MICAH MOSLEY — Many thanks deserved during National Teacher Appreciation Week

first_img Our Technology Staff continues to step up big by distributing devices to those in need. NISD provided our students that needed a device to complete the year with Chromebooks and/or iPads. Kudos to all of you, especially our Tech team getting everything ready for distribution.Our Teachers and Administrators came together, developed and rolled out a flexible education program to keep our students engaged and learning throughout the remaining school year.They continue to develop lessons weekly, all the while supporting their own families at home.Our team stuffs and mails over 1,200 paper packets to students that are unable to do the online learning or do not have Internet access. The online virtual meetings, coordination, frustration and questions to result in the best outcome possible for our students… all unprecedented! Coronavirus, Covid-19, “The Rona,” etc.There are many different names, but we will all remember the same pandemic for the rest of our lives. Whether it’s the many extra weeks off from school or work, the extraordinary safety measures or the terrible deaths of many, many Americans and people around the World, the virus and its effects will forever be ingrained in our memories.On a more focused local scale, one thing I will always remember is how the Nederland ISD Teachers, Support Staff and Administrators responded during the crisis: Our Child Nutrition Staff has passed out over 35,000 meals and continues daily. This exceptional team prides themselves on taking care of our students, especially those that may not have access to a solid meal day-to-day.They continue to come in, put together two solid meals for our students, distribute meals while wearing all of their PPE in rain or shine, show up the next day to repeat and all with a proud smile. Awesome job!Our Custodial Staff and Maintenance Team continues to keep operations going by regularly cleaning and sanitizing our buildings and working to ensure they are safe for essential work. We appreciate you!center_img So many times I have seen and read of parents and guardians thanking all of you for your video lessons, feedback and “thinking outside the box” to keep students engaged. Amazing work!I want to also thank the parents, grandparents and guardians for stepping up, assisting and keeping track of their student’s progress. Your efforts to keep them on track are more than appreciated!Last but certainly not least, our students. Their lives have been turned upside down.All of the schedules, rules and familiarity they have known are gone.They are experiencing something none of us ever had to experience at their age. I am proud to see their resiliency and ability to adapt to online learning, having parents as teachers, and spending more time with siblings than I am sure they would like.Being a part of hard discussions regarding the pandemic, family financial situations, and so much more. They will be leading our country one day and I, for one, can’t wait to see what they do!These are unprecedented times with unprecedented responses. I am so thankful and grateful to all of the Nederland ISD staff for rising up to the challenge, committing to excellence, and following Mr. Mallory’s mantra of “Adjust and Overcome.”When all of this is behind us, I look forward to seeing our District continue to excel, raise the bar, and exceed our motto of “Every Student. Every Day!”In the spirit of Teacher Appreciation Week and on behalf of the NISD Board of Trustees, simply but sincerely… Thank You!”Micah Mosley is president of the Nederland ISD Board of Trustees. He can be reached at [email protected]last_img read more

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SymQuest names Meg Fleming president

first_imgSymQuest,Vermont Business Magazine SymQuest Group, Inc, a wholly-owned subsidiary of Konica Minolta Business Solutions U.S.A., Inc(link is external), and regionally based IT services and office technology provider, has announced the appointment of Meg Fleming as President of SymQuest effective April 1, 2017. Fleming will succeed Co-Founder, and acting President and CEO, Larry Sudbay, after 21 years of service with SymQuest.Meg Fleming Symquest March 2017“I am very excited to announce Meg’s new role in our organization. Throughout her 25 year tenure with first McAuliffe Office Products, then SymQuest, Meg has shown exemplary leadership among her peers. Her ability to problem solve and manage large scale strategic objectives has shaped her skillset as an executive,” Sudbay said. “In addition to her professional leadership, her vision for client service delivery excellence will serve SymQuest well in the years to come.”Prior to her appointment as President, Fleming served in various positions within the company including: Chief Operating Officer, Client Support Manager, Service Manager, Director of Service and Regional Director of Sales. In addition to her professional experience, Fleming believes in giving back to the community. Fleming has previously held positions as Board Member for the St. Michael’s College Alumni Association, Board Member for the Girl Scouts of the Green and White Mountains, and acting Co-Chair of the Cambridge Conservation Commission – among other service activities. “I am honored to serve SymQuest as President. Our organization is comprised of exceptional employees focused on providing an outstanding customer experience to our clients,” Fleming said. “I believe our next step as an organization will be to innovate the way companies do business by providing solutions that bolster efficiencies and cost recovery through automated workflows, connected devices, and cloud services.” Fleming will be responsible for all departments and strategic initiatives throughout SymQuest’s nine office locations; and will be based in SymQuest’s dual-headquarters, located in South Burlington, Vt. and Westbrook, Maine. Fleming received a Bachelor’s of Arts in Psychology from St. Michael’s College in Colchester, Vt., and successfully completed Leadership Champlain, Northern Vermont’s premier leadership training program supported by the Lake Champlain Regional Chamber of Commerce. To learn more about SymQuest visit www.SymQuest.com(link is external).About SymQuest Group, Inc.Founded in 1996, SymQuest designs, installs, and hosts network infrastructures and printing environments of all sizes. SymQuest is a regionally based subsidiary of Konica Minolta Business Solutions U.S.A with locations in South Burlington and Rutland, VT, Plattsburgh and Watertown, NY, Keene and West Lebanon, NH and Westbrook and Lewiston, ME.  SymQuest has developed a national reputation for service excellence and innovation and is ranked Northern New England’s #1 managed IT services and copier provider by MSPmentor©. Learn more about our solutions at www.SymQuest.com(link is external). About Konica MinoltaKonica Minolta Business Solutions U.S.A., Inc. is reshaping and revolutionizing the Workplace of the Future™ (www.reshapework.com(link is external)). With our comprehensive portfolio, we deliver solutions to leverage mobility, cloud services, and optimize business processes with workflow automation. Our All Covered IT Services(link is external) division offers a range of IT strategy, support, and network security solutions across all verticals. Konica Minolta has been recognized as the #1 Brand for Customer Loyalty(link is external) in the MFP Office Copier Market by Brand Keys for ten consecutive years and is proud to be ranked on the Forbes 2016 America’s Best Employers list. Konica Minolta, Inc. has been named to the Dow Jones Sustainability World Index for five years in a row. We partner with our customers to give shape to ideas and work to bring value to our society. For more information, please visit: www.CountOnKonicaMinolta.com(link is external) and follow Konica Minolta on Facebook(link is external), YouTube(link is external), and Twitter(link is external)@KonicaMinoltaUS(link is external).Source: South Burlington, Vt. (March 03, 2017) – SymQuest Group, Inclast_img read more

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Rule would require lawyers to personally sign all trust checks

first_imgRule would require lawyers to personally sign all trust checks Rule would require lawyers to personally sign all trust checks It might cause some problems for small firms and sole practitioners, but a proposed rule amendment requiring that lawyers personally sign all trust account checks — and not sign blank checks — is the right thing to do, according to the Bar Board of Governors.The board, at its May 28 meeting, approved amendments to Rule 5-1.2. If approved by the Supreme Court, the rules specifically would prohibit attorneys from signing blank trust account checks, prohibit allowing nonlawyers to sign checks, and prohibit the use of a signature stamp on trust account checks.The board also approved a policy change that could see fewer public reprimands administered at board meetings.Board member Andy Sasso, chair of the Disciplinary Procedure Committee which proposed the trust account change, said the revision was generally supported by lawyers, although some small firm practitioners have expressed concern.“Almost all of them are saying, ‘That’s a great rule. Why didn’t we have that before?’” Sasso said. “But there is a segment of the Bar, sole practitioners who do residential real estate work, who are opposed. They’re delegating a lot of that real estate closing work to nonlawyers. What they’re saying is if this rule passes, they won’t be able to do real estate work while they’re on vacation or out of town.”Board member Dan DeCubellis said he’s worked in small firms for most of his career and thinks the rule is needed.“The idea of closing deals. . . where you don’t have any idea what’s happening should not be allowed, anyway,” he said. “You can do it [comply with the proposed rule], but it requires advance planning. I don’t see where we are going to be taking away anyone’s livelihood doing this. I think this is a rule we should have had for a long time.”Board member Ray Abadin agreed, noting there are a variety of documents, not just trust account checks, that a lawyer is personally required to sign and has to make arrangements for when traveling or on vacation.“I see this as one of the responsibilities that we have that emanates from our license,” he said. “We have responsibilities that go with our practice.”Board member Mary Ann Morgan, though, said the board should get input from the General Practice, Solo and Small Firm Section.“If you’ve got a small practice and you want to go to Europe on that 10-day trip, or you’re going to be gone for three months, you can’t do it,” Morgan said. “I’m a small firm practitioner and I can see it would be a hardship.”She said one law office used a CPA firm to write its checks, and while that meant it was done by a nonlawyer, CPAs are licensed and have fiduciary and professional obligations similar to lawyers.The board approved the change by voice vote, with some dissent. Public Reprimands The public reprimand issue saw the board amend Standing Board Policy 15.92, which requires that all public reprimands be administered by the Bar president at a board meeting. In the past, some reprimands were allowed to be done by judges in local courtrooms, and board members questioned whether all public reprimands, which are also published in Southern Second, needed to be personally administered as well.Debate on the board in past meetings focused on whether reprimands are an effective deterrent to bad behavior or merely humiliate the recipient, and whether they need to be personally administered in all cases. That led to the DPC working on a change to make the required appearance optional in some cases — a policy the board has been informally following for a year or so.As amended by the board, the new policy would leave the decision to the board member acting as the designated reviewer in the case, with advice from Bar staff counsel.Some board members expressed concerns the new policy might be too lenient. Board member Carl Schwait said he favored having all reprimands require a public appearance before the board.Board member Chobee Ebbets said he had mixed feelings.“It’s a scary thing to see. It is a sobering thing to see,” he said. “When I saw my first public reprimand [as a board member], I thought, ‘Dear God, that’s the last thing I want to happen to me.’”Bar President Jesse Diner summed up the debate: “Is it a deterrent, or is it a public flogging that shouldn’t happen?”He added, “This is still going to be a work in progress. You may want to pass the policy and see how we’re going to proceed with it.”The board voted 24-14 for the new policy.center_img June 15, 2010 Regular Newslast_img read more

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How the brain recognizes objects

first_imgLinkedIn When the eyes are open, visual information flows from the retina through the optic nerve and into the brain, which assembles this raw information into objects and scenes.Scientists have previously hypothesized that objects are distinguished in the inferior temporal (IT) cortex, which is near the end of this flow of information, also called the ventral stream. A new study from MIT neuroscientists offers evidence that this is indeed the case.Using data from both humans and nonhuman primates, the researchers found that neuron firing patterns in the IT cortex correlate strongly with success in object-recognition tasks. Share on Facebook Share Emailcenter_img “While we knew from prior work that neuronal population activity in inferior temporal cortex was likely to underlie visual object recognition, we did not have a predictive map that could accurately link that neural activity to object perception and behavior. The results from this study demonstrate that a particular map from particular aspects of IT population activity to behavior is highly accurate over all types of objects that were tested,” says James DiCarlo, head of MIT’s Department of Brain and Cognitive Sciences, a member of the McGovern Institute for Brain Research, and senior author of the study, which appears in the Journal of Neuroscience.The paper’s lead author is Najib Majaj, a former postdoc in DiCarlo’s lab who is now at New York University. Other authors are former MIT graduate student Ha Hong and former MIT undergraduate Ethan Solomon.Distinguishing objectsEarlier stops along the ventral stream are believed to process basic visual elements such as brightness and orientation. More complex functions take place farther along the stream, with object recognition believed to occur in the IT cortex.To investigate this theory, the researchers first asked human subjects to perform 64 object-recognition tasks. Some of these tasks were “trivially easy,” Majaj says, such as distinguishing an apple from a car. Others — such as discriminating between two very similar faces — were so difficult that the subjects were correct only about 50 percent of the time.After measuring human performance on these tasks, the researchers then showed the same set of nearly 6,000 images to nonhuman primates as they recorded electrical activity in neurons of the inferior temporal cortex and another visual region known as V4.Each of the 168 IT neurons and 128 V4 neurons fired in response to some objects but not others, creating a firing pattern that served as a distinctive signature for each object. By comparing these signatures, the researchers could analyze whether they correlated to humans’ ability to distinguish between two objects.The researchers found that the firing patterns of IT neurons, but not V4 neurons, perfectly predicted the human performances they had seen. That is, when humans had trouble distinguishing two objects, the neural signatures for those objects were so similar as to be indistinguishable, and for pairs where humans succeeded, the patterns were very different.“On the easy stimuli, IT did as well as humans, and on the difficult stimuli, IT also failed,” Majaj says. “We had a nice correlation between behavior and neural responses.”The findings support the hypothesis that patterns of neural activity in the IT cortex can encode object representations detailed enough to allow the brain to distinguish different objects, the researchers say.Model performanceThe researchers also tested more than 10,000 other possible models for how the brain might encode object representations. These models varied based on location in the brain, the number of neurons required, and the time window for neural activity.Some of these models, including some that relied on V4, were eliminated because they performed better than humans on some tasks and worse on others.“We wanted the performance of the neurons to perfectly match the performance of the humans in terms of the pattern, so the easy tasks would be easy for the neural population and the hard tasks would be hard for the neural population,” Majaj says.The research team now aims to gather even more data to ask if this model or similar models can predict the behavioral difficulty of object recognition on each and every visual image — an even higher bar than the one tested thus far. That might require additional factors to be included in the model that were not needed in this study, and thus could expose important gaps in scientists’ current understanding of neural representations of objects.They also plan to expand the model so they can predict responses in IT based on input from earlier parts of the visual stream.“We can start building a cascade of computational operations that take you from an image on the retina slowly through V1, V2, V4, until we’re able to predict the population in IT,” Majaj says. Share on Twitter Pinterestlast_img read more

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Teaching children how to cope with life’s challenges

first_imgShare on Facebook Email Share on Twitter Share “What we have found with our work is that starting these conversations about coping early on helps children develop good coping habits,” says Associate Professor Frydenberg. “We need to teach children to manage those worries so they don’t become uncontrollable worries because that’s what poor mental health is – when you don’t feel you have the resources to manage situations that are challenging or difficult. It’s inevitable that we’ll have anxiety as we go through life but problems occur when it goes on for too long without being managed or dealt with.”How can parents help children develop helpful coping strategies?Associate Professor Frydenberg FAPS says parents can help children to cope by discouraging unhelpful strategies – like excessive crying, tantrums, blaming oneself and anger – and encouraging helpful strategies such as asking for help, saying sorry and staying calm.She says encouraging children to talk to an adult about their worries is particularly effective when it leads to conversations about coping. In fact, children as young as four and five have, on average, 36 ways of describing how they cope that can be used in conversations.“What parents can do is acknowledge the upset of children and talk about the different ways children can deal with a situation,” says Associate Professor Frydenberg. “We find that even saying that to children generally develops a positive reaction and generates some ideas about what they could do.”And as with all things parenting, modelling helpful coping skills is a powerful teaching strategy. “Adults are role models and children learn from adults,” says Associate Professor Frydenberg. “It’s important for adults to think about their own coping skills.”Assoc. Professor Frydenberg is presenting her work at the Australian Psychological Society Congress 2016, in Melbourne, 13-16 September.center_img Just like adults, young children have worries that cause stress. Adults may worry about job security or a fight with a partner, while children may stress about a friend moving away or losing their favourite toy. But in much the same way as grown-ups, children who use positive coping strategies are more likely to work through their worries, reduce stress and bounce back from difficulties. And children who develop these helpful coping strategies are more likely to become resilient, mentally healthy adults. Who are the best teachers of coping skills for children? You guessed it: parents.Why are coping skills important?Coping skills are what we think and do to help us get through difficult situations, which, as much as we wish they weren’t, are an unavoidable part of life. Psychologist Associate Professor Erica Frydenberg from the Melbourne Graduate School of Education says for children aged four to six these situations are often things like saying goodbye to a parent at kinder or school, having to try something new or wanting to belong to a group of friends.She says helping children to cope with these sorts of worries will equip them with skills to cope with adult-sized problems later in life and help to reduce the risk of mental health problems like depression and anxiety, which affect an estimated one in seven school-age children. LinkedIn Pinterestlast_img read more

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Women higher in masculine honor beliefs are more likely to endorse their own use of deception to reject romantic advances

first_imgEmail A study recently published in the Journal of Social and Personal Relationships provides new insights into the relationship between masculine honor beliefs and women’s endorsement of various rejection-related behaviors.The findings indicate that these beliefs are also related to expectations of men’s retaliatory aggression in response to being rejected.“We first became interested in this topic due to unsettling news reports we have read over the past few years regarding women being assaulted –ranging from verbal abuse to physical violence, even death — by men for rejecting or not reciprocating his romantic interest,” said study author Evelyn Stratmoen of Kansas State University. Share on Facebook Share LinkedIncenter_img Pinterest Share on Twitter “While there may be several factors that would explain why men may choose to engage in aggression when responding to romantic rejection, we research social phenomena influenced by adherence to masculine honor beliefs — cultural norms based on the American Southern culture of honor which consist of expectations that men use aggression to defend and uphold their reputation against threats and insults.”“Therefore, we questioned specifically how adherence to masculine honor ideology influences men’s choices to engage (or not engage) in aggression as a response to being romantically rejected.”“Furthermore, we were also interested in how specifically women’s adherence to masculine honor ideology influenced her own behaviors in situations where she does not reciprocate and thus may need to reject a man’s romantic interest – do they choose to be direct in telling a man she’s not interested? Or, do they choose to not be direct, but rather choose to use other ways to avoid rejecting him directly, such as ignoring him, or giving him a false phone number?”“These are avoidant rejection strategies that women tend to use when navigating these types of interactions, and we were interested in examining how their own adherence to masculine honor ideology influenced their use of various rejection strategies.”Stratmoen examined these questions in two studies with 517 undergraduate students in total.In the first study, the researchers assessed the masculine honor beliefs of 194 female undergraduate students before examining how the participants would respond to a hypothetical situation in which they wanted to reject an unwanted romantic advance from a man. The researchers also asked how they thought the man would respond to the rejection.Participants who scored high on the measure of masculine honor beliefs agreed with statements such as “It is important for a man to be able to take pain,” “A man should be embarrassed if someone calls him a wimp,” and “If a man is insulted, his manhood is insulted.”In the second study of 323 undergraduate students, Stratmoen and her colleagues examined the participant’s beliefs about a hypothetical scenario in which a woman rejected a man’s unwanted romantic advance by stating she has a boyfriend.In one version of the scenario, the man learns through a friend that the woman had lied about having a boyfriend. In another version, the man learns that she did not deceive him and was being truthful.“We found people higher in masculine honor beliefs perceive a man being romantically rejected as a threat to his honor (i.e., an insult to him and a threat to his reputation), and women higher in masculine honor beliefs are more likely to endorse their own use of passive/avoidant rejection techniques — including deception (i.e., falsely stating she has a boyfriend),” Stratmoen told PsyPost.“We also found men higher in masculine honor beliefs are more likely to perceive women’s use of deception as a rejection technique as a greater threat to a man’s honor. Furthermore, people overall (regardless of their MHBs) expect men to engage in retaliatory aggression after being rejected when the woman used a deceptive rejection technique.”“Additionally, we found women higher in masculine honor beliefs expressed greater expectations of men to engage in retaliatory aggression against other women when they reject men, regardless if a deceptive rejection technique was used,” Stratmoen said.The researchers were particularly surprised to find that women high in masculine honor beliefs expressed lower expectations of men’s aggression after rejection in the first study, but expressed higher expectations in the second.“An interesting finding — and one that needs to be addressed in future research — was the seemingly contradictory results between our two studies,” Stratmoen explained.“When we examined women’s first-person perspectives in the first study — by asking them what they would do when rejecting a man’s romantic interest — we found women higher in masculine honor beliefs were less likely to expect men to react aggressively against her when she rejects him. However, when we examined third-person perspectives in the second study, we found women higher in MHBs were more likely to expect men to react aggressively against another woman.”“Therefore, this apparent contradiction may be produced by a possible disconnect in personal experiences versus expected potential for men’s retaliatory aggression: perhaps women higher in masculine honor beliefs may not have personally experienced men’s retaliatory aggression when rejecting him, but they do perceive the potential for his aggression, nevertheless,” Stratmoen continued.“This may then explain their endorsement for using deflective — even deceptive — rejection strategies: by not rejecting his romantic advances outright, they are lessening the potential for his retaliatory aggression against them. This is a key question for future research that holds interesting implications.”The study, “‘Sorry, I already have a boyfriend’: Masculine honor beliefs and perceptions of women’s use of deceptive rejection behaviors to avert unwanted romantic advances“, was authored by Evelyn Stratmoen, Emilio D. Rivera, and Donald A. Saucier.last_img read more

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Bring In The Water

first_imgIt was an angry group, and with good reason.Wainscott residents are scared and worried. They are learning what folks in Westhampton and Hampton Bays and numerous other places around the country are also finding out.PFCs, contaminants related to fire retardant materials and fire-fighting foam, and related products, are in our drinking water. The government has been soft-soaping the dangers for decades, duped by 3M and the other companies that manufactured the chemicals and/or used them in their product.East Hampton Town Board members are being accused of dragging their feet since the contaminants were discovered in Wainscott drinking wells six months ago. They sent over plastic bottles of drinking water, but the gesture offers little consolation to those who are living with this stuff, bathing in it, and giving it to their kids and grandchildren.Jeff Bragman, who was elected to the East Hampton Town Board last November and took office in January, revealed that he started urging the town to pay for county water to be piped in back in March and to provide intricate filtration systems until that can be accomplished. These things take time, we get that.But something more sinister may be taking place. As we reported several weeks ago, the town knew about the contamination in January 2017, a year earlier than it let on. And there is anecdotal evidence that the town was told in 2016, during the previous administration, and didn’t even bother to take well samples. The 3M company recently agreed to pay Minnesota $850 million to settle a similar suit; in this case, the town owns the land (the airport) where the pollution is concerned and might well share the liability.All of this is conjecture. What needs to happen, now, is to bring the filtration systems and county water in, even if the town has to reimburse every individual in Wainscott who opts to bring it in. In fact, this is a rich community; the town could opt to put up all the money immediately and fill in the paperwork later.Has your community been tested? Has your municipality begun to understand that a cover-up went on, a massive effort to convince all concerned that this stuff wasn’t dangerous? Find out. Sharelast_img read more

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Woolf at the door

first_imgThe ‘statutorily senile’ Lord Woolf, to quote his own words, entertained a capacity crowd last week with a lecture to the London Solicitors Litigation Association. The former lord chief justice was on fine form, Obiter is pleased to report. Spare no sympathy for criminal lawyers in portakabins, he said, referring to overcrowding at Woolwich Crown Court. ‘We civil litigators will be lucky to get portaloos.’ Woolf, who was the author of the sweeping Woolf reforms of the civil justice system in 1999, said he had never understood why people took on litigation, but was grateful they had enabled him to ‘earn an honest crust’ at the bar. Transparency, of which he had been a strong advocate, could be taken too far, however. He recalled a surgeon who was due to operate on his elderly mother, who recognised Woolf for his clinical negligence work. Exacting revenge, the surgeon treated Woolf’s ageing mum to rather more transparency than she really wanted by giving her a slice-by-slice preview of the operation she was about to undergo. Woolf took questions after the lecture, but warned he would soon ‘rush off’ to the launch of the Supreme Court: ‘I can’t miss a free drink from the lord chancellor.’ Obiter raises a glass in salute.last_img read more

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Vanløse link inaugurated

first_imgPHASE 2b of København’s automated metro was opened on October 12, extending Lines M1 and M2 west from Frederiksberg to Vanløse (RG 1.03 p31). The inauguration comes five months after completion of Phase 2a between Nørreport and Frederiksberg, which was opened by Queen Margrethe on May 29.The latest 2·8 km extension has been built by Fredriksbergbaneselskabet, a separate company jointly owned by the metro and Fredriksberg community. Only 0·7 km is in tunnel, with the remainder of the route following a surface alignment formerly used by S-bane suburban services. Intermediate stations have been provided at Lindevang and Solbjerg, and a third is under construction at Flintholm, which will provide interchange with services on the S-bane ring line when it opens on January 24.On October 15 Metro promoter Ørestadsselskabet announced that it had signed a DKr511m contract with a consortium of Hoffmann A/S and the Arkil-Novejfa I/S joint venture for construction and fitting out of metro Phase 3. The 4·1 km extension of Line M2 from Lergravsparken to København airport will add a further five stations. Construction was expected to get underway on November 1, with civil works to be complete by the end of 2005; the line is due to open in 2007.last_img read more

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Nairobi Metropolitan Services will shut over 80 illegal city dumpsites

first_imgNMS Director-General Mohamed Badi. /Social Media Related Uganda arrests, charges 80 with illegal entry Nairobi’s main dumpsite in Dandora is over three times full, holding more than 1.8 million tonnes of solid waste against its 500,000 tonnes capacity. More than 80 illegal dumpsites in the city will be closed down as Nairobi Metropolitan Services (NMS) goes after garbage cartels in the capital. Pressure on Nairobi National park as the city expandscenter_img NMS Director-General Mohamed Badi said that since coming into office in March, his administration had identified 110 such illegal dumping areas and cleared 82 of solid waste with enforcement for closure ongoing.NMS Director-General Mohamed Badi. /Social Media The NMS boss said they were in the process of designating 35 official solid waste collection points. The National Youth Service was contracted by NMS to help in garbage collection across the 85 wards in the county. The move follows a directive by President Uhuru Kenyatta to NMS to crack down on all illegal dumpsites in the capital as well as gazette legal solid waste dumpsites for both public and private solid waste collectors. Nairobi ranked most expensive city for private schools in Africalast_img read more

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