Two serious accidents, one fatality over the weekend

first_imgRenewable energy program expanding to businessesHeat records falling twice as often as cold onesYou Might Also LikeFeaturedNewsBobadilla rejects Santa Monica City Manager positionMatthew Hall8 hours agoNewsCouncil picks new City ManagerBrennon Dixson19 hours agoFeaturedNewsProtesting parents and Snapchat remain in disagreement over child protection policiesClara Harter19 hours agoFeaturedNewsDowntown grocery to become mixed use developmenteditor19 hours agoNewsBruised but unbowed, meme stock investors are back for moreAssociated Press19 hours agoNewsWedding boom is on in the US as vendors scramble to keep upAssociated Press19 hours ago 1 Comment Because the city is too damn crowded!!! Deal with reality people. Walking and biking is NOT SAFE IN SM!!!! Deal with it or move!!!! I moved!!! March 20, 2019 at 2:01 AM MW says: HomeFeaturedTwo serious accidents, one fatality over the weekend Mar. 19, 2019 at 7:20 amFeaturedNewsSanta Monica CollegeTransportationTwo serious accidents, one fatality over the weekendMadeleine Pauker2 years agoaccidentsfatalityTake the Friendly Roadvision zero Two people were hit by vehicles in Santa Monica last weekend, with one collision resulting in a fatality.On Friday night, a man fell off an electric scooter and died after being struck by a vehicle in Ocean Park. Two days later, a teenage girl riding a bicycle was hit by a Metro bus in front of the Santa Monica Public Library.The man, 41, was riding a personally owned electric scooter – a City Hopper, manufactured by Bike Rassine – south on 3rd Street between Hill Street and Ashland Avenue after 8 p.m. when he fell onto the road, according to the Santa Monica Police Department (SMPD). A vehicle also traveling south hit him. The driver got out of his vehicle but fled the scene before first responders arrived.The man suffered significant head and body trauma and died shortly after he was transported to a local hospital in critical condition.The vehicle is an older, off-white or tan sedan, possibly a Toyota Camry with damage to its front passenger’s side. The driver is a white man in his 30s and is 6 feet 2 inches tall with a medium build. He has a shaved head or short hair and was wearing prescription glasses.The investigation is ongoing and investigators are interested in speaking with anyone who was in the area near the time of the collision. Anyone with additional information is encouraged to contact Investigator Scott Pace at (310) 458-8954 or SMPD at (310) 458-8495.The Notre Dame High School student was an experienced bicyclist and was riding in the bike lane to the library Sunday afternoon when the bus struck her, her family said. She was conscious when Santa Monica Police Department (SMPD) officers arrived at the scene at about 2 p.m., said Lt. Saul Rodriguez.Santa Monica saw an uptick in traffic fatalities and accidents in 2017 – nine people died, up from an average of four to five each year – but zero people died in traffic collisions in 2018. Still, 40 percent of residents feel uncomfortable navigating city streets, according to a recent City of Santa Monica survey.The City launched a Vision Zero road safety initiative in 2016, following cities like Los Angeles and San Francisco, branding the campaign with the slogan “Take the Friendly Road.” City planners have been making changes to intersections, bike lanes and crosswalks, as well as deploying citywide safety advertising, to reduce collisions, with a goal of zero fatalities by 2026.Pedestrians and bicyclists make up 70 percent of traffic fatalities on average and accidents are mainly caused by drivers who fail to yield, speed or drive under the influence, said principal transportation planner Jason Kligier.Correction: The original version of this article incorrectly stated the cyclist attends Santa Monica High School. In fact, she attends Notre Dame High [email protected] :accidentsfatalityTake the Friendly Roadvision zeroshare on Facebookshare on Twittershow 1 comment Comments are closed.last_img read more

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Kok, McNabb tied at PGA Professional National Championship

first_imgMYRTLE BEACH, S.C. – Johan Kok shot a 5-under 67 on Sunday to match The Dunes Golf & Beach Club competitive record and share the first-round lead in the PGA Professional National Championship. Kok, the 34-year-old former University of South Carolina player from South Africa, is the PGA general manager at Temple Hills Country Club in Brentwood, Tennessee. The top 20 will get spots in the PGA Championship at Valhalla in August in Louisville, Kentucky. ”This is a chance to play in a major,” Kok said. ”It may not happen for me this week after all is said and done, but I’m happy to be here and get that chance.” Dave McNabb, the 48-year-old PGA head professional at Applebrook Golf Club in Malvern, Pennsylvania, opened with a 67 at Grande Dunes Resort Club. ”I feel today that I took advantage of a fantastic golf course that was set up to score,” McNabb said. ”Conditions were ideal. I’m looking forward to heading to The Dunes tomorrow and trying to do the same. You have to be in the right spot on the greens.” Kok one-putted 11 greens at The Dunes, the site of the final two rounds in the 72-hole tournament. He matched the course record set by Billy Joe Patton in the 1960 Southern Amateur and Ben Crenshaw in the 1973 PGA Tour Qualifying School. The Senior Tour Championship, conducted at The Dunes from 1994-1999, used a shorter yardage when Jay Sigel shot a 63 in 1994. Jamie Broce of Ottawa Hills, Ohio, and Ryan Helminen of Menasha, Wisconsin, shot 68. Broce, the men’s golf coach at the University of Toledo, and Helminen, a PGA teaching professional at Ridgeway Country Club in Neenan, Wisconsin, played at The Dunes.last_img read more

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What’s in the tangled pipelines for Europe?

first_imgThe EU’s failure to notice the obvious is breathtaking. As for its efforts trying to avert what, to everyone else, is evidently coming next, forget it.  The horror of Gaza, for instance, has unfolded like a car-crash in slow motion. As for the latest Russia-Ukraine imbroglio over gas, were our political leaders celebrating too hard on New Year’s Day, as they were in 2006, to notice Gazprom switching off Ukraine’s gas supplies? It did not do so for long then, but enough to remind everyone how cold life can get without heating. The economic slump is likely to kill off that EU-US scheme, which was already making private investors jumpy. Threats of ‘another Georgia’ also discourage this sort of scheme, as does the steady subversion of EU energy utilities, a process sometimes known as ‘self-invasion’. Russia or its proxies take large shareholdings in these, then make sure EU states are locked into long-term Russian energy contracts. If, as many experts predict, some of these contracts cannot be honoured, then what better winter sport for Gazprom and friends than watching EU states fighting it out with one another? A typical – and for me shameful – nail in the coffin of EU independence was the deal with Putin signed by Greek Prime Minister Kostas Karamanlis in April 2008. The following month Bulgarian Prime Minister Sergei Stanishev signed too. 2008 was not a proud spring for the South. But there is a plentiful supply of useful or simply greedy idiots throughout the Union, Schröders, Karamanlises, Kouchners and Stanishevs galore, according to a recent study, ‘The EU’s attitude towards Russia: condemned to be divided?’, by Stefano Braghiroli and Caterina Carta. It categorises EU countries according to their level of loyalty towards Russia: “eastern divorced”, “loyal wives”, “vigilant critics” and, the most disturbing, “acquiescent partners”. Could there be a better playground for Russia than Europe? The excuse then was allegedly unpaid bills and the happy political outcome – for Vladimir Putin at least – was in effect to block Ukraine’s bid to join NATO. Now we are back in the same place. The EU of course claims credit – its favourite activity – for a new agreement reached on Monday, 19 January, which may or may not hold. But the real point is different: that the EU cannot afford to be forever dependent on the vagaries of Russian geopolitical games. Not that they are vague at all, really. Russia’s planned Nord Stream gas pipeline under the sea to Germany, avoiding the Baltic states, is a neat divisive move. Even more elegant was the appointment of Gerhard Schröder, the rascally former German chancellor and a Putin crony, as head of the Nord Stream shareholders’ committee. A South Stream under-sea pipeline is planned to pump an annual 30 billion cubic metres of Russian gas to Italy via Bulgaria, Greece, Serbia and Croatia, while a branchline will run through Serbia and Hungary to Austria. The precondition of this entirely coherent strategy, as most ten-year-olds could work out, is to block, or make an economic nonsense of, EU and American attempts to by-pass Russian or Russian-controlled energy supplies such as the EU’s flagship Nabucco project to get Caspian gas to Vienna. last_img read more

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