Army blames strong economy for missing recruiting goal

first_imgiStock/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) — For the first time in thirteen years the Army has failed to meet its annual recruiting goal and Army officials believe the strong U.S. economy is partially to blame.The Army failed to meet its recruiting goal of 76,500 new recruits for fiscal year 2018, bringing in 70,000 recruits — an 8.5 percent shortfall from this year’s goal.“About 70,000 Americans joined the Regular Army in FY18, the most to enlist in a single year since 2010 – and every single recruit either met or exceeded DoD standards,” said Hank Minitrez, an Army spokesman. “The Army will fall short of its 2018 recruiting goal.”The last time the Army failed to meet its recruiting goals was in 2005 at the height of the war in Iraq.The 70,000 is actually more than the recruiting goals for the three other military services combined, but as the largest service, the Army always has the biggest recruiting challenge.What’s behind the shortfall? “A strong economy, and a lower propensity among the population of 17- to 24-year-olds to enlist are challenges we face,” said Minitrez.“Only 1 in 4 [of the] 17- to 24-year-olds in the nation are actually qualified to enlist, and of those, only 1 in 8 have a propensity to enlist,” said the Army spokesman. “All of those factors make for a difficult recruiting environment.”Army officials have cautioned since early this year year that it was possible the service might not make this year’s initial recruiting goal of 80,000 — a significant increase from recent years.From 2013 to 2017 the Army met lower recruiting goals set that varied from 56,000 to 67,000 as the service downsized its numbers.But a requirement to increase its total size led to a much larger recruiting goal for 2018. This past spring the goal was lowered from 80,000 to 76,500 after higher than expected numbers of re-enlistments eased personnel requirements.But the service faced criticism that in order to meet its goals it was increasing the number of waivers granted to some recruits who would normally not be eligible to enter the Army in strong recruiting periods.Through August, 2018, Army statistics show that the number of waivers for positive drug and alcohol tests had increased to 1.05 percent, up slightly from the .79 percent granted in 2017.Waivers for major misconduct waivers also increased to 2.88 percent during that same time frame, up from 2.38 percent in 2017.Army officials have maintained that the service is still committed to recruiting only qualified applicants.“We made a decision to raise the quality of our recruits despite the tough recruiting environment,” said Minitrez. “As we look to 2019 and beyond, we have laid the foundation to improve recruiting for the Army while maintaining an emphasis on quality over quantity.”Copyright © 2018, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.last_img read more

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2 sworn in as Notre Dame’s 1st full-time female firefighters

first_img WhatsApp Google+ Pinterest Facebook Twitter SOUTH BEND, Ind. (AP) — Two women have been sworn in as the University of Notre Dame Fire Department’s first full-time female firefighters.The South Bend Tribune reports 42-year-old Michelle Woolverton and 37-year-old Christi Shibata started as firefighters over the summer with the department, which got its start 140 years ago.The department’s Fire Chief Bruce Harrison said they have passion for the job, empathy and a determination to serve others.Woolverton joined the department in 2010 as an on-call EMT. She later worked for the university’s Building Services department and says: “I just love helping people.”Shibata joined the department as a part-time firefighter in 2018 after previously working at a physical therapy clinic in Petoskey, Michigan. She says she “always wanted to be the one who can lend a helping hand.”___Information from: South Bend Tribune, http://www.southbendtribune.com IndianaLocalNewsSouth Bend Market Facebook Pinterest By Carl Stutsman – September 23, 2019 0 233 2 sworn in as Notre Dame’s 1st full-time female firefighters Google+ WhatsApp Twitter Previous articleBREAKING: Part of SR. 23 Closed Due To Water Main BreakNext articleOne Man Shot in Benton Township Carl Stutsmanlast_img read more

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Bowman bolstered by Johnson’s early support, now takes over as his successor

first_imgWhen Alex Bowman joined Hendrick Motorsports for the 2018 season, he played along with the mistaken impression that he was a promising Cup Series rookie — even though already he had two-plus years of experience in NASCAR’s top division. Bowman was in on the joke, if only because his actual rookie season was forgettable; he scratched the top 20 just once for heavy underdog BK Racing and finished 35th in the 2014 driver standings.Bowman was about as far away on the grid as he could be from Jimmie Johnson, who had just sealed the sixth of his seven championships the year before. But Johnson often made it a point to check in with the series’ newer faces during pre-race ceremonies, and his uplifting words helped sustain Bowman as he raced hard in relative obscurity.RELATED: Catch up on the latest Silly Season news“I was talking about the race that had taken place the week before at just how hard I saw him driving the car,” Johnson recalled. “He was totally sideways, I could see his left-front tire and how active he was behind the wheel, just trying to hang onto it and still going forward. I remember approaching him and being like, ‘Man, I can’t believe you held onto that car and were able to save it and drive it.’ He’s definitely grown up running on the dirt, and I could tell that day when I saw him wheeling the car.”Somewhat improbably, the two drivers became Hendrick Motorsports teammates four years later and Tuesday, Bowman was introduced as Johnson’s successor in the No. 48 Chevrolet. But their bonds developed into a friendship that was a source of motivation during Bowman’s times of career uncertainty.“He was the first guy to come up to me and be like, ‘Hey, man. You’re doing a really good job with what you have to work with,’ at a time when I was really unsure of my career and didn’t know how things were going to go, wasn’t really having a whole lot of fun,” Bowman says. “That encouragement kept me going for quite a while, so to be able to take over a car from him is really special.”Bowman said the two drivers chatted earlier this week to discuss the impending news and how his move to a new team and new sponsor might play out. “More than anything, I just wanted him to know that I’m here,” Johnson said, indicating he would remain close to the No. 48 team next year, even as he leaves full-time Cup Series competition after this season.Bowman will have some continuity as his pairing with crew chief Greg Ives will remain in place, but he’ll again be a new figure following in famous footsteps. Three years ago, Bowman replaced Dale Earnhardt Jr. in the Hendrick No. 88; next season, he’ll take the reins of the No. 48 Chevrolet that Johnson carried to Hall of Fame heights in his illustrious career.“To watch his growth over the last few years, to drive after Dale Jr. in the 88 car and the pressure that comes with that, I feel like that was a big hurdle to accomplish when he first started, and he checked that box very well and moved on,” Johnson said. “Then the performance started to come, and the next thing is, can you elevate the consistency and have that there week-in and week-out. Then can you win and continue to win consistently, and he just keeps climbing the ladder with all those things in mind and handling all of this very, very well and delivering great results on a consistent level.”Though 2021’s early story lines will likely focus on whether Bowman can add to the stellar history of the No. 48, Johnson insists he’s eager to see Bowman forge his own identity with the team — much as he has the last three seasons.It’s just the latest form of encouragement from one driver to another, tracing back to a shared pre-race moment from 2014.“As we all know, it’ll be a story for a while and then he’s going to make that car his, and he’ll have an opportunity to write his own story,” Johnson says. “So, I’m excited for him, and I can’t wait to see what that story is.”MORE: Jimmie Johnson’s career in photoslast_img read more

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