Australia promises sweeping reform to address rampant industry misconduct

first_imgGavel and legal books olegdudko/123RF Volcker Rule revisions meet with U.S. industry approval Big banks bolstered by reforms: FSB Pandemic at top of global regulators’ agenda James Langton Australia’s government is promising action to restore confidence in the financial industry, following a Royal Commission inquiry, which found widespread misconduct by the industry at the expense of customers.The Royal Commission into Misconduct in the Banking, Superannuation and Financial Services Industry published its final report today, which sets out a series of 76 recommendations for reform to address the pervasive exploitation of the industry’s customers. Related news “Saying sorry and promising not to do it again has not prevented recurrence. The time has come to decide what is to be done in response to what has happened,” the report says, in setting out a series of recommendations that aim to bolster consumer protections; increase accountability and governance standards; enhance the effectiveness of regulators; and improve access to remediation for victims of industry misconduct.Among other things, the report points to compensation schemes that solely reward sales, the lack of best interest standards, and an absence of accountability for misconduct as some of the core issues identified in the review.“Rewarding misconduct is wrong. Yet incentive, bonus and commission schemes throughout the financial services industry have measured sales and profit, but not compliance with the law and proper standards,” the report says.It points out that customers have little to no ability to negotiate the terms of transactions with the industry, due to the huge imbalance in market power and knowledge. The report also highlights the prevalence of conflicts of interest. “The interests of client, intermediary and provider of a product or service are not only different, they are opposed,” it says. “An intermediary who seeks to ‘stand in more than one canoe’ cannot.”Moreover, it says that efforts to manage those conflicts invariably fail. “[E]xperience shows that conflicts between duty and interest can seldom be managed; self-interest will almost always trump duty,” it says, adding that it heard evidence that conflicts are almost always resolved in favour of the industry, and against clients’ interests.Additionally, when industry firms violate the law, they are not properly held accountable, the report concludes. “Misconduct will be deterred only if entities believe that misconduct will be detected, denounced and justly punished. Misconduct, especially misconduct that yields profit, is not deterred by requiring those who are found to have done wrong to do no more than pay compensation. And wrongdoing is not denounced by issuing a media release,” it says.In response to the report, Australia’s treasurer, Josh Frydenberg, pledged that the government will take action on all of the report’s recommendations.“In outlining the government’s response to the Royal Commission, the government’s principal focus is on restoring trust in our financial system and delivering better consumer outcomes, while maintaining the flow of credit and continuing to promote competition,” he said.The report follows 68 days of public hearings and more than 10,000 public submissions into financial industry conduct.“My message to the financial sector is that misconduct must end and the interests of consumers must now come first. From today the sector must change, and change forever,” Frydenberg added.To test whether that happens, the government also pledged to launch an independent inquiry in three years to assess whether industry practices have changed following the Royal Commission and are producing better consumer outcomes. Keywords Financial services reform,  Australia Share this article and your comments with peers on social media Facebook LinkedIn Twitterlast_img read more

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April 1, 2008 Letters

first_imgCourt Funding Sen. Victor Crist’s statement, as reported in the March 1 News, that the courts might have “intentionally” set themselves up to a position where they would have to close their own doors, just for the purpose of stimulating “panic at home” is disrespectful to those dedicated to public service who often do so for less than can be earned in the private sector. The statement also reflects a misguided notion that justice can be administered like a bakery makes cakes. A cake is baked according to a recipe or it will not be edible. Once funding falls below a certain level, the court will not be able to provide its essential core functions. People will have to take a ticket and wait in line at the courthouse on the days it may be open. Justice delayed is justice denied. Despite the continued loss of funding since Revision 7 to Art. 5, all citizens who walk through the courthouse doors have to be served on court matters such as orders for protection against domestic violence, child support, spousal support, protection of the elderly, protection of children, protection of those suffering from mental illness or drug addiction, protection from those who have broken the laws of the state, and on and on. How can you explain to a needy woman who has received no support from her husband for herself or her children why she has to wait three months or more for 30 minutes of her judge’s time to get a court order for support? The judicial branch should have special priority. The legislature should pay careful attention to the legitimate concerns voiced publicly by Chief Justice Fred Lewis about the severe harm the budget cuts will do to the judicial branch. Taxpayers ought to hear about what the impact will be on their lives. They ought to hear about the court’s likely inability to process their divorce case, their child support case, and their business cases if there is no money to pay enough judges, magistrates, case workers, and support staff to get the work done. Taxpaying voters ought to know which of their elected officials take this potential harm seriously and which think it is a ruse made up to scare people. Certainly the courts have to deal with the reality of economic downturn. However, the budget cuts have a disproportionately heavy impact on the courts. Despite the fact that access to our courts is fundamental to our democratic society and the incredible volume it handles, this branch receives less than 1 percent of the entire state budget. The courts already struggle with not having enough money. If the doors to the courthouse close, it will be due to lack of adequate funding from our elected officials in the legislature. Holly Gayle Gershon Boca RatonAttorney-Client Privilege I read with interest the February 15 News story concerning public lawyers needing stronger attorney-client privilege rules. The article and the attitude of the Bar’s Attorney-Client Task Force was extremely disappointing. Having litigated for and against government for the past 40 years, it is essential that the public be entitled to as much access to public records as possible. If a public attorney has given an honest opinion to their government client, then there should be no problem with that opinion being disclosed once the litigation is complete. The public is entitled to know if government is acting in an honest way. keeping secret records the government may be allowed then to act in a way that is detrimental to the interests of its citizens. The legislature showed tremendous insight in adopting public records laws, which allow the public to review the work of government officials to determine whether they are acting in the citizens’ best interests. There is no reason to prevent discovery of work product of an attorney employed by government, once litigation is complete. There is no reason not to have a transcript of a meeting between government attorneys and their public clients. I see no reason not to allow expert witnesses and others to appear at these meetings. A transcript would disclose whether government acted in good faith. Government is different than private parties and needs to be treated differently. There is no difference between a party obtaining “voluminous” public records during discovery and after the discovery process. A person who is not party to a lawsuit could still request these records. The process for providing the records would still be the same. In reading task force member Marion Radson’s comments, he states, “Erosion of the attorney-client privilege marginalizes the role of the lawyer and the lawyer’s ability to protect liberty and pursue justice.” It is my understanding that the justice being pursued by government should be on behalf of the public; therefore, any effort to limit the public’s right to know exactly how its government acted is actually in derogation of liberty and the pursuit of justice. While there may be some areas of the public records laws that need tweaking, if anything, records and transcripts following litigation should be kept absolutely part of the public records. Unfortunately, in matters such as these those who are fighting for continued public records are many times not part of a concerted effort. We are not government lawyers and therefore aren’t necessarily organized to fight for or against these kinds of issues until they actually come up for consideration by the Bar or the legislature. We need our elected Board of Governors to act on our behalf. Louis Kwall ClearwaterDiversity Picnic Despite a torrential downpour, over 300 guests attended the first ever Central Florida Diversity Picnic, held at Stetson College of Law’s Tampa campus, to celebrate and encourage diversity in the legal community. The impetus behind the idea was the annual minority mentoring picnic that has been held in Miami since 2003. I figured it would be great to hold a similar picnic in Central Florida and to invite minority law students to Tampa who wished to practice. I approached John Kozyak, who developed the concept for the South Florida picnic, about my idea and asked his permission to borrow his concept. Mr. Kozyak indicated that he supported the idea. In the fall, through a collaborative effort of The Tampa Bay Hispanic Bar, the Hillsborough County Bar’s Diversity Committee, the George Edgecomb Bar Association, and the Sarasota County Bar Association’s Diversity Committee, we were able to secure a $5,000 grant from The Florida Bar Foundation to help fund the picnic. The Bar’s Young Lawyers Division also pledged an additional $5,000. After months of preparation and through the hard work of my co-chair for the picnic, Devon Stoney, Michele Revels, and Colleen Pruitt of the Hillsborough County Bar, the members of the Diversity Committee, and many volunteers, the picnic went off without a hitch (except for the weather). Everyone enjoyed the ethnic entertainment, which included African dancers, a bamboo orchestra, and a reggae band. For lunch, picnic-goers had their choice of delicious barbecue or Spanish food, as well as cookies, vegetable crudités, cotton candy, and popcorn. When the rain let up, kids got a chance to play on the bouncy slides, have their faces painted, or have a drawing done by a caricature artist. I would like to thank our sponsors and everyone who helped turn an idea into a successful event. We are already starting to plan next year’s picnic. If you are interested in sponsoring or volunteering for next year’s event, please contact me. United States Magistrate Judge Mary Scriven, who attended the picnic with her husband, Lance Scriven, promises that she will talk to her father, who is a minister, to ensure that we do not have rain for next year’s picnic. I look forward to seeing you in the sunshine in 2009. Luis A. Cabassa TampaADA Training After reading David Petrano’s letter in the March 1 edition of the News, I was stunned. He calls the tragic events at the Hillsborough County Jail “state-sponsored disability-bashing.” The terrible actions of that individual were certainly not encouraged or sanctioned by the sheriff’s department. According to Mr. Petrano’s logic, any state employee who commits a crime on the job would be “state-sponsored” as well, despite policies in place or punishments after the incident. The accusation that The Florida Bar “deliberately calculated” discrimination against the disabled is offensive. I find it exceedingly hard to believe that the Board of Governors sits in a room dreaming up ways to make life harder for the disabled. The statement that all attorneys share in the culpability of the attack at the jail erodes the development of our profession as a whole. The Bar does not require training in dependency law. Does this mean that every attorney is responsible for the parent who abuses his child? Of course not. To surrender to this would result in endless CLEs in every niche area with no relevance to a given attorney’s field. Why should the eminent domain specialist or the criminal defense attorney be forced to train in how to file ADA lawsuits? I applaud those who practice in that important field. But do not force me to needlessly engage in training at the expense of worthwhile CLEs that advance my ability to practice in my own area. I understand and share Mr. Petrano’s outrage at the actions of the individual at the jail. But neither the Bar nor the attorneys it governs could possibly be responsible for the illegal actions of an individual. David M. Gould TampaForeclosure Crisis Thank you very much for the News’ focus on foreclosures. Hopefully lawyers across the state will be energized to take interest and get busy learning how to defend foreclosures, and putting their skills to the test in their communities. At Jacksonville Area Legal Aid, the success of a case for a family facing imminent foreclosure is measured from the first day that work begins to maintain the status of homeownership. The case numbers that appear in the March 1 article represent the combined hard work of every employee of the consumer unit at JALA. Also, Wachovia only accounted for 100 of the foreclosure starts in Jacksonville from January — October 2007. The top 10 foreclosers were: Deutsche Bank National Association at 675; Wells Fargo Bank National Association at 557; US Bank National Association at 549; Bank of New York at 360; HSBC Bank at 238; JP Morgan Chase Bank at 213; LaSalle Bank at 134; Citimortgage at 129; Wachovia Bank at 100 and GMAC at 93. These banks and formidable institutions need to focus their goodwill and funding on the communities devastated by foreclosures and reach out locally to prevent foreclosures and to stomp out predatory mortgage lending and servicing. April Charney Jacksonville Area Legal Aid There are lawyers and nonlawyers who could do much to help in the home foreclosure crisis gripping Florida and choking the dockets of our court system. They are mediators. If the circuit court judiciary would get together and order mediation of foreclosures within 30 days of filing instead of at the other end of the process, many of these cases could be resolved. There are scores of certified circuit civil mediators who would serve at substantially reduced rates if these cases were set in numbers and at times that would lend themselves to prompt attention. The requirement that a person representing the owner of the mortgage be present at mediation would eliminate the nonpersonal, out-sourced debt collector problem that seems to block some meaningful effort to work-out a nonforeclosure solution. Settlement rates are in the neighborhood of 75 percent for most court-ordered mediated matters; anything close to that could make a big difference for the industry and the court system. Jim Crowder Miami In response to the March 1 News story concerning Alex Sink, Florida’s chief financial officer, and her request for more lawyers to be involved in the pro bono area of mortgage foreclosures and request for more attorneys to consider public service, I suggest Ms. Sink wake up and smell the coffee. If she thinks a salary for an attorney of $130,000 per year, who also undoubtedly receives medical insurance, disability benefits if needed, and a vested retirement plan, is not enough to raise a family, she has no clue what is going on with Floridians whose homes are being foreclosed. As a sole practitioner, I have and continue to provide pro bono in both state and bankruptcy court and I can assure you few, if any, of the people who receive pro bono services and whose homes are being foreclosed are making $130,000 per year with benefits. I have been licensed in this state for 30 years and I continue to be surprised by government officials who are clueless as to the fate of so many Floridians. the way, Aetna Insurance just sent me my premium notice for renewal of my health insurance for my family, which is in excess of $35,000 for one year. At that rate I may need my own pro bono services. James B. Boone Weston April 1, 2008 Letters April 1, 2008 Letterscenter_img Letterslast_img read more

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People Moves: Capita Real Estate, Goodwin, Lodders and more

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The selective approach

first_imgSubscribe to Building today and you will benefit from:Unlimited access to all stories including expert analysis and comment from industry leadersOur league tables, cost models and economics dataOur online archive of over 10,000 articlesBuilding magazine digital editionsBuilding magazine print editionsPrinted/digital supplementsSubscribe now for unlimited access.View our subscription options and join our community Stay at the forefront of thought leadership with news and analysis from award-winning journalists. Enjoy company features, CEO interviews, architectural reviews, technical project know-how and the latest innovations.Limited access to building.co.ukBreaking industry news as it happensBreaking, daily and weekly e-newsletters To continue enjoying Building.co.uk, sign up for free guest accessExisting subscriber? LOGIN Subscribe now for unlimited access Get your free guest access  SIGN UP TODAYlast_img read more

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Indian Railways faces testing times, says minister

first_imgINDIA: Presenting the Indian Railways budget for 2011-12 to Parliament on February 25, Minister of Railways Mamata Banerjee warned that IR was facing a ‘testing time’, citing a significant jump in fuel costs, and wage increases imposed following a review by the Pay Commission. With 1·4 million employees and 1·2 million pensioners, the increases are expected to add Rs730bn to IR’s expenditure over the current five-year period.Nevertheless, Banejee expects IR to achieve an operating ratio of 92·1% for the current financial year which ends on March 31, with gross receipts of Rs971bn, expenditures of Rs881bn and interest payments to the state of Rs49bn leaving a surplus of Rs41bn.Although freight traffic levels are running below budget at 924 million tonnes rather than 944 and 612 billion tonne-km instead of 623 billion, this is not reflected in the financial results. Freight revenues for the year are now projected to reach Rs625bn, a 6·8% increase over 2009-10. Passenger traffic levels remain on target, with passenger earnings for the year expected to be up by 11·2% at Rs261bn.For 2011-12, IR has budgeted for a 7% increase in freight traffic to 993 million tonnes, and a 6·4% increase in passenger earnings. Banerjee says total receipts should reach Rs1 062bn, giving an improved operating ratio of 91·1%.In terms of capital spending, the minister announced IR’s ‘highest ever plan investment’, totalling Rs576·3bn in 2011-12. This will cover the acquisition of 18 000 wagons, construction of 1 000 km of new lines, 867 km of double-tracking and 1 017 km of gauge conversion.Nevertheless, the budget reveals that IR has been eroding its Depreciation Reserve Fund for asset replacement, drawing down funding for capital expenditure and development faster than it is appropriating funds. Whereas IR allocated Rs70bn for depreciation in 2008-09, this fell to Rs45bn the following year and Rs57bn in 2010-11; Rs70bn has been budgeted for 2011-12.Our correspondent also reports little evidence of any long-term strategy to streamline the rail sector or to restructure IR, to cut costs and rationalise tariffs, or to engender the confidence needed to encourage private investment. Instead of increasing lower-class fares, where IR is currently losing around Rs200bn a year, the minister continues to demand increased service levels which add to the financial burdens and erode the capacity needed to handle profitable freight business.last_img read more

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ipl 2020: Brad hogg picks the teams which are capable of…

first_imgCSK will be difficult The Chennai Super Kings, led by three-time IPL champions MS Dhoni, will have a tough time this season. CSK will have to do well with Delhi Capitals to reach the play-offs in fourth place. The older column will be a setback for CSK. “If Rabada plays all the matches for Delhi Capitals, he is more likely to reach the top four,” Hogg said. This time Suresh Raina and Harbhajan Singh are not playing for CSK. While the absence of Harbhajan will not significantly affect CSK, the absence of Raina is sure to be reflected in the batting.Kolkata Knight RidersKolkata Knight Riders are likely to finish third. This time they have the best balanced team. There are people in KKR who can shine with bat and ball like Narine. Narine is a player who can be used as an opener, midfielder and finisher. The presence of Andre Russell also strengthens Kolkata. Hogg has previously played for KKR. KKR, led by Dinesh Karthik, is a great choice. The pace strength of Pat Cummins and Loki Ferguson is also with the team this time.RCB will reach the playoffsRoyal Challengers Bangalore will reach the play-offs in second place. Their coaching staff is excellent. That’s why I think the players can put out a great performance without pressure. And it will be a great season for them when Aaron Finch joins Virat Kohli. The RCB, which has the best players of all seasons, has yet to win the title. This time around, the RCB pace has strengthened with the addition of players like Schotten and Chris Morris. The backbone of the team is Kohli, Finch and De Villiers.Mumbai is at the helmHogg says defending champions Mumbai Indians will top the points table. They are the best in every way. Has a great batting line-up. Krunal Pandya, Kieron Pollard and Krunal Pandya are some of the big names in Mumbai. Mumbai have the best bowling line-up with spinners and pacers alike. Mumbai, led by Rohit Sharma, are aiming for their fifth title this season.last_img read more

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“Clash of horse flesh” leads to marriage

first_imgHome  »  General  »  “Clash of horse flesh” leads to marriage “Clash of horse flesh” leads to marriage PHILIPPA Johnson-Dwyer and James Dwyer finally got married this year, 12 years after first bumping into each other on horseback.Some people get together after their eyes meet across a darkened room. Some meet online, and others may meet through work or mutual friends.In the case of newlywed para-equestrian dressage riders Philippa Johnson-Dwyer and James Dwyer it was, as Dwyer admits, “not so much eyes across a room, more a clash of horse flesh.”Their marriage, however, was a long time coming.They first met 12 years ago, at the Para-Equestrian Dressage International in Moorsele, Belgium. There, Johnson-Dwyer, fresh off the plane from South Africa, found herself in the training arena with Irish rider Dwyer.“Coming from South Africa we rode to the right,” Johnson-Dwyer explained. “I had never been to Europe and rode to the left, and every time I went into the warm up arena it was at the same time as James and I kept bashing into him, the poor guy.”Even though they met so long ago, however, a case of mistaken identity meant that the pair did not realise their feelings for each other for some time.Johnson-Dwyer, a two time Beijing 2008 Paralympic gold medallist, explained: “I remember seeing a wedding ring and I knew the hand it was on was Irish and I just always thought it was James. I thought ‘this is a really nice guy but, bad luck, he’s married’.“That went on for eight years of us knowing each other, and we’ve since found out that we would look for each other at shows and chat but I just thought ‘married man, sorry’.”It was not until the 2010 Alltech FEI World Equestrian Games in Kentucky, USA, that Johnson-Dwyer finally realised Dwyer was not married. The pair were talking when Johnson-Dwyer mentioned that she thought he was married and finally found out he was not.After that revelation, it was still a further two years before the couple finally got together. In 2012, Dwyer came to Europe to compete and qualify for the London Paralympic Games (where he won a bronze medal).He said: “I had to do three competitions so I flew my horse over from America. In Moorsele, Philippa was stabled beside me and, now she knew I wasn’t married, we were very chatty. We were both half an hour from Eindhoven so I asked her if I could visit her.”“I panicked,” laughed Johnson-Dwyer. “The first thing I did was phone my best friend and said ‘This man is coming for a whole day. What do I do with him?’.”Both admit that 2012 was probably the worst time in their careers to start a relationship. They had the Games to prepare for and Dwyer was still planning to return to the US after the summer. But, he added: “After that first day that I came to visit I knew. She was riding her gold medal horse Benedict and I was standing outside. I could see the future a little bit and I had to stop myself and say ‘oh no James you don’t want a long distance relationship’ so I went back to America and we straight away started to email each other and it started from there.”The couple finally married early this year and are now based in Belgium where they have plans to develop and run stables specifically for riders from far afield to base themselves for each summer’s European competitions.Story and picture courtesy of paralympic.orgThe Dwyers 3 April 2015, 00:24 Tags: James Dwyer, Philippa Johnson-Dwyerlast_img read more

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Ger Linehan the President’s man

first_img2nd Yui Bietry (11) 39pts3rd Tim Hickey (5) 38pts4th Ed Wyckoff (10) 38ptsB Flight1st Pat Regan (12) 36pts2nd John Nalty (13) 36pts3rd Jerry McCarthy (13) 35pts4th Pat Hanafin (13) 34ptsC Flight1st Ger Linehan (17) 44pts2nd Nick Odnoral (17) 40pts3rd David Dune (19) 34pts4th Tony Dolphin (19) 32ptsD Flight1st Mick Coghlan (22) 37pts2nd Jez Lees (19) 33pts3rd John O’Neil (19) 32pts4th John Bassett (21) 32ptsNear Pins: No 4 Max Scott, No 9 John Hartigan, No 12 Vic Hester, No 16 Peter LeNoury.With every available slot of the 20 tee times taken, the society teed it up for the President’s golf tournament and Colin and Jimmy Elphick welcomed a large group of competitors to this popular event.  The weather was fine and the course was in splendid condition; the only hick up was the lack of caddies.Billy Briton was a double winner during the week.‘Broad more’ Bob, one of the pre-tournament favorites, had to pull out at the last minute because of business commitments so the spare place was filled by the Scribe.  I must say it was like old times, playing in the same four-ball as the Principal in D Flight. So that’s where we will start.Mick Coghlan was the top provider with a solid 37 points followed by, would you believe it, the Principal 5 shots in arrears, who edged the net count back duo on 32 points of John O’Neal and John Basset.  Mr. O’Neal has been on the podium too many times to lose a count back and proved it again this time.The Irish flight, usually known as B Flight, was topped by the young man from Co. Dublin, Pat Regan and good friend John Nalty, both with decent par rounds.  Pat had the better of his mate on count back while Jerry McCarthy was but a shot adrift for the bronze.  Pat Hanafin and Victor the infector were tied a shot back as the luck of the Irish held up in the count back to make it an Irish flight rout.The big boys flight provided some excellent scores as Aussie Bob Watson led the flight with a high class 41 points.  Bob’s score contained five birdies and a eagle on the par five 16th hole.  Any other day this score would probably have won  but it was good for the lead crystal second place trophy.  Yui ‘the Belle of Pattaya’ fired a very creditable 39 to fill the silver spot.It took a three-way 38-point count back to fill the third and forth spots between Jim Hickey, Ed ‘our man in the White house’ and Monsieur Thierry Petrement.  Count back dictated that they climbed the podium steps in that order but there was no step for the unlucky Thierry.C Flight, which has taken a bit of stick from the Scribe lately, produced the overall winner and the third placed golfer.  Irishman Ger Linehan amassed an incredible 44 points to take the President’s lead cut glass trophy for 2013 and he also collected two 2’s and a trip to the handicap committee.  Nick Odnoral took the second flight place and the third overall spot with an excellent 40 point return.  David Dunne was third with 34 points as Tony Dolphin closed the flight with 32 points.Back at Lewiinski’s and after the presentation it was party time as everybody tucked into Lewiinski’s famous buffet.  Finally Jim thanked all who helped make it a day to remember, especially the Lewiinski’s staff.  Next year’s comp is an eagerly awaited event.Monday, Jan. 21, Crystal Bay – StablefordA Flight1st Jonny Lindberg (11) 37pts2nd John Feehan (16) 36pts3rd Tim Hickey (5) 36ptsB Flight1st Ayoka Pueschi (23) 39pts2nd Ronny Valfridsson (21) 35pts3rd David Dunne (19) 30ptsIt was off to Crystal Bay today and that suited our Japanese lady golfer Ayoka Pueschi down to the ground as she returned the top score of the day, a delightful 39 points in B Flight to take the match honours.  Ayoka was four clear of second placed Ronny Valfridsson and a further five clear of David Dunne.A Flight was tight as just one point separated the top three players.  Jonny Lindbergh sneaked the top spot with a creditable 37 points, closely pursued by Irishman John Feehan and Tim Hickey on even par rounds, with the former having the better of the count back.Jim Bell, Ayoka Pueschi and Tom Morrisroe shared the 2’s pot.Wednesday, Jan. 23, St. Andrews – StablefordA Flight1st Bob Watson (2) 40pts2nd Thierry Petrement (11) 40pts3rd Max Scott (3) 39ptsB Flight1st Billy Briton (15) 37pts2nd Vic Hester (14) 35pts3rd Mike Jeffreys (18) 35ptsC Flight1st David Dunne (19) 34pts2nd Ken Kelly (19) 34pts3rd Mick Coghlan (22) 34ptsDesmond Muirhead’s monster always seems to intimidate the society, but on saying that, a rather large group showed up to take it on – 55 players in fact.The senior circuit pair of Aussie Bob Watson and Monsieur Thierry Petrement showed no fear as they led the way with 40 faultless points apiece and Bob gaining his second man of the match award as Thierry’s count back woes remain.  Max Scott’s purple patch continues as he closed the flight.  (Michele Sancillo, Peter Kelly and Terry pork chop Mangan deserve a mention as they carded fine rounds of 38 points) each.B Flight was led by Irishman Billy Britton with a solid 37 points.  Vic ‘the inflictor’ Hester was true to his handle as he edged Mike ‘the Welsh Wizard’ for the silver.A group of luminaries were knotted atop the C Flight as the old count back was dragged out and the log jam was quickly sorted.  David Dunne completed a hat trick of podium places for the week as his 34 point return had the best back nine math’s.  Ken Kelly took the second place as Mick Coghlan tidied up the flight.Bob Watson, Michele Sancillo, Peter Kelly and Steve Armstrong shared the 2’s pot.Friday, Jan. 25, Mountain Shadow – StablefordA Flight Blue1st Billy Briton (15) 34pts2nd Mark Watson (6) 34pts3rd Michele Sancillo (9) 34pts4th Tom McManus (11) 33ptsB Flight Blue1st Ayoka Pueschi (23) 36pts2nd Marjatta Tikkala (23) 35pts3rd Brian Price (20) 35pts4th Gerry Roche (18) 34ptsA Flight White1st Michael Lenihan (18) 38pts2nd Ed Delaney (26) 38pts3rd Frank McNamara (17) 36pts4th Peter Henshaw (19) 30ptsCompetition suspended due to mental illness! – well not quite but strange things happen when the golf manager is late on the first tee, as he was this day.  Somehow a fair percentage of the field took a short detour to the land of Zog and hit off from the white tees.  Not to be outdone, the remainder teed off the blue tees since the starting sheet was nowhere to be seen.  Good work lads.  Back at Lewiinski’s Colin somehow sorted it out.Michael Lenihan and Ed Delaney in C Flight, or white, or it might be blue or possibly the Irish flight, whatever they were co men of the match with 38 points each.  Big Frank McNamara took the bronze with a steady even par round while fourth place went to a triple count back as Peter Henshaw, John Heaney and Mike Dwyer all carded 30 points – Peter’s backside math’s prevailing.Ayoka Pueschi foreshadowed a week on form with her B Flight, just might be blue, winning 36 points.  Second was simply a matter of count back as Marjatta Tikkala edged Brian Price for the silver.  Gerry Roche, Mike ‘the Welsh wizard’ Jeffreys and John O’Neil pushed the calculator to the limit with Gerry emerging the victor in fourth spot.Some other flight (up to you) didn’t know if they were coming or going and were headed by the man on form Billy Briton, who won a three-way count back over Mark Watson and Michele Sancillo who took silver and bronze respectively.  The McManus boys were the last count back the calculator managed as Tom got the better of Paraic.Peter Henshaw, Barry Power Whitish! Pat Hanafin and Brian Price True Blue shared the 2,s pot.Note:  Lewiinski’s is situated on Pattaya land Soi 1, Beach Rd Soi13/13 near Walking Street.  Anyone wishing to play with us just pop in and add your name to the list or call Colin on 089 826 0764.  Transport is provided PSC golf from Lewiinski’s Golf SocietySunday, Jan. 20, Green Valley – Presidents TrophyA Flight1st Bob Watson (2) 41ptslast_img read more

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#Blackgirlmagic takes spotlight at Olympics

first_imgPHILADELPHIA (AP) — Andrea Lawful-Sanders has a ritual for cheering the Black heroines of the Summer Olympics.She gets into her corner of the living room, sets up her chair, demands silence before screaming at the top of her lungs, flails her body wildly and — in keeping with her Jamaican-American heritage — bangs pot covers together to celebrate victories.United States’ Simone Biles performs on the balance beam during the artistic gymnastics women’s individual all-around final at the 2016 Summer Olympics in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, Thursday, Aug. 11, 2016.  Many of the Olympics’ most memorable moments have come courtesy of African-American women athletes who have accounted for more than a dozen medals in 14 days of competition. (AP Photo/Rebecca BlackwellFile)From Simone Biles’ gravity-defying flips to the history-making medal trifecta of the U.S. women racing in the 100-meter hurdles, many of the Olympics’ most memorable moments have come courtesy of African-American women. Their accomplishments in Rio have spurred excitement and pride at home in the U.S., particularly for Black women who say they are seeing themselves in the Olympic Games like never before.“While everybody else is talking, we are doing,” said Lawful-Sanders, 50, of Philadelphia. “When we excel, nobody can take that away from us — ever. They may try to marginalize us, but how can you marginalize excellence?”With competition continuing through Sunday, America’s Black female athletes have won more than two dozen of the 100-plus U.S. medal haul.Black women haven’t just shined in this year’s Olympics; they’ve been ubiquitous — from gymnastics to water polo, fencing to swimming. Previous Summer Games featured Black women mainly in track and field and, more recently, in gymnastics. Fans at home had to wait days to cheer on sprinter Florence Griffith Joyner or gymnast Dominique Dawes.United States’ Simone Manuel competes in a women’s 100-meter freestyle semifinal during the swimming competitions at the 2016 Summer Olympics, Wednesday, Aug. 10, 2016, in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. (AP Photo/Martin Meissner) “It is very interesting to see Black women going into areas where you really don’t see Black women competing, with all different body shapes, complexions and hairstyles being represented,” said Kaye Wise Whitehead, a professor at Loyola University who studies race and gender. “Black women see and feel that there is no door closed to us … and that we’re not just walking through those doors, but we’re dominating.”In Rio, the two Simones — gymnast Simone Biles and swimmer Simone Manuel — both stood atop the podium on a night that made history, with Manuel becoming the first Black woman to win an individual medal in swimming. In all, she took home four medals and Biles five. Biles was chosen to carry the American flag for the U.S. team in Sunday’s closing ceremony.In this Aug. 12, 2016 file photo, United States’ Michelle Carter competes to win the gold in the women’s shot put during the athletics competition at the Summer Olympics at Olympic stadium in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. Carter became the first American woman to win gold in the shot put. (AP Photo/Matt Dunham, File)Michelle Carter became the first American woman to win gold in the shot put. Fencer Ibtihaj Muhammad, who won a bronze medal in the women’s team sabre event, was the first Muslim-American woman to compete for the U.S. in a hijab.In this Aug. 13, 2016 file photo, Ibtihaj Muhammad celebrates a point during her women’s team sabre fencing semifinal against Russia at the Summer Olympics in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. Muhammad, the first Muslim-American woman to compete for the U.S. in a hijab, won the bronze. (AP Photo/Andrew Medichini, File)On the track, Dalilah Muhammad became the first American woman to win gold in the 400-meter hurdles, and three Black women — Brianna Rollins, Nia Ali and Kristi Castlin — became the first Olympians from the same nation to finish 1-2-3 in the 100-meter hurdles.Jacqueline Wills has loved rooting on female gymnasts since she was a child watching the Olympics. During these games, as she lost count of the numerous Black women winning, her cheers went beyond just Biles.Dalilah Muhammad from the United States jumps final hurdle to win the gold medal in the women’s 400-meter hurdles final during the athletics competitions of the 2016 Summer Olympics at the Olympic stadium in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, Thursday, Aug. 18, 2016. (AP Photo/Jae C. Hong)“At this point, it’s like too many to name,” said the 38-year-old who lives in Brookhaven, Georgia. “It’s the same reason we cheer Michelle Obama when she does something fabulous: It’s (a Black woman) doing things well and on their own terms and being unapologetically Black. Those images kind of reaffirm us.”Some said the Olympics also provided a much-needed respite from racial tensions at home.“It is a good distraction and a good way to celebrate our successes, even as the world may not appreciate us,” said Luvvie Ajayi, a pop culture blogger and author. In a Facebook post, Ajayi quipped: “Black women had a secret meeting before #Rio2016 and the only thing on the agenda was: ‘TAKE ALL THE MEDALS.’ And it was done.”“Black women are showing that we’ve always been a force to reckon with, but now … we’re showing that we kind of are superheroes that are real,” Ajayi said in an interview. “We are really unstoppable; we can dominate at anything we want to do.”Black women have also felt the struggles of their athletic counterparts at the games. Many took to social media to defend veteran gymnast Gabby Douglas amid remarks that she lacked patriotism for not placing her hand on her heart during the national anthem, that her hair was not polished enough and that her attitude was unsportsmanlike.The stereotype of the “angry Black woman” was familiar to Wills.“That is one of the things that comes with being a Black woman in this country,” she said, adding that she tried to shrug off the criticism in a Facebook post.“I said, ‘People are just mad at her bold lip,’” Wills said, referring to Douglas’ lipstick color.As the games come to a close this weekend, Lawful-Sanders is warming up her pot covers for a few more chances to cheer.“We have made up our minds that we are going to give it the best that we have, and we are watching it manifest in the Olympics,” she said. “It’s Black girl magic. We are tired of being told that we couldn’t or we shouldn’t. … We’re taking no prisoners, and I’m enjoying every second of it.”___Errin Haines Whack covers urban affairs for The Associated Press. Follow her on Twitter at http://www.twitter.com/emarvelous and read more of her work at http://bigstory.ap.org/journalist/errin-haines-whacklast_img read more

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