She Blows!By DINA ARÉVALO Port Isabel-South Padre Press [email protected] It’s officially been ‘winter’ for a while now, but it wasn’t until this past week that we truly saw some wintry weather. Now, sure, we’ve had a couple of cold fronts blow through during the 2016-2017 winter season already, but they’ve all been…January 13, 2017In “Editor’s Column”Writer’s Block: Small ObservationsBy DINA ARÉVALO Port Isabel-South Padre Press [email protected] Sometimes I struggle with what to fill this space with every week. Kind of paradoxically, when your options are nearly limitless, you can suddenly find yourself at a loss for what to do. Having too many options can occasionally feel just as constricting…March 1, 2019In “Editor’s Column”last_img read more

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Aldred, Reynolds Named to NSCAA D-II All-South Team

first_img Matthew Aldred and Sean Reynolds were named to the NSCAA D-II All-South Team Aldred, Reynolds Named to NSCAA D-II All-South Team KANSAS CITY, Kan. – Seniors Matthew Aldred (Eastbourne, England/Loughborough (St. Bede’s Senior School) and Sean Reynolds (Fort Walton Beach, Fla./Fort Walton Beach HS) of the West Florida men’s soccer team were named to the NSCAA Division-II All-South Team, it was announced by the NSCAA.Aldred started all 18 matches for the Argonauts this season logging 1477 minutes on the pitch, third most on the team. The England native tallied four goals and 11 points with one game winning goal, which came in the 104th minute of overtime against Gulf South Conference opponent Delta State. Aldred was also named to the All-GSC First Team and the GSC All-Tournament team.Reynolds started 17 matches for UWF this season and logged 1598 minutes on the pitch, second most on the team. The Fort Walton Beach, Fla. native recorded two goals and two assists with a game winning goal, which came with 20 seconds left in regulation against Alabama-Huntsville in the GSC semifinal. Reynolds was also named to the All-GSC First team for the second consecutive year, to the GSC All-Tournament team and was named the GSC Player of the Year.To keep up with UWF men’s soccer in the off season and for information on all UWF Athletics, visit www.GoArgos.com. NSCAA D-II All-South TeamPrint Friendly Versioncenter_img Sharelast_img read more

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Amazon Prime greenlights third season of ‘The Boys’

first_imgAmazon Prime(LOS ANGELES) — The Boys are back on Amazon Prime. Even before its second season premiere, the streamer has renewed the superhero vigilante drama for a third season, according to Variety.  Season two will also present an after-show, titled Prime Rewind: Inside The Boys, hosted and executive produced by Aisha Tyler. The after-show will start on August 28 with a recap of the series so far. Based on the comic from Garth Ennis and produced by Seth Rogen and Evan Goldberg, the series centers on a group of egotistical — and in some cases sociopathic — superheroes, and a group of mortals led by Karl Urban’s Billy Butcher who are intent on taking them down.The Boys launches September 4, three episodes, with an additional five episodes premiering weekly through October 9. By George Costantino and Stephen IervolinoCopyright © 2020, ABC Audio. All rights reserved.last_img read more

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KIJHL governors reject expansion application by Williams Lake, Quesnel

first_imgA bid to add two more teams to the Kootenay International Junior Hockey League was rejected by governors during a special meeting Sunday in Castlegar.KIJHL President Bill Ohlhausen told The Nelson Daily the governors “decided this was not the right time to expand.”“The governors felt that maybe at another time expansion would better fit the league, but right now they did not vote in favour of expansion,” Ohlhausen explained.last_img

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Blomqvist overnight leader for Classic Rally

first_img0Shares0000Stig Blomqvist-Day 03 EASR 2013NAIROBI, Kenya, Nov 23 – Competitors arrived at Ol Tukai Lodge bruised and battered on Thursday recounting a tough start to the 2017 Kenya Airways East African Safari Classic Rally.Overnight leader Stig Blomqvist of Sweden talked of a very tricky first day especially in the first section where most of crews got stuck in one of the mud holes. “Overall am happy to be back here to defend the title I won last time,” Stig said.Despite the conditions, oldie Dinesh Sachania of Kenya also returned to the Lodge in Amboseli enthusiast of his run.He said: “The second stage was good and the long section was tough with a lot of corrugation. We are not thinking a lot about tomorrow (Day Two)  just taking it a day at a time.”Nick Mason of GB had a great run and managed to get through everywhere. “For us it was a good day. However it was very disappointing in the length of time that we were left out baking in the sunshine, waiting for decision to be made. Thank God for the second stage, it was absolutely fantastic which brightened up everyone for the day.”Kabras Sugar Racing ace Tejveer Rai of Kenya had probably more downs than ups. “We got stuck in both the stages. Apart from that we lost a lot of time. The waiting didn’t affect us too much but you feel the concentration going off a bit, but that’s the part of the challenge.His teammate Baldev Chager of Kenya had a very challenging and extremely tricky day despite wrapping up his first day in third.“I think we were very lucky not to get stuck in stage 1 that’s why we had a good stage time. Looked forward to stage two but we had an issue with the fan belt. It snapped 5km and we had to be very careful which lost us a bit of time.”Eight more days to go, it’s a rally that can catch you out and can be good to you or be very cruel. Of course we have to do our best as a Kenyan entry but we have stiff competition from the likes of Stig, but it should be good fun.”Carl “Flash” Tundo had an electrical fire before even the first stage and we had to rewire the car losing about a minute and a half.“The times we set were all top 10, and we are in the same minute with Stig. The good thing is that the officials made good decisions with the times and I commend them. We have done a lot of work on the Triumphs and I think the fire was caused by putting the tracking unit the wrong way but it’s all sorted now.”Onkar got stuck behind a lot of cars in the mud holes but besides that he had a good day. “However we lost gears and we didn’t have 4thgear but we still got good times. Would have been better. As for the whole Kabra’s team, we are talking together and we just have to make sure we get to the end.Italy’s Steffano Rocca talked of a very nice race and nice first day. “Unfortunately in the morning we had to wait. In the first stage I got stuck in a mud hole and got stuck there for almost an hour and a half.The second section was great I had two cars that slowed me down a bit but ended up wel. The car is more than fantastic and better than the last classic rally, my team has done a fantastic job on the car.”Tim Mammen and his teammate Keith Henrie  were going on very well and got through the mud holes at least in the beginning.“At some point I got an overtake request. Unfortunately I pulled up to far on the left side and ended up stuck permanently in the mud. So we spent half an hour stuck. Rocca tried to pull us backwards, didn’t work, but we later got help but we baked in the sun for 3 hours. The 2nd stage was great and we had fun in it.”Cementers Kenyan driver Ramesh Vishram talked of a good day, “but such a pity that the first stage had an issue but all in all its been a good start, besides the wet conditions but I thank God that we managed to go through. Second stage was rough with a lot of wash outs and had to be extremely cautious. The car has minor issues which they will sort out tonight before the second day.”0Shares0000(Visited 1 times, 1 visits today)last_img read more

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