IIROC offers discount on sanctions for quick settlements

first_img Share this article and your comments with peers on social media PwC alleges deleted emails, unusual transactions in Bridging Finance case Facebook LinkedIn Twitter James Langton BFI investors plead for firm’s sale Mouth mechanic turned market manipulator Keywords Enforcement,  Self-regulatory organizationsCompanies Investment Industry Regulatory Organization of Canada Effective immediately, targets of disciplinary actions from the Investment Industry Regulatory Organization of Canada (IIROC) can secure lighter punishments by settling cases quickly.The self-regulatory organization (SRO) has introduced a new initiative that would give both dealers and reps that are facing enforcement action the opportunity to secure a 30% discount on settlement sanctions in cases that are resolved more quickly. Related news gavel 123RF According to an IIROC notice, the reduction could apply to both monetary penalties and to the length of a suspension, but these sorts of settlements “will most often be applicable in cases in which only a fine is sought,” the SRO said.“While there are often valid reasons for the extensive negotiation of settlements, we believe there is an opportunity to achieve earlier resolutions in more cases, which leads to greater efficiency, more timely deterrence and effectively addresses investor harm,” said Charles Corlett, vice president, enforcement, at IIROC, in a release.“We want to encourage individuals to proactively cooperate and encourage firms to take remedial measures and address any investor harm through voluntary acts of compensation,” he added.At the same time, the SRO said that it has decided not to introduce a proposed program that would have sought to address relatively minor rule violations with standard penalties, and no public disclosure.IIROC decided to withdraw that proposal based on public feedback, including complaints that the practice of handing out anonymous discipline would not be in the public interest.There were also concerns about the clarity of the criteria under the proposed “minor contravention program”.For now, the SRO is withdrawing the proposed program, but it noted that it may make a new proposal in this area after considering possible alternative approaches.Both measures were developed by the SRO as part of an effort to expand its enforcement options, and to enhance its ability to efficiently deal with certain kinds of disciplinary cases.“Strengthening enforcement is one of IIROC’s strategic initiatives and plays a key role in our efforts to protect investors and support healthy Canadian capital markets,” said Corlett.last_img read more

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Accessibility in games is advancing — now marketing needs to catch up | Opinion

first_imgAccessibility in games is advancing — now marketing needs to catch up | OpinionThe growing interest in accessibility within game development isn’t reflected in the marketing of the very same productsBen BaylissWednesday 17th March 2021Share this article Recommend Tweet ShareThere has been a notable push over the last few years to improve accessibility in game development. From behemoth studios such as Naughty Dog to indie developers such as Special Magic Games, new accessibility features are being implemented and innovated upon — but there’s some catching up to be done when it comes to the marketing and PR for those very same products.Marketing takes many forms across different media — online trailers, adverts in magazines, even altering London underground signs to promote a new console launch. In the games industry, social media marketing has become the quickest way to deliver promotional assets and information, and some companies have started sharing information about accessibility features prior to a game’s launch, detailing what features will be available. Team17 published an accessibility-focused trailer for Overcooked! All You Can Eat, for example, and Naughty Dog presented an extensive blog post for The Last of Us Part 2. Nevertheless, some still do the bare minimum. CD Projekt Red only confirmed one accessibility feature for CyberPunk 2077 through a Twitter reply, and that was that players would simply be able to adjust subtitles. Destruction AllStars only had its accessibility features confirmed through a Twitter thread from the accessibility lead at PlayStation. Some studios don’t communicate anything at all.Scrolling through social media as a disabled user is always a gamble, and we’re usually dealt an inaccessible hand And even when this important information is distributed, the effort made to improve accessibility in development often isn’t carried over in communications. Scrolling through social media as a disabled user is always a gamble, and we’re usually dealt an inaccessible hand. Images with no alternative text applied, videos with no subtitles, lowercase hashtags, strings of emojis for no better reason than being artistic, and inconsistency across different accounts — all examples of inaccessible practices across social media.Not only does this create a bad experience, it also excludes a potential audience. Specifically for unreleased games, it can bring into question how accessible the game itself is likely to be, given the effort made through marketing prior to launch.It’s not just down to ensuring that information on relevant features is being shared; it’s about a commitment to accessibility in every part of a company. The scale of The Last of Us Part 2’s accessibility features is renowned across the industry — the most available in a game to date. Naughty Dog’s initiatives for blind and visually impaired players are adored by many who need them, but its social media posts don’t supply that same accessible experience.This is a common problem. After installing the Chrome plugin Alt or Not, I’ve been able to scroll through Twitter and see a plethora of images from official video game accounts and studios that have no alt text applied. While Naughty Dog tends to have captions for its YouTube videos, ensuring that content is accessible, its Twitter timeline is filled with uploaded images that do not have alternative text — a feature that helps make a blind or visually impaired user’s experience more accessible. Not having alt text applied means that audience is excluded from the information being presented. That introduced another issue I noticed — inconsistency. Ubisoft’s main account — run by Ubisoft North America — adds alt text to uploaded images. However, Ubisoft’s other regional branches and even it’s official game accounts do not. These efforts should apply across all accounts. Disabled audiences are being included in the game itself, but not the marketing that lets them know the game exists.On social media, being part of trending meme formats is a fantastic way to boost visibility and familiarity with an audience. But while an abundance of emojis or ASCII characters can be on trend, they also cause havoc on screen readers. These posts may look visually interesting, but for those using screen reader support, every single emoji or character will be read out loud. But there’s a way to avoid being inaccessible while also staying trendy. Xbox’s social media, for example, is known for jumping on the latest social trends, and that includes making use of emojis to create visual tweets. However, after facing criticism for making an inaccessible post, the company took the feedback on board. Instead of shying away from the same trends, Xbox adapted and changed its approach by using a screenshot of the structured emojis with alternative text applied.Disabled audiences are being included in the game itself, but not the marketing that lets them know the game exists Other areas of marketing need to be accessible as well, not just social media. Not taking the time to ensure assets are accessible, for example, means a chunk of your potential audience is left out of the excitement that others get to experience. Making a trailer, teaser, or even a dev diary? Make subtitles to go along with them. YouTube has a tool for creating subtitles, many editing programs are able to create subtitle files, and transcription programs can automatically turn audio into text to some degree. These methods can be used to provide closed captions — a subtitle file uploaded to a video platform — which usually allow the user to toggle and customise the presentation of the text.Perhaps the stylistic choice of creating readable open captions — subtitles that are burnt onto the source media — is more fitting for promotional material. While subtitles primarily serve a function and are not supposed to be pretty, creating open captions on videos can still be done with style providing they’re readable. Tag The Movie is a great example of achieving this on social media platforms. The animations aren’t too distracting, the text includes the actual dialogue, its presentation fits the campaign’s style, and it’s shareable.There’s also the option to ensure videos have audio description. Xbox and The Game Awards hosted audio described versions of their livestreams in 2020, for example. Ubisoft also gained access to a beta of a YouTube feature that allows additional audio tracks to be uploaded — it has used it to add audio description to improve the accessibility of its assets.Sharing information so close to release means that a disabled audience is only just finding out whether a game will be suitable for them Ensuring content is as accessible as possible can increase reach and allow marginalised audiences to feel a part of a game’s community. The tools are readily available, and there are numerous guides online on how to use them properly: Can I Play That has PR and marketing guidelines and a course; WebAIM has information on creating alternative text; and there’s a large list that explains and details problematic words, which was co-created by a number of marginalised people from different communities.It’s all well and good making a game itself more accessible, but games companies need to be more proactive with sharing this information. At the moment, too many studios don’t share what they’re working on regarding accessibility, resulting in players having to either purchase the game and hope they can play it comfortably, or wait and hope that a friend or specialist outlet shares their experiences. When studios do share details, it is usually very close to launch. While that’s not entirely an issue, sharing information so close to release means that a disabled audience is only just finding out whether a game will be suitable for them. Sharing commitments to accessibility early, on top of accessible marketing, will keep a disabled audience engaged. There may be NDAs in place that restrict this information from being shared, but it would be nice to see decision-makers allowing more accessibility information to go public earlier in the marketing cycleDisabled players may require specific features to be able to play comfortably, such as remapping, larger subtitles, colour blind settings, maybe even support for third-party devices such as eye-trackers, the Xbox Adaptive Controller, or even just a gamepad. Knowing this information is essential for some to make an informed purchase, and when accessibility efforts aren’t shared, that leaves disabled consumers at a loss.Related Jobs3D Artist – Mobile Studio – Midlands UK & Europe Big PlanetProducer Indie Game Studio France UK & Europe Big PlanetSenior C++ Unreal Programmer – PC and Console Studio – Austria South East Big PlanetDiscover more jobs in games And the process of sharing information with the community can provide feedback that can be used to make more improvements. HyperDot developer Tribe Games listened to its community and made positive changes, and Behaviour Interactive revised some of its decisions after sharing an updated HUD for Dead by Daylight. Despite this, in making a commitment to accessibility, it’s important to hire disabled accessibility consultants to share their stories and ideas. This could be by speaking with a specialist, or running marketing focus groups such as Xbox’s Design Sprints or Ubisoft’s Accessible Design Workshop.Accessibility needs to be a thought process that spans an entire company rather than just the development of a game. Marketing needs to engage a disabled audience in the same way it does a non-disabled audience, from updating development progress to ensuring assets are accessible. And that information should be allowed to be shared by those in charge, even if it’s only to acknowledge the studio has plans in place — a reassurance to disabled players that they should keep their attention on the game. Speaking and listening to disabled audiences is the only way to learn what they need, and the best way to ensure that accessibility features are present in every part of the process.As a Deaf hearing aid user, Ben is a freelance games journalist and accessibility advocate. He has a desire to spread awareness on disabilities and accessibility in video games.Celebrating employer excellence in the video games industry8th July 2021Submit your company Sign up for The Publishing & Retail newsletter and get the best of GamesIndustry.biz in your inbox. Enter your email addressMore storiesSpecialEffect joins Best Places To Work Awards as charity partnerUS event deadline is coming upBy Christopher Dring 21 hours agoResident Evil: Village is the third biggest PS5 launch so far | UK Boxed ChartsBut physical sales down over previous Resident Evil gamesBy Christopher Dring 23 hours agoLatest comments Sign in to contributeEmail addressPasswordSign in Need an account? Register now.last_img read more

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‘Museum of Innocence’

first_imgIt is 1975, and a young Istanbul businessman, prosperous and settled, walks into a boutique to buy his fiancée a purse. Behind the counter is a distant cousin – long ago a little girl and now gorgeous and inviting. “I felt my heart rise into my throat,” Kemal remembers, “with the force of an immense wave about to crash against the shore.”The scene is from “The Museum of Innocence,” a 2008 novel by Nobel laureate Orhan Pamuk that is just being published in English. Pamuk, a celebrant of his native Istanbul, is this year’s Charles Eliot Norton Professor of Poetry at HarvardWhat follows Kemal’s epiphany of love, said Pamuk during a panel this week (Oct. 14), is in some ways just a “melodrama” of the kind found widely in Turkish literature and cinema. “The boy meets the girl — something, something,” he summed up jokingly.But that “something, something” is more than love, tragedy, and death. It is also “a discourse on museums and collecting,” said Pamuk. He joined curatory and literary experts in “With the Museum in Mind,” a discussion at the Arthur M. Sackler Museum, in front of a packed house.In the novel, Kemal reacts to the death of Füsun, his beloved, by obsessively collecting objects that remind him of her and of their days of love: jewelry, silverware, ticket stubs, movie posters, a yellow jug.“Every time I touched the handle of that jug,” he muses, “I would remember those days when I first felt the misery that was to turn me in on myself.”In the course of the novel, Kemal decides to build a museum to his love. To gather ideas, he visits thousands of small, quirky museums, including places devoted to actresses Ava Gardner and Jane Mansfield. His travels take him to museums for medicine bottles, China tiles, hats, and more.Pamuk, who worked on the novel for six years, first conceived of using an annotated museum catalog as the narrative form, since in reading catalogs, he said, “we are actually reading a story, a novel.”The worlds of the novel and the museum are in some ways the same, said panel moderator Homi Bhabha, the Anne F. Rothenberg Professor of the Humanities and director of the Humanities Center at Harvard.  Both offer “a kind of joyous containment.”There is a kind of storytelling in museums, said Melissa Chiu, director of the Asia Society Museum in Manhattan, since curators give “voice to objects.” And there is a Kemal-like pilgrimage, too, among curators, she said, in their probing of objects, impressions, and ideas.A novel such as Pamuk’s lights up a constellation of ideas about museums, said Glenn Lowry, A.M. ’78, Ph.D.  ’82, director of the Museum of Modern Art in New York City. Like a novel, he said, “the space of a museum … is a fiction” meant to blur the line between the story of an object and its realityPamuk’s novel also reveals the act of collecting, said Lowry — even to the point of the pathological, “an irrepressible need to see surrounding objects and store them.”In his novel, Pamuk presents explicit notions about collectors. They are either proud or bashful, he told the audience at the Humanities Center, the panel’s sponsor. The proud revel in public display, a style that predominates in the West. The bashful shy away from display. They are driven by the same “dark compulsions” of collecting, but “these compulsions are an embarrassment,” said Pamuk. (He called bashful collecting an “un-modern view” still widely held in the East.)Panelist Helen Molesworth, the Maisie K. and James R. Houghton Curator of Contemporary Art at Harvard Art Museum, praised Pamuk’s novel as a “museum of nostalgia and desire … an anger of love … shot through with a kind of massive libidinal energy.” The objects that Kemal collects are understandable to a curator, she said, since they are an attempt “to create a harmony.”And like a novel, said Molesworth, a museum is a fusion of public and private spaces. It is both an object for sale and a place to go inside yourself.  She drew a parallel to French artist Marcel Duchamp (1887-1968), whose work influenced both Dadaists and Surrealists.Starting in 1935, as Europe was unraveling and headed for world war, Duchamp acted like Pamuk’s proud collector. He made small traveling suitcases that, like a novel, could be opened and enjoyed in any order: reproductions of his works (and new art) that expressed “his own desire to collect and preserve,” said Molesworth. (There are 268 of these public, portable museums.But from 1946 to 1966, Duchamp also made art in secret, collecting and creating objects bashfully in order to make, like Kemal, “his own monument of desire,” said Molesworth. “´Etant donnés,” his last major work, can only be viewed through two peepholes at the Philadelphia Museum of Art. It’s a monument to his four-year love affair with Brazilian sculptor Maria Martins.Pamuk’s creation and Duchamp’s both acknowledge the immobility of museums. For all his portable “museums” in handsome suitcases, Duchamp chose to create a last work that could never be moved. In the same way, “Kemal’s museum frees him to travel,” said Molesworth, “but be tethered to home” at the same time.Pamuk’s novels, in fact, celebrate a universality of human emotions, experiences, and desires. But they do so by being tethered to the realities of his native Istanbul. Kemal’s museum, the author says, not only celebrates a lost love, but the constancy and materiality of the city of his birth.Pamuk, in fact, is taking a radical step with “The Museum of Innocence.” He is building a museum of the same name in Istanbul, opening next year. (Each copy of the novel includes an entrance ticket.) The museum will be filled with real objects that evoke the work of fiction, including Turkish toothpaste, lottery tickets, maps, and postcards picturing the time of Kemal’s love affair three decades ago.In museums everywhere, “Viewers go to get out of the busy noise of the town,” Pamuk said, with a hint, too, of the refuge that a novel provides. “I like that feeling. My museum is about that.”last_img read more

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