20 days agoMan Utd boss Solskjaer delivers Pogba injury update

first_imgMan Utd boss Solskjaer delivers Pogba injury updateby Paul Vegas20 days agoSend to a friendShare the loveManchester United boss Ole Gunnar Solskjaer admits he is unlikely to call upon Paul Pogba for the trip to Newcastle on Sunday.Pogba has had a nagging ankle problem since United’s 1-1 draw at Southampton at the end of August and missed France’s Euro 2020 qualifiers against Albania and Andorra.He was also unavailable for the Red Devils in fixtures against Leicester and West Ham before starting games against Rochdale and Arsenal. Asked if he would have any key players back from injury for the weekend, Solskjaer said: “I don’t know. Let’s see on Saturday morning. Probably not.”On Pogba being fit for Sunday, the Norwegian added: “Probably not, there’s an international break as well, so it might be time for us to give him 10 or 14 days extra to be ready for the Liverpool game.” About the authorPaul VegasShare the loveHave your saylast_img read more

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Notre Dame Wore “Fr. Ted” Patches Last Night Against Louisville To Honor Father Theodore Hesburgh

first_imgA closeup of Notre Dame's mascot during a basketball game.NEW YORK, NY – MARCH 08: The Notre Dame Fighting Irish mascot cheers on the court during a timeout against the South Florida Bulls during the quarterfinals of the Big East Men’s Basketball Tournament at Madison Square Garden on March 8, 2012 in New York City. (Photo by Chris Trotman/Getty Images)On February 26, the Notre Dame community lost one of its finest members, Rev. Theodore Hesburgh. Hesburgh, or Father Ted as he was known, served as the school’s president from 1952-1987 and had an incredible impact on the community. Wednesday night, the men’s basketball team paid tribute to Hesburgh.The Fighting Irish wore “Fr. Ted” decals on their jerseys, and officially dedicated their win over Louisville to his memory. Check it out:We are proud to dedicate tonight’s win to the memory of Fr. Ted. #ThankYouFrTed pic.twitter.com/QEL8ehGDpq— Notre Dame MBB (@NDmbb) March 5, 2015Our thoughts and prayers go out to Hesburgh’s family and friends.last_img read more

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Excessive Sugar a Clear and Present Danger

first_img The health dangers of too much added sugar in the diet was among matters discussed at the Food and Agriculture Organization’s (FAO) Regional Conference for Latin America and the Caribbean, held recently in Montego Bay.According to conference officials, consuming an excessive amount of sugar continues to be a major health issue throughout the region and is a major contributor to non-communicable diseases (NCDs) such as diabetes and obesity.For Minister of Industry, Commerce, Agriculture and Fisheries, Hon. Karl Samuda, excess sugar in the diet is a “clear and present danger”.“When I was a little boy growing up, we used to drink sugar and water…that was the cheapest thing. All we did was mix the sugar with the water and it quenched the thirst. But we have gone beyond that stage now where we have to be far more discriminatory about what we consume,” he pointed out in an interview with JIS News.He noted that many persons are consuming too much sweet foods and drinks and are now suffering the consequences.“The fact of the matter is that we are having a serious problem and it ends up costing us in healthcare,” he said.He is imploring persons to cut back on their sugar intake. “Most of us who are in the habit of having two teaspoons of sugar in our coffee should try and reduce that to one,” he suggested.“We have to pay attention to the nutritional value of the food. It is not a matter of asking people to deny themselves of things that they want to eat. We just have to be smart and know that there are health risks that can be fatal,” he pointed out.Excessive sugar contributes to high blood pressure and raises the risk of heart disease. Research shows that raised blood glucose accounts for 21 per cent of heart disease and 13 per cent of stroke mortality worldwide, amounting to about 3.16 million deaths a year.Sugar can also suppress the immune system, leading to conditions such as arthritis, allergies, asthma and multiple sclerosis, and impair defences against Candida or yeast infection.Mr. Samuda said the FAO has and will continues to lead the fight to promote healthy eating in order to reduce diet-related conditions.He further noted that the time has come for a serious sit-down with manufacturers of sweet drinks and other items with heavy sugar content to see how best the sugar can be minimised.“We have to take this into question,” he says. “We produce sugar locally and we use it in our drinks and baked products. We have to find some common ground where we do not undermine the integrity and taste of the products,” he pointed out.In the meantime, Director General of the FAO, Dr. José Graziano da Silva, said that so serious are the problems resulting from heavy sugar intake that some counties have barred the sale of certain products in school canteens.“Other measures have also been implemented to counter what is a serious global problem and one that the FAO takes very seriously,” he noted.“We have to, in a responsible way, implement policies. Everyone, from governments, families, consumers, makers of products, have to come together to have a complete review of what is happening and also the way forward,” he added.He noted that diabetes is a big problem across the LAC region, fueled not only by high sugar intake but also poor lifestyle habits.“There has to be a change in our health habits and the way we market our foods to the consumers. There will be resistance, for sure, but we have to be steadfast in our approach,” he pointed out. Story Highlights For Minister of Industry, Commerce, Agriculture and Fisheries, Hon. Karl Samuda, excess sugar in the diet is a “clear and present danger”. The health dangers of too much added sugar in the diet was among matters discussed at the Food and Agriculture Organization’s (FAO) Regional Conference for Latin America and the Caribbean, held recently in Montego Bay. “When I was a little boy growing up, we used to drink sugar and water…that was the cheapest thing. All we did was mix the sugar with the water and it quenched the thirst. But we have gone beyond that stage now where we have to be far more discriminatory about what we consume,” he pointed out in an interview with JIS News.last_img read more

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Chris Farleys family settles bikename lawsuit

first_imgMADISON, Wis. – Trek Bicycle says the family of the late “Saturday Night Live” star Chris Farley has settled a federal lawsuit against the Wisconsin-based company for naming its fat-tired bikes Farley.Trek spokesman Eric Bjorling tells The Associated Press the settlement was reached Wednesday.Terms are confidential, but Bjorling says Trek can continue making Farley bikes.The lawsuit alleged Trek misappropriated Farley’s name and traded on his “fat guy” brand of comedy.Chris Farley was born and raised in Madison, about 30 miles (50 kilometres) from Waterloo, where Trek is based. He died in Chicago in 1997 from a drug overdose.An attorney for Make Him Smile, a company founded and run by Farley’s family to protect his publicity and property rights, did not immediately respond to a request for comment Wednesday.last_img read more

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Trudeau says Canada wants to see movement before signing revised NAFTA deal

first_imgWASHINGTON – Thirteen months is an “absolutely normal” time frame for a task as complex as modernizing North American trade, Foreign Affairs Minister Chrystia Freeland said Wednesday as she notched another day on the road towards a new NAFTA deal with the United States and Mexico.On a day where signs of progress were in the air, Freeland shrugged off talk of congressional deadlines and growing impatience in political circles as she justified the amount of time it has taken for all three sides to get to their current positions.Rome, in other words, wasn’t built in a day.“For an agreement of this scale, 13 months for a very deep modernization of the kind we’re working on is absolutely normal,” said Freeland, who will be back for more talks Thursday. “Trade agreements do take some time, both to negotiate and to update, because the economy is complicated and trade agreements are complicated.”And when asked whether she could hear the clock ticking, she said: “Canada’s sole objective — the only target that we are aiming for — is getting a good deal for Canada, so that’s what we’re focused on.”Among the evidence that the finish line isn’t far away: word from sources familiar with the negotiations that the U.S. backed off in recent weeks on its demands for lucrative procurement projects.Then there was the mood of Freeland herself, who arrived in the U.S. capital the night before wearing a T-shirt from her kids emblazoned with the slogan, “Keep Calm and Negotiate NAFTA,” and thanked journalists for keeping vigil and ordinary Canadians for their expressions of support.“People come up to me on the street or in airports, which is where I am often found, just saying how strongly they support Canada in these complex negotiations,” she said before a midday meeting with Ontario Premier Doug Ford, in town to wave the Team Canada flag.“I just want to say to everyone who has done that, thank you very much. It means a lot to me. I always share your messages with the negotiating team, and that gives us real strength and reminds us of how important the work we’re doing is for Canadians.”She credited Mexico with making significant concessions in its deal with the U.S. on automobiles and for permitting large wage increases for Mexican auto workers — something Canada and the U.S. both wanted to stop the growing flow of automobile production into Mexico because of its cheap labour.“Over the summer, Mexico made some very deep, very difficult concessions on rules of origin,” she said, referring to an early U.S. demand that would have dramatically increased the amount of American content required in cars built outside the country.“The fact that Mexico made those concessions is good for higher-wage workers; good for the high-wage workers of Canada, good for the high-wage workers of the U.S., and that is what allowed the rest of the negotiations to move forward.”And there was the all-nighter pulled by one of Canada’s negotiating teams, which Freeland said didn’t wrap up its marathon session until 7 a.m. Wednesday morning. “There is some very intensive work happening,” she acknowledged as she thanked negotiators, too, for their tireless efforts.Sources say Mexico believes it has also done much of the “heavy lifting” on getting the Americans to back down on its demand to limit the ability of Canadian and Mexican firms to bid on U.S. infrastructure projects, while seeking greater access for American firms to Mexican and Canadian government projects.Mexico and Canada are both quietly taking credit for standing firm against the controversial U.S. position that would have effectively limited their respective countries’ ability to bid on valuable American government infrastructure projects.Earlier in the day in Ottawa, Prime Minister Justin Trudeau said Canada isn’t backing down from its own demands — a position that has some U.S. legislators bristling at what they consider a stalling tactic.“We’ve been very clear that we’re interested in what could be a good deal for Canada, but we’re going to need to see a certain amount of movement in order to get there,” Trudeau said.Pressure is mounting on the federal government to get a deal done. On Wednesday, Texas Republican Kevin Brady, head of the influential House Ways and Means committee, told CNBC the two sides are “close enough” and the time has come for Canada to “step it up” and get on board.Trade observers say that while many in Congress want Canada to be part of a three-way deal, they may not be willing to sacrifice an agreement in principle between Mexico and the U.S. negotiated earlier this year.That deal is widely seen to require congressional approval before Dec. 1 in order to survive the arrival of an incoming Mexican government whose supporters have mixed feelings about the agreement.Jerry Dias, head of Unifor, Canada’s largest private-sector union, said Canadian negotiators remain unmoved by the recent rumblings on Capitol Hill and focused on getting a deal that’s in the country’s best economic interests.While Canada has been pushing for wording in NAFTA aimed at strengthening labour protections and gender equality, the overall negotiations are said to have stalled over Canada’s insistence that an agreement contain an independent dispute-settlement mechanism.“There’s not going to be an agreement where disputes are handled in the American courts. Why would we do that?” Dias said.“Having Colonel Sanders take care of the chickens — in other words, having all disputes handled in the U.S. courts — just doesn’t make any sense for Canadians.”— With files from Mike Blanchfield in Ottawa— Follow @CdnPressStyle on Twitterlast_img read more

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