Kushner Cos. buys Gary Barnett out of development on NJ waterfront

first_imgExtell Development president Gary Barnett and Kushner Companies founder Charles Kushner with a rendering The Lofts at Pier Village in New Jersey (Rendering via Extell Development)Gary Barnett’s Extell Development is saying goodbye to the New Jersey waterfront — at least part of it.The developer, known for his luxury high-rise condo towers in Manhattan, has sold his company’s 50 percent stake in two completed phases of New Jersey’s Pier Village to Kushner Companies, according to sources familiar with the transaction. The deal, which gives Kushner full ownership, valued the project’s rentals, retail and hotel at $181 million, the source said.Read moreKushner’s home-field advantageExtell tops out at its Pier Village condo complex in Long BranchKushner Companies to debut Long Branch resort next month Extell and Kushner Companies teamed up in 2014 to buy Pier Village along with a then-vacant stretch of land from Ironstate Development for $200 million. At the time, Pier Village had 492 rentals and 90,000 square feet of retail, which Ironstate developed in two phases during the aughts through an urban renewal deal with the city of Long Branch.Extell and Kushner sought to transform the beachside development from a seasonal destination into a place that would attract year-round residents. In 2017, the duo won approval from the local City Council for a $283 million addition to Pier Village. Kushner developed the 67-key Wave Resort hotel and Extell built Lofts Pier Village, a 245-unit condominium across three buildings as part of the development’s third and final phase.Thanks to the recent deal, Kushner now owns the approximately 40,000 square feet of retail in the base of the condo, the Wave Resort hotel and the remainder of the Pier Village rental apartments and retail. Extell will retain ownership of the boardwalk carousel at 160 Ocean Avenue, along with the 245-unit condo, where 25 percent of units remain unsold.Extell netted proceeds of around $25 million, after accounting for the debt, which was expected to be used to pay down debt in the Israeli bond market. Barnett could not be reached.The developers have worked together before, in 2014 selling the 235,000-square-foot building at 80 West End Avenue for $195 million to Frank Ring.Laurent Morali, president of Kushner Companies, declined to discuss any of the financial details of the Pier Village sale, but said the company was “very happy to own 100 percent” of the Jersey Shore property.For Kushner Companies, the deal is in line with its expansion in its home state of New Jersey. In January, the company picked up a 1,000-unit apartment portfolio in New Jersey and New York for $266.5 million. It’s also recently made big bets in Maryland, Virginia and South Florida. This content is for subscribers only.Subscribe Nowlast_img read more

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Matija Gubica and Boris Milosevic NBSC World Handball Referee 2019

first_imgWho is NBSC World Handball Referees 2019? Martin Gjeding / Mads Hansen (Denmark) (35%, 2,050 Votes)  10 Gubica – Milosevic join “crowns” – Nordic final with Croatian referees ShareTweetShareShareEmail Related Items:Boris Milosevic and Matija Gubica, World Handball Referee 2019 ShareTweetShareShareEmailCommentsThe Croatian referee’s pair, Matija Gubica and Boris Milosevic, is the best in the world of handball in 2019! For the fourth year in a row Handball-Planet.com organized the Contest for the WORLD HANDBALL REFEREE 2019 powered by New Belgrade Summer Cup, based on opinion of handball journalists from all over the world and handball fans (around 6.000 votes), who voted in the last two weeks and added their votes to existing number of points given by the expert’s jury.Croatian pair has whistled on a high level the last two big final at Men’s EHF EURO 2018 in Zagreb and IHF World Championship 2019 in Herning.VOTES (journalist + fans)Boris Milosevic / Matija Gubica (Croatia) 33 + 4 – 37Lars Geipel / Markus Helbig (Germany) 27 + 7 – 34Martin Gjeding / Mads Hansen (Denmark) 18 + 10 – 28Gjorgji Nacevski and Slave Nikolov (Macedonia) 11 + 15 – 26Oscar Raluy Lopez, Angel Sabroso Ramirez 5 + 1 – 6 Lars Geipel / Markus Helbig (Germany) (20%, 1,172 Votes)   7 Total Voters: 5,868 PREVIOUS WINNERS2016 – Gjorgji Nacevski and Slave Nikolov (Macedonia)2017 – Martin Gjeding / Mads Hansen (Denmark) 2018 – Oscar Raluy Lopez / Angel Sabroso Ramirez (Spain) Recommended for you Boris Milosevic / Matija Gubica (Croatia) (9%, 510 Votes)      4 Gjorgji Nacevski and Slave Nikolov (North Macedonia) (35%, 2,068 Votes)  15 Leave a Reply Cancel replyYour email address will not be published.Comment Name Email Website Save my name, email, and website in this browser for the next time I comment. Oscar Raluy Lopez, Angel Sabroso Ramirez (Spain) (1%, 68 Votes)        1 Click to commentlast_img read more

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TfL to examine London DRT as Chariot criticised

first_imgSouth London residents claim that Chariot is contributing to congestionTransport for London (TfL) has announced that it is to explore the potential of demand responsive transport (DRT) to grow public transport use – despite the Chariot concept having already been strongly criticised by residents of areas that it serves.TfL has approached bus operators and technology companies. Its DRT trial is set to use minibuses in a part of outer London, supplementing the existing bus network.Meanwhile, residents in South London claim that the Chariot network has not been properly thought through and that it is contributing to congestion.last_img read more

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Ambulance company gives free EMT classes

first_img“There’s an expectancy of growth (in the need for EMTs and paramedics) over the next 10 years of 27 percent,” Ratliff said, and there’s already a shortage. By helping to train EMTs, Superior hopes that “We can recruit right from our classes.” Sandra Ratliff, of the human resources department at Superior, said it’s not an entirely altruistic offer. Superior Ambulance in Roseville is offering free training to become an emergency medical technician to people who meet the requirements and pass a pre-employment interview.last_img read more

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Watch Nathaniel Rateliff And Jon Batiste Collaborate On ‘Colbert’ [Videos]

first_imgBack in February, singer-songwriter Nathaniel Rateliff teamed up with The Late Show with Stephen Colbert musical director Jon Batiste for a cover of the Sam & Dave hit “Hold On, I’m Coming”. Video of their collaboration was shared on Wednesday night’s broadcast of the late-night show, along with their rendition of “All Or Nothing” from Rateliff’s 2020 debut solo album And It’s Still Alright.The video of the pair’s take on the 1960’s R&B hit finds the two performing in close quarters, both maskless, as audiences fondly remember what life was like six months ago. Batiste tackles the infectiously upbeat rhythm on a grand piano while Rateliff contributes his own understated vocals while playing his acoustic guitar. While Rateliff’s soft-spoken singing style may be one of the hallmarks of his repertoire, even he can’t resist belting out the classic tune as he and Batiste team up for the chorus.Related: Nathaniel Rateliff Provides Unique Perspective In New “Time Stands” Music Video [Watch]In the bonus clip, shared online rather than during the live broadcast, a bit of between-song banter fosters the idea that this meeting was some kind of impromptu jam session, rather than a carefully choreographed media event. Yet there is a bit of levity in the scripted dialogue as Rateliff admits that even he turns to YouTube sometimes to try and learn songs. Even YouTube couldn’t teach Rateliff whatever obscure Eddie Arnold song he was trying to learn, however, so he just wrote “All Or Nothing” instead.Watch Nathaniel Rateliff and Jon Batiste’s collaboration on “Hold On, I’m Coming” and “All Or Nothing” below.Jon Batiste & Nathaniel Rateliff – “Hold On, I’m Coming” (Sam & Dave)[Video: The Late Show with Stephen Colbert]Jon Batiste & Nathaniel Rateliff – “All Or Nothing”[Video: The Late Show with Stephen Colbert]last_img read more

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Student survives cancer, gives back

first_imgDuring the fall semester of her freshman year, doctors diagnosed junior Courtney Rauch with breast cancer. Two years and numerous surgeries later, Rauch is now cancer-free and is actively involved in breast cancer research on campus. “[Breast cancer has] kind of given me the mentality that you don’t wait for things,” Rauch said. “I try to make the most out of everything that I do here. Coming in, I knew I only have four years here and I have to make the most of college, but the fact that I had to miss school and, occasionally, I thought I would have to stay home an entire semester … I dedicate myself to everything I do as much as I can.” Rauch said her family and friends supported her throughout the past two years as her cancer returned over and over again. She stayed in school, but traveled home multiple times for doctors’ visits and surgeries. “I have tremendous thanks for all of my friends, because freshman year — that’s a lot to handle,” Rauch said. “My friends did such a great job of keeping me positive.” As an applied mathematics major and a breast cancer patient, Rauch said she was immediately drawn to a research opportunity with Department of Applied Mathematics chair Steven Buechler. “He’s doing research where he’s not really finding a cure for cancer, but he’s finding out ways to group breast cancer patients so you know which treatment … they would respond to,” Rauch said. “The way it is now, a lot of people get chemo when they don’t actually need chemo. The chemo isn’t necessarily the best treatment to help them.” Her experience with cancer helped Rauch dedicate herself to Buechler’s project. “His research won’t necessarily affect me, but it is going to help other people who were in my position,” Rauch said. “Knowing how that felt — literally I was sitting there, and they were saying I could choose what I wanted my treatment to be. I was like, ‘I’m 19 years old, and I don’t know anything about this.’ Having that experience helps me understand what other women are going to feel.” In his research, Buechler is developing an affordable test to determine the chance of relapse for breast cancer patients through genetic data. The test will allow oncologists and patients to make more educated decisions about cancer treatment. “[The test offers] added information for the patient and the oncologist about what is really going on in that specific disease so you can plan a treatment that makes sense,” Buechler said. “[Courtney is] helping to understand when oncologists decide to give a certain type of drug or not … Identifying the right drug for them, that might be a lifesaver.” Buechler became interested in applying math to disease five years ago. Breast cancer was a natural choice for his project focus because so much information was available on the disease, he said, and he began to compile genetic data from the National Institute of Health for his project. “My test identifies four genes that, if they are turned on at a high level, the patient has a poor prognosis,” Buechler said. Once marketed commercially and applied to real patients, the test would allow labs to compare a genetic sample to past samples and predict how the cancer will act in the future. In order to understand the more technical biology behind breast cancer, Buechler consulted oncologist Dr. Rudolph Navari, the director of the Harper Cancer Research Institute. The Institute is a partnership between the Indiana University School of Medicine and Notre Dame. “Right now we have about six people on campus, both at Notre Dame and the School of Medicine, who are doing basic science work in cancer and breast cancer,” Navari said. “They are working anywhere from developing drugs, to learning how breast cancer grows, to learning how breast cancer spreads.” Genetic tests like Buechler’s could be a key to future clinical treatments for cancer, Navari said. “One of the things that is also important is that if we use a genetic approach to these various cancers and find out which genes are important, then we may be able to alter these genes to prevent breast cancer,” he said. “Breast cancer is still the main disease that is predominantly, if not 100 percent, gene-based.” Buechler said one in eight women will develop breast cancer during her lifetime, and more research means more steps toward a cure. “I think it is extremely promising,” Buechler said. “There are a lot of advances that have been made and are being made. Every dime that has been spent has been well spent … It’s also a story of what advocacy can do. [October] is Breast Cancer Awareness Month, and we’ve heard a lot about it. All of that effort and attention and money and advocacy pays off.” For Rauch, advocating for breast cancer awareness and research will continue to be important. “I think one of the biggest things that I have learned is how much [cancer] affects everyone around me … knowing that it’s not just one person or their close friends,” she said. “It’s everyone that interacts with them on a daily basis … [Cancer research like Buechler’s] is a job I would love to do, to use my degree and help other people.”last_img read more

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Shapiro petitions for Bar reinstatement

first_img Shapiro petitions for Bar reinstatement Pursuant to Rule 3-7.10, James J. Shapiro of Boca Raton has petitioned the Supreme Court of Florida for Bar reinstatement.In an order dated October 17, 2005, the court suspended Shapiro for one year nunc pro tunc to May 6, 2005. The suspension was entered as reciprocal discipline to a one year suspension entered by the New York Bar for improper solicitation of clients and advertising violations.Any persons having knowledge bearing upon Shapiro’s fitness or qualifications to resume the practice of law should contact Cheryl L. Soler, legal assistant for The Florida Bar, at (954) 772-2245. Shapiro petitions for Bar reinstatement June 1, 2007 Regular Newslast_img read more

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Mr. Orange and Blue

first_imgMr. Orange and Blue Mark D. Killian Managing EditorIf you have been to the Swamp to watch the University of Florida Gators play football over the past 26 seasons, you’ve seen Richard Johnston, a bankruptcy attorney from Ft. Myers. But it is not his well-mannered, professional, board-certified legal skills that are on display. No, on football Saturdays, Johnston morphs into the madcap “Mr. Orange and Blue,” leading the Gator faithful in cheers and working the crowd into a frenzy — all while running around the field wearing his trademark Crocs clogs, one orange and one blue.“It is one of the biggest rushes I could ever imagine,” said Johnston, a Fowler White Boggs lawyer who described his role as a ringmaster who gets to “flip the switch” on 90,000 people. “I’m with all the cheerleaders; I have a 300-piece band behind me spelling the letters out. It is overwhelming to be able to rev them up. I know what I do is not the centerpiece, but it is an element of the electricity of Gator football.”He sees it as his job to build excitement to a peak and help make Ben Hill Griffin Stadium a tough place for opponents to play football.“I’m just a fan who escaped onto the field with a microphone,” Johnston said. “I don’t have any special training.”But he does have a history with UF, earning his undergraduate and law degrees from Florida and serving as a cheerleader in 1978 and 1980 — his senior year as an undergrad and his second year of law school, respectively. It was during his second stint as a rah-rah that he got on the microphone.“It was a good year to do it because we had just come off of 0-10-1, the first year of the Charlie Pell era. You could say ‘boo’ and they would scream,” Johnston said. “It was a good year. We were winning. It is always easier to be a cheerleader when you are winning.”He must have made a good impression. Three years later, when Johnston was toiling as a young lawyer at the venerable Ervin firm in Tallahassee, the Gators came calling.“I’m like, there is no way this conservative Tallahassee firm that is half full of Seminoles and half full of Gators is ever going to let me do this,” Johnston said.But the then-26-year-old summoned up the intestinal fortitude to approach senior partner Bob Ervin, a former Florida Bar president, about reprising his energetic role.“I said, ‘Bob, the university wants me to come in and get things revved up before the games on the football field. What do you think?’” Johnston said. “I’m wincing, waiting for the ‘no.’“And he says, ‘Why Richard, I think it is a marvelous idea. Do mention the firm’s name and telephone number while you are on the field,’” said Johnston, imitating Ervin’s gentlemanly Southern drawl.Now 51, Johnston still brings high energy to his game day cheers.“Anybody can announce,” he said. “I hope what I bring to the table is something that is a little more exciting and adds to the color and excitement of college football.”His job also entails making on-field introductions of those who have done great things for the university, including donors, those who have excelled in academics, and other athletes.“It is the epicenter of the Gator Nation, a moment when all the University of Florida’s fans’ eyes are focused on the field,” Johnston said. “And I want to make that moment for those people very special.”Johnston has not missed a home game in 26 years. Some of his greatest memories include the Gators’ 14-9 victory over Florida State in 1991; both teams were ranked in the top five that year. The Gators had just clinched their first SEC championship, and it took a late defensive stand in the fourth quarter to preserve the victory.“That may have been one of the most intense dogfights of a game I ever remember seeing,” he said.Another was in November 2006 against the Steve Spurrier-led University of South Carolina squad. With seconds to go, the Gamecocks lined up for a possibly game-winning 48-yard field goal that, if successful, would have likely ended any hope of the Gators’ national championship quest. But Florida’s 6-foot-6 defensive end Jarvis Moss blocked the kick, preserving a 17-16 victory.“It went from being so quiet — like a church — to just bedlam,” Johnston recalled.Florida went on to defeat Ohio State in the BCS National Championship game.He even got a national championship ring on the occasion of his 25th year on the sidelines.“It’s as big as a Volkswagen,” he said.Johnston is married to a Seminole fan who says her husband has the oddest hobby on Earth.“That is true,” admits Johnston, who jokingly adds he will keep working Gator games “until they pry the microphone out of my cold, dead hands.” October 15, 2009 Managing Editor Regular News ‘I’m just a fan who escaped onto the field with a microphone’ Mr. Orange and Bluelast_img read more

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Robinson’s camps teach youths ‘life skills’

first_img“It’s about as intense as you can get,” he said. “I mean you can’t put these kids through much more than we already do put them through.”But that’s what Robinson said makes the difference between his camps and others being offered.“Most sports camps are skill development,” he said. “(My training) has more to do with (work ethic) than just the technical part of it.”Robinson said the work ethic is something that goes a long way into giving youths a life skill.Larrieu said he hopes those skills will transfer into better results on the mat this coming year and possibly in the future at Minnesota.“This is a really big college that I look forward to hopefully coming to one year,” Larrieu said of the Minnesota wrestling program.Larrieu would break the streak of J Robinson campers coming to Minnesota. No current Gophers wrestler has been to Robinson’s camp before coming to school at Minnesota.But first, Larrieu has to complete his junior and senior year of high school.“These are high school kids that want to be good,” Robinson said. “They don’t know how to be good, and what we do is we teach them work ethic on how they can be successful.” Robinson’s camps teach youths ‘life skills’J Robinson’s intensive camps are one of six types of wrestling camps offered. Robert MewsJuly 19, 2006Jump to CommentsShare on FacebookShare on TwitterShare via EmailPrintDespite temperatures soaring past 90 degrees the past few days, a herd of runners still took to University streets with athletic improvement on their minds.These runners weren’t just any collection of athletes, but 14- to 18-year-olds who paid $2,149 to give up 28 days of summer fun for a life-altering experience at J Robinson’s intensive wrestling camp.“Last year I had a disappointing season (wrestling),” said Trenton Larrieu, a Spring Valley, Wis., high school wrestler, of his decision to come to the camp. “I figured this is the way to get better.”That is just what J Robinson, Minnesota’s wrestling coach for the past 20 years, had in mind when he started the camps for youths 28 years ago.Robinson has a variety of nationwide camps to choose from. Along with six types of wrestling camps, Robinson also has basketball and hockey camps.“I think you start them just like any other coach,” Robinson said. “You just start them as part of your program. Try and help the younger wrestlers get better.”But Robinson’s intensive camp isn’t like other camps.The 28-day camp is the longest of all of his camps, with a typical day starting at 6:30 a.m. and ending at 11 p.m. It includes plenty of running and weight lifting as well as unorthodox training techniques to help develop what Robinson calls “life skills.”“It’s hard. The intensity really picks up as the camp goes,” Larrieu said.Current Gophers wrestler Mack Reiter helps the youngsters train and said some can’t make it through because of the duration and intensity of training.last_img read more

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Impossible Knowledge: Are You an Expert?

first_imgThe Huffington Post:I grew up with a habitual overclaimer. He wildly exaggerated his expertise, at times claiming knowledge of things he couldn’t possibly know — people, events, ideas that simply do not exist. Being unfamiliar with overclaiming, I just called him a liar.I couldn’t have known the word “overclaimer,” nor the concept. The word didn’t exist and is only used today in the world of psychological science. Even so, we’re all familiar with these people who feel the need to overestimate what they know about the world. What underlies such assertions of impossible knowledge?Read the whole story: The Huffington PostWray Herbert is an author and award-winning journalist who writes two popular blogs for APS, We’re Only Human and Full Frontal Psychology. Follow Wray on Twitter @wrayherbert. More of our Members in the Media >last_img read more

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