Former sheriff’s deputy arrested in connection to Parkland school shooting

first_imgJoe Raedle/Getty Images(PARKLAND, Fla.) — A Broward County, Florida, sheriff’s deputy has been fired and arrested on felony charges in connection to the shooting at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland.Deputy Scot Peterson, 56, was arrested on seven counts of neglect of a child, three counts of culpable negligence and one count of perjury, according to a news release from the Florida Department of Law Enforcement.“The FDLE investigation shows former Deputy Peterson did absolutely nothing to mitigate the MSD shooting that killed 17 children, teachers and staff and injured 17 others,” said FDLE Commissioner Rick Swearingen in a statement. “There can be no excuse for his complete inaction and no question that his inaction cost lives.”As a result of an internal investigation, Broward County Sheriff Gregory Tony announced that Peterson and Sergeant Brian Miller were both terminated after they were found to have “neglected their duties at MSD High School,” the sheriff’s office said.This is a developing story. Please check back for updates.Copyright © 2019, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.last_img read more

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Chali 2na, Ghost-Note, More Join Nikkie Glaspie At “Peace, Love & Funk” Benefit Show [Photos]

first_imgLoad remaining images From Nelson Mandela and Desmond Tutu to the Boston Celtics and the world of software, the word “ubuntu” means different things to people all over the world. For those who gathered for the 11th annual Peace, Love & Funk fundraiser concert at The Mint in Los Angeles on the final Friday of January, the Nguni term was significant for more reasons than one.To start, there was a clear connection to Camp Ubuntu, the cause for which Nikki Glaspie, the powerhouse drummer-singer and leader of The Nth Power, and some of her most talented musician friends gathered to support. Proceeds from the evening—including ticket sales, an art auction and Nikki herself appealing to attendees for their largesse—went to the Harold Robinson Foundation, which partners with Camp Ubuntu to bring groups of marginalized students from South LA to the Angeles National Forest for three-day retreats at the Canyon Creek Complex.In spearheading the effort once again, Nikki also demonstrated the very definition of “ubuntu”—which translates to “I am because we are”—by packing a small space for a good cause.That includes the stage itself. While The Mint can comfortably accommodate a band in the 4-to-6-piece range, Nikki pushed the limits of what’s possible with as many as 17 musicians onstage at any given time. All told, more than 20 players cycled on and off through the set, including The Nth Power guitarist Nick Cassarino and bassist Nate Edgar, singer Amanda Brown, drummer Mike Mitchell, and a crowd of collaborators from Ghost-Note, among them Robert “Sput” Searight and Nate Werth on percussion, MonoNeon on bass, guitarist Peter Knudsen, Jonathan Mones on alto sax, Mike Jelani Brooks on tenor sax, Dominique “Xavier” Taplin on the keys, and Sylvester Onyekiaja (a.k.a. Sly5thAve) on baritone sax and the ones and twos before, during and between sets.Related: Denver Comes Alive Spotlight: Soulive & Ghost-Note Connect As Ghost-LiveNot to mention a kid from Japan named Oto Nori, who sat in with the rhythm section toward the end, and Jurassic 5’s Chali 2na, who hosted the event and lent his own baritone bars to a rendition of the O’Jays’ “Give the People What They Want”.For the better part of three hours, that collection of creators came together for two brilliant sets of music comprised of songs that spanned the spectrum of funk, jazz, soul, and R&B. From Aretha Franklin’s “Jump To It” and Diana Ross’ “Change of Heart”, to the Bar-Kays’ “Traffic Jammer” and Michael Jackson’s “PYT”, Nikki and company kept the full house dancing and grooving to a slew of classics.And that was just the first set. After an intermission that featured Nikki sharing stories about Camp Ubuntu and Nick serenading the room with his original song, “I Will Never Leave You”—written about his experience at Camp Ubuntu—the rest of the ensemble returned to the stage for another extended run on tracks like Chaka Khan’s “Do You Love What You Feel”, Prince’s “I Would Die 4 U”, and Mick Jagger’s “Let’s Work”.Through it all, this not-so-ragtag band took turns soloing, dueling and jamming. The vibes vacillated between those of a relatively impromptu group (which this was, to a great degree) and a family that had played together for ages.Such is the magic and majesty of music, especially when it’s performed by people as talented as those Nikki enlisted for this show. They were there because she was, and vice versa, as was the case for each reveler inside The Mint for Peace, Love & Funk. Thus, in creating a sonic community for a reason bigger than entertainment, everyone came to embody the spirit of “ubuntu,” with the hope of passing it on to the next generation.Below, check out a gallery of photos courtesy of photographer Josh Martin.Fans looking to catch Nikki Glaspie perform in a collaboration setting akin to Peace, Love & Funk should head to Denver Comes Alive at Mission Ballroom in Denver, CO on January 31st. Glaspie will perform as part of the Poppa Funk & The Night Tripper: A Tribute To Art Neville & Dr. John set with Ivan Neville, Jon Cleary, George Porter Jr., Ian Neville, Tony Hall, Kerik, and Big Sam. Tickets are available here.Peace, Love & Funk | The Mint | Los Angeles, CA | 1/24/20 | Photos: Josh Martinlast_img read more

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6-Year-Old Girls Already Have Gendered Beliefs About Intelligence

first_imgThe Atlantic:“There are lots of people at the place where I work, but there is one person who is really special. This person is really, really smart,” said Lin Bian. “This person figures out how to do things quickly and comes up with answers much faster and better than anyone else. This person is really, really smart.”Bian, a psychologist at the University of Illinois, read this story out to 240 children, aged 5 to 7. She then showed them pictures of four adults—two men and two women—and asked them to guess which was the protagonist of the story. She also gave them two further tests: one in which they had to guess which adult in a pair was “really, really smart”, and another where they had to match attributes like “smart” or “nice” to pictures of unfamiliar men and women.…“It’s an excellent, important, and well-designed paper,” says Alison Gopnik from the University of California, Berkeley, who studies the minds of babies and children. “The pattern it reports is very consistent with other studies which show the emergence of gender stereotypes at around age 6.”Read the whole story: The Atlantic More of our Members in the Media >last_img read more

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RF Channel Emulator Enables Advanced MIMO OTA Testing

first_imgAnite has announced that its industry leading Propsim F32 Channel Emulator supports advanced MIMO OTA mobile device testing using a Multi Probe Anechoic Chamber (MPAC) methodology as recommended by 3GPP (3rd Generation Partnership Project is a collaboration between groups of telecommunications associations). This innovative test environment enables users to verify that mobile devices with the latest technology features, including multiple antenna configurations and carrier aggregation, perform as expected.Anite has been an integral part of 3GPP since the start of the study on test methodologies for advanced MIMO OTA testing. All major test system integrators have benefited from using Anite’s Propsim F32 Channel Emulator to provide results to the standards community. In September last year, Anite also announced that it had helped to accelerate the initial release of the CTIA standardised MIMO OTA performance test plan.The Propsim F32 is a single unit channel emulator that supports eight dual polarized antennas for MIMO OTA testing in an anechoic chamber. It can be expanded to support 16 dual polarized antennas (required for testing larger devices), making it a future-proof solution for upcoming technologies and device formats.last_img read more

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