Ambulance company gives free EMT classes

first_img“There’s an expectancy of growth (in the need for EMTs and paramedics) over the next 10 years of 27 percent,” Ratliff said, and there’s already a shortage. By helping to train EMTs, Superior hopes that “We can recruit right from our classes.” Sandra Ratliff, of the human resources department at Superior, said it’s not an entirely altruistic offer. Superior Ambulance in Roseville is offering free training to become an emergency medical technician to people who meet the requirements and pass a pre-employment interview.last_img read more

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Watch Nathaniel Rateliff And Jon Batiste Collaborate On ‘Colbert’ [Videos]

first_imgBack in February, singer-songwriter Nathaniel Rateliff teamed up with The Late Show with Stephen Colbert musical director Jon Batiste for a cover of the Sam & Dave hit “Hold On, I’m Coming”. Video of their collaboration was shared on Wednesday night’s broadcast of the late-night show, along with their rendition of “All Or Nothing” from Rateliff’s 2020 debut solo album And It’s Still Alright.The video of the pair’s take on the 1960’s R&B hit finds the two performing in close quarters, both maskless, as audiences fondly remember what life was like six months ago. Batiste tackles the infectiously upbeat rhythm on a grand piano while Rateliff contributes his own understated vocals while playing his acoustic guitar. While Rateliff’s soft-spoken singing style may be one of the hallmarks of his repertoire, even he can’t resist belting out the classic tune as he and Batiste team up for the chorus.Related: Nathaniel Rateliff Provides Unique Perspective In New “Time Stands” Music Video [Watch]In the bonus clip, shared online rather than during the live broadcast, a bit of between-song banter fosters the idea that this meeting was some kind of impromptu jam session, rather than a carefully choreographed media event. Yet there is a bit of levity in the scripted dialogue as Rateliff admits that even he turns to YouTube sometimes to try and learn songs. Even YouTube couldn’t teach Rateliff whatever obscure Eddie Arnold song he was trying to learn, however, so he just wrote “All Or Nothing” instead.Watch Nathaniel Rateliff and Jon Batiste’s collaboration on “Hold On, I’m Coming” and “All Or Nothing” below.Jon Batiste & Nathaniel Rateliff – “Hold On, I’m Coming” (Sam & Dave)[Video: The Late Show with Stephen Colbert]Jon Batiste & Nathaniel Rateliff – “All Or Nothing”[Video: The Late Show with Stephen Colbert]last_img read more

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Student survives cancer, gives back

first_imgDuring the fall semester of her freshman year, doctors diagnosed junior Courtney Rauch with breast cancer. Two years and numerous surgeries later, Rauch is now cancer-free and is actively involved in breast cancer research on campus. “[Breast cancer has] kind of given me the mentality that you don’t wait for things,” Rauch said. “I try to make the most out of everything that I do here. Coming in, I knew I only have four years here and I have to make the most of college, but the fact that I had to miss school and, occasionally, I thought I would have to stay home an entire semester … I dedicate myself to everything I do as much as I can.” Rauch said her family and friends supported her throughout the past two years as her cancer returned over and over again. She stayed in school, but traveled home multiple times for doctors’ visits and surgeries. “I have tremendous thanks for all of my friends, because freshman year — that’s a lot to handle,” Rauch said. “My friends did such a great job of keeping me positive.” As an applied mathematics major and a breast cancer patient, Rauch said she was immediately drawn to a research opportunity with Department of Applied Mathematics chair Steven Buechler. “He’s doing research where he’s not really finding a cure for cancer, but he’s finding out ways to group breast cancer patients so you know which treatment … they would respond to,” Rauch said. “The way it is now, a lot of people get chemo when they don’t actually need chemo. The chemo isn’t necessarily the best treatment to help them.” Her experience with cancer helped Rauch dedicate herself to Buechler’s project. “His research won’t necessarily affect me, but it is going to help other people who were in my position,” Rauch said. “Knowing how that felt — literally I was sitting there, and they were saying I could choose what I wanted my treatment to be. I was like, ‘I’m 19 years old, and I don’t know anything about this.’ Having that experience helps me understand what other women are going to feel.” In his research, Buechler is developing an affordable test to determine the chance of relapse for breast cancer patients through genetic data. The test will allow oncologists and patients to make more educated decisions about cancer treatment. “[The test offers] added information for the patient and the oncologist about what is really going on in that specific disease so you can plan a treatment that makes sense,” Buechler said. “[Courtney is] helping to understand when oncologists decide to give a certain type of drug or not … Identifying the right drug for them, that might be a lifesaver.” Buechler became interested in applying math to disease five years ago. Breast cancer was a natural choice for his project focus because so much information was available on the disease, he said, and he began to compile genetic data from the National Institute of Health for his project. “My test identifies four genes that, if they are turned on at a high level, the patient has a poor prognosis,” Buechler said. Once marketed commercially and applied to real patients, the test would allow labs to compare a genetic sample to past samples and predict how the cancer will act in the future. In order to understand the more technical biology behind breast cancer, Buechler consulted oncologist Dr. Rudolph Navari, the director of the Harper Cancer Research Institute. The Institute is a partnership between the Indiana University School of Medicine and Notre Dame. “Right now we have about six people on campus, both at Notre Dame and the School of Medicine, who are doing basic science work in cancer and breast cancer,” Navari said. “They are working anywhere from developing drugs, to learning how breast cancer grows, to learning how breast cancer spreads.” Genetic tests like Buechler’s could be a key to future clinical treatments for cancer, Navari said. “One of the things that is also important is that if we use a genetic approach to these various cancers and find out which genes are important, then we may be able to alter these genes to prevent breast cancer,” he said. “Breast cancer is still the main disease that is predominantly, if not 100 percent, gene-based.” Buechler said one in eight women will develop breast cancer during her lifetime, and more research means more steps toward a cure. “I think it is extremely promising,” Buechler said. “There are a lot of advances that have been made and are being made. Every dime that has been spent has been well spent … It’s also a story of what advocacy can do. [October] is Breast Cancer Awareness Month, and we’ve heard a lot about it. All of that effort and attention and money and advocacy pays off.” For Rauch, advocating for breast cancer awareness and research will continue to be important. “I think one of the biggest things that I have learned is how much [cancer] affects everyone around me … knowing that it’s not just one person or their close friends,” she said. “It’s everyone that interacts with them on a daily basis … [Cancer research like Buechler’s] is a job I would love to do, to use my degree and help other people.”last_img read more

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Shapiro petitions for Bar reinstatement

first_img Shapiro petitions for Bar reinstatement Pursuant to Rule 3-7.10, James J. Shapiro of Boca Raton has petitioned the Supreme Court of Florida for Bar reinstatement.In an order dated October 17, 2005, the court suspended Shapiro for one year nunc pro tunc to May 6, 2005. The suspension was entered as reciprocal discipline to a one year suspension entered by the New York Bar for improper solicitation of clients and advertising violations.Any persons having knowledge bearing upon Shapiro’s fitness or qualifications to resume the practice of law should contact Cheryl L. Soler, legal assistant for The Florida Bar, at (954) 772-2245. Shapiro petitions for Bar reinstatement June 1, 2007 Regular Newslast_img read more

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Mr. Orange and Blue

first_imgMr. Orange and Blue Mark D. Killian Managing EditorIf you have been to the Swamp to watch the University of Florida Gators play football over the past 26 seasons, you’ve seen Richard Johnston, a bankruptcy attorney from Ft. Myers. But it is not his well-mannered, professional, board-certified legal skills that are on display. No, on football Saturdays, Johnston morphs into the madcap “Mr. Orange and Blue,” leading the Gator faithful in cheers and working the crowd into a frenzy — all while running around the field wearing his trademark Crocs clogs, one orange and one blue.“It is one of the biggest rushes I could ever imagine,” said Johnston, a Fowler White Boggs lawyer who described his role as a ringmaster who gets to “flip the switch” on 90,000 people. “I’m with all the cheerleaders; I have a 300-piece band behind me spelling the letters out. It is overwhelming to be able to rev them up. I know what I do is not the centerpiece, but it is an element of the electricity of Gator football.”He sees it as his job to build excitement to a peak and help make Ben Hill Griffin Stadium a tough place for opponents to play football.“I’m just a fan who escaped onto the field with a microphone,” Johnston said. “I don’t have any special training.”But he does have a history with UF, earning his undergraduate and law degrees from Florida and serving as a cheerleader in 1978 and 1980 — his senior year as an undergrad and his second year of law school, respectively. It was during his second stint as a rah-rah that he got on the microphone.“It was a good year to do it because we had just come off of 0-10-1, the first year of the Charlie Pell era. You could say ‘boo’ and they would scream,” Johnston said. “It was a good year. We were winning. It is always easier to be a cheerleader when you are winning.”He must have made a good impression. Three years later, when Johnston was toiling as a young lawyer at the venerable Ervin firm in Tallahassee, the Gators came calling.“I’m like, there is no way this conservative Tallahassee firm that is half full of Seminoles and half full of Gators is ever going to let me do this,” Johnston said.But the then-26-year-old summoned up the intestinal fortitude to approach senior partner Bob Ervin, a former Florida Bar president, about reprising his energetic role.“I said, ‘Bob, the university wants me to come in and get things revved up before the games on the football field. What do you think?’” Johnston said. “I’m wincing, waiting for the ‘no.’“And he says, ‘Why Richard, I think it is a marvelous idea. Do mention the firm’s name and telephone number while you are on the field,’” said Johnston, imitating Ervin’s gentlemanly Southern drawl.Now 51, Johnston still brings high energy to his game day cheers.“Anybody can announce,” he said. “I hope what I bring to the table is something that is a little more exciting and adds to the color and excitement of college football.”His job also entails making on-field introductions of those who have done great things for the university, including donors, those who have excelled in academics, and other athletes.“It is the epicenter of the Gator Nation, a moment when all the University of Florida’s fans’ eyes are focused on the field,” Johnston said. “And I want to make that moment for those people very special.”Johnston has not missed a home game in 26 years. Some of his greatest memories include the Gators’ 14-9 victory over Florida State in 1991; both teams were ranked in the top five that year. The Gators had just clinched their first SEC championship, and it took a late defensive stand in the fourth quarter to preserve the victory.“That may have been one of the most intense dogfights of a game I ever remember seeing,” he said.Another was in November 2006 against the Steve Spurrier-led University of South Carolina squad. With seconds to go, the Gamecocks lined up for a possibly game-winning 48-yard field goal that, if successful, would have likely ended any hope of the Gators’ national championship quest. But Florida’s 6-foot-6 defensive end Jarvis Moss blocked the kick, preserving a 17-16 victory.“It went from being so quiet — like a church — to just bedlam,” Johnston recalled.Florida went on to defeat Ohio State in the BCS National Championship game.He even got a national championship ring on the occasion of his 25th year on the sidelines.“It’s as big as a Volkswagen,” he said.Johnston is married to a Seminole fan who says her husband has the oddest hobby on Earth.“That is true,” admits Johnston, who jokingly adds he will keep working Gator games “until they pry the microphone out of my cold, dead hands.” October 15, 2009 Managing Editor Regular News ‘I’m just a fan who escaped onto the field with a microphone’ Mr. Orange and Bluelast_img read more

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Robinson’s camps teach youths ‘life skills’

first_img“It’s about as intense as you can get,” he said. “I mean you can’t put these kids through much more than we already do put them through.”But that’s what Robinson said makes the difference between his camps and others being offered.“Most sports camps are skill development,” he said. “(My training) has more to do with (work ethic) than just the technical part of it.”Robinson said the work ethic is something that goes a long way into giving youths a life skill.Larrieu said he hopes those skills will transfer into better results on the mat this coming year and possibly in the future at Minnesota.“This is a really big college that I look forward to hopefully coming to one year,” Larrieu said of the Minnesota wrestling program.Larrieu would break the streak of J Robinson campers coming to Minnesota. No current Gophers wrestler has been to Robinson’s camp before coming to school at Minnesota.But first, Larrieu has to complete his junior and senior year of high school.“These are high school kids that want to be good,” Robinson said. “They don’t know how to be good, and what we do is we teach them work ethic on how they can be successful.” Robinson’s camps teach youths ‘life skills’J Robinson’s intensive camps are one of six types of wrestling camps offered. Robert MewsJuly 19, 2006Jump to CommentsShare on FacebookShare on TwitterShare via EmailPrintDespite temperatures soaring past 90 degrees the past few days, a herd of runners still took to University streets with athletic improvement on their minds.These runners weren’t just any collection of athletes, but 14- to 18-year-olds who paid $2,149 to give up 28 days of summer fun for a life-altering experience at J Robinson’s intensive wrestling camp.“Last year I had a disappointing season (wrestling),” said Trenton Larrieu, a Spring Valley, Wis., high school wrestler, of his decision to come to the camp. “I figured this is the way to get better.”That is just what J Robinson, Minnesota’s wrestling coach for the past 20 years, had in mind when he started the camps for youths 28 years ago.Robinson has a variety of nationwide camps to choose from. Along with six types of wrestling camps, Robinson also has basketball and hockey camps.“I think you start them just like any other coach,” Robinson said. “You just start them as part of your program. Try and help the younger wrestlers get better.”But Robinson’s intensive camp isn’t like other camps.The 28-day camp is the longest of all of his camps, with a typical day starting at 6:30 a.m. and ending at 11 p.m. It includes plenty of running and weight lifting as well as unorthodox training techniques to help develop what Robinson calls “life skills.”“It’s hard. The intensity really picks up as the camp goes,” Larrieu said.Current Gophers wrestler Mack Reiter helps the youngsters train and said some can’t make it through because of the duration and intensity of training.last_img read more

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Impossible Knowledge: Are You an Expert?

first_imgThe Huffington Post:I grew up with a habitual overclaimer. He wildly exaggerated his expertise, at times claiming knowledge of things he couldn’t possibly know — people, events, ideas that simply do not exist. Being unfamiliar with overclaiming, I just called him a liar.I couldn’t have known the word “overclaimer,” nor the concept. The word didn’t exist and is only used today in the world of psychological science. Even so, we’re all familiar with these people who feel the need to overestimate what they know about the world. What underlies such assertions of impossible knowledge?Read the whole story: The Huffington PostWray Herbert is an author and award-winning journalist who writes two popular blogs for APS, We’re Only Human and Full Frontal Psychology. Follow Wray on Twitter @wrayherbert. More of our Members in the Media >last_img read more

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Probe finds central-line infections still problematic in US hospitals

first_imgEarlier this year, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) released data showing that US hospitals had met national targets by reducing central-line bloodstream infections by 50% between 2008 and 2014. The drop in these infections, which make up roughly 5% of all healthcare-associated infections (HAIs), was hailed as a success story.But according to a new investigation from Consumer Reports, central-line infections remain a substantial problem for many US hospitals.While the investigation does not dispute the CDC data, it indicates that progress across the country has not been even. Using data from the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS), Consumer Reports investigated nearly 2,000 US teaching hospitals to see which ones have successfully reduced central-line infections, and which haven’t. Thirty-two hospitals made the top performer list, while 31 were identified on the magazine’s “lowest-performer” list.Among the top performing hospitals is Mount Auburn Hospital in Cambridge, Mass., which from 2014 to 2015 reported only 1 infection in intensive care unit (ICU) patients with central lines. Among the lowest performers is UF Health Jacksonville in Jacksonville, Fla., which reported more than 100 central-line infections in ICU patients from 2014 to 2015.The report also showed substantial differences between states, with more than 75% of teaching hospitals in Minnesota and Wisconsin meeting the national target for central-line infections, while only a third of hospitals in Louisiana met the target.“Because teaching hospitals are teaching our next generation of physicians, we think it’s critical to monitor them closely,” Doris Peter, PhD, director of the Consumer Reports Health Ratings Center, said in a Consumer Report news release. “Our review of their performance on controlling central-line infections is very sobering.”Central-line infections struck more than 27,000 people in 2015, according to Consumer Reports, are fatal in up to a quarter of cases, and cost $46,000 to treat on average.Central-line infections and resistanceA central venous catheter, also known as a central line, is a tube that providers place in a large vein in the neck, chest, groin or arm to quickly give fluid, blood, or medication to a patient. They are important in treating conditions in a variety of healthcare settings, but are often used in ICU patients and can remain in place for weeks or months.But when central lines aren’t inserted correctly, or aren’t adequately cleaned, they provide an access point for bacteria to enter the bloodstream and spread to the heart and other organs. When the bacteria are drug-resistant, deadly infections can ensue.According to the CDC, one in six central-line infections can be caused by antibiotic-resistant bacteria the agency considers a serious or urgent threat, such as methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) or carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae (CRE). When these infections occur, physicians have limited options for treatment.”Many hospital-acquired infections are going to be of a drug-resistant variety,” Amesh Adalja, MD, an infectious disease and emergency medicine specialist at the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center and member of the Infectious Disease Society of America, told CIDRAP News. “Organisms like MRSA, for example, represent a high burden of central-line infections.”As a result, cutting down on central-line infections is a critical element in the CDC’s efforts to combat antibiotic resistance.”To get a handle on multidrug-resistant infections, you have to drill down and see which infections they are causing, and central-line infections are one major component of that burden,” Adalja says. “So by minimizing central-line infections, you will have some effect on drug-resistant infections in general.”Furthermore, cutting down on central-line infections will aid antibiotic stewardship by decreasing the use of antibiotics like vancomycin, which is commonly used to treat MRSA infections. “It will reduce the need for these antibiotics if you have less of these infections,” Adalja says.Safety protocols play a critical roleThe effort to reduce central-line infections and other types of HAIs in US hospitals stems back to 2008, when the Department of Health and Human Services determined that eliminating HAIs was a top safety priority. The Affordable Care Act, with its provisions that lower Medicare payments for hospitals with high infection rates, has also fostered improvements.Hospitals across the country have had far more success in reducing central-line infections than they’ve had with other types of HAIs. According to the Consumer Reports investigation, that’s due in part to following a set of protocols developed 15 years ago by Peter Pronovost, MD, who currently serves as senior vice president for patient safety and quality at Johns Hopkins Medicine in Baltimore, MD.Pronovost’s checklist contains five basic steps that physicians should follow when placing a central-line catheter. The steps include washing hands; cleaning a patient’s skin with chlorhexidine; wearing a mask, hat, gown, and gloves and putting sterile drapes over the patient; avoiding placement of the catheter near the groin, where infection rates are higher; and removing the catheter as soon as possible.While central-line infections are always going to be a risk, Adalja believes they can be reduced even more by minimizing the use of central lines, using different types of intravenous devices, or employing new innovations, like antibiotic-impregnated central catheters. “There are a whole bunch of things that can be used to try and get the rate even lower,” he said.See also:Nov 21 Consumer Reports investigationNov 21 Consumer Reports news releaseMarch 2016 CDC HAI progress reportlast_img read more

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On The Job In Los Alamos: Warner Waving At Motorists

first_imgOn the job in Los Alamos is Larry Warner, 87, spotted Tuesday morning on his ‘geriatric jog’ as he likes to refer to his daily two mile walk on North Mesa. A reader contacted the Los Alamos Daily Post about Warner and expressed gratitude for the fact that he smiles and waves at every car that passes by him during his walks. Photo by Jennifer Bartram/ladailypost.comlast_img

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People Moves: Capita Real Estate, Goodwin, Lodders and more

first_imgWould you like to read more?Register for free to finish this article.Sign up now for the following benefits:Four FREE articles of your choice per monthBreaking news, comment and analysis from industry experts as it happensChoose from our portfolio of email newsletters To access this article REGISTER NOWWould you like print copies, app and digital replica access too? SUBSCRIBE for as little as £5 per week.last_img

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