Pete Seeger, Folk Legend, Dies at 94

first_imgAnyone who is remotely connected to folk music is undoubtedly familiar with Pete Seeger, an iconic singer/songwriter who passed away yesterday at the age of 94. Seeger was an icon from the beginning, rallying against McCarthyism and inspiring musicians like Bob Dylan to create music with a message of social change.Mr. Seeger began his career as a member of The Weavers, a successful group that scored hits with a cover of Lead Belly’s “Goodnight Irene” and the band’s original, “If I Had A Hammer.” The music spurred an American folk revival, as Seeger championed the causes of the labor movement in the 1940’s and 1950’s. Unfortunately, pressure from the US government ended the tenure of The Weavers, as Seeger had previously registered as a member of the Communist party. Never feeling comfortable in the spotlight, Seeger spent several years recording albums while mostly staying out of the public eye, appearing infrequently to promote various causes.Eventually, Seeger found ways to instill his positive values to the community. In 1959, he was a founding member of the Newport Folk Festival – a tradition still running to this day! He continued to rally against the Vietnam War throughout the 60’s and 70’s, writing the song “Waist Deep in the Big Muddy.” He also campaigned for environmental causes throughout his career.In the end, Seeger recorded well over 100 albums. His music, like the folk interpretation of the spiritual “We Shall Overcome,” has slowly seeped into the fabric of American culture. In fact, in 2006, Bruce Springsteen recorded a Pete Seeger-tribute album entitled We Shall Overcome: The Seeger Sessions.Bruce Springsteen and Pete Seeger even performed together as recently as 2009, playing Woody Guthrie’s “This Land Is Your Land” at President Obama’s inauguration. About the performance, Seeger stated that his “job is to show folks there’s a lot of good music in this world, and if used right it may help to save the planet.”All in all, Pete Seeger has left this world with a legacy of social justice and optimism. To quote the singer: “The key to the future of the world is finding the optimistic stories and letting them be known.” -David Melamed (@DMelamz)last_img read more

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Happy Birthday To The Legendary Paul Simon [Videos]

first_imgPaul Simon, one of the most prolific songwriters of the 20th century, is celebrating his 79th birthday today. The Newark, NJ-born musician spent his formative years growing up in Flushing, Queens. During elementary school, Simon met Art Garfunkel, with the duo eventually going on to form Simon & Garfunkel, and write hit folk tunes such as “The Sound of Silence,” “The Boxer,” “Bridge Over Troubled Water,” and “Mrs. Robinson.”Following Simon & Garfunkel’s initial breakup in 1970, Simon’s official solo career began with his eponymous album Paul Simon in 1972, which featured “Me And Julio Down By The Schoolyard” and the reggae-infused “Mother And Child Reunion.” Perhaps his best-known solo album, 1986’s Graceland, saw Simon take a trip to Johannesburg, South Africa, to play record with a number of African musicians in various musical stylings, including zydeco, mbaqanga, pop, and isicathamiya. What came out of those sessions back in the U.S. was Graceland, which went on to win a Grammy Award for Album of the Year in 1987 with “Under African Skies,” “Diamonds On The Soles Of Her Shoes,” and the title track, among others.Simon hasn’t let up much in his later years, touring with Bob Dylan, reuniting with Art Garfunkel several times, and releasing a number of new album, including 2000’s You’re The One, the 2006 collaborative album Surprise with super producer Brian Eno, 2011’s So Beautiful Or So What, and his most recent release in June of last year, Stranger To Stranger. With over 60 years of songwriting under his belt, to describe Paul Simon as prolific is almost an understatement. Let’s take a look at some songs from his storied career as we celebrate his 77th birthday today:Paul Simon – “You Can Call Me Al”[Video: PaulSimonVEVO]Paul Simon – “Late In The Evening”[Video: HD_AUDIO]Paul Simon – “Under African Skies”[Video: Paul Simon – Topic]Paul Simon – “Me And Julio Down By The Schoolyard”[Video:PaulSimonVEVO][Originally published 10/13/17]last_img read more

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Activist discusses her experience as leader of the anti-abortion movement

first_imgThe president and founder of Live Action, a non-profit committed to ending abortion, delivered the keynote lecture of Notre Dame Right to Life’s Respect Life Week on Thursday evening in the Carey Auditorium. During the lecture, titled “Transforming the Abortion Debate,” Lila Rose spoke about her work to advance the anti-abortion movement.Rose opened her talk with an anecdote about a recent experience she had while jogging near her home in Berkeley, California.“I was going on a jog and I was running on one of these main streets … and I jogged by a really cute looking shop,” Rose said. “I stopped in and it was a clothing store … and all the sudden I see this tote bag.”The tote bag was a Planned Parenthood tote bag. Rose described it as listing all of the services Planned Parenthood claims to offer, and said she brought the bag-listed services that Planned Parenthood does not actually offer to the attention of the store’s clerk.“All of the sudden, her face, her countenance changed pretty dramatically and she said, ‘I don’t want to talk about it,’” Rose said. “I said, ‘OK, well, I just want to understand why you’re selling it here. Did you know that Planned Parenthood is actually the largest abortion provider in the country?’ And again she just said, ‘I don’t want to talk about this right now.’ I said a quick prayer and I walked out of the shop.”Rose said she was struck by how quickly the clerk’s demeanor changed and how unwilling the clerk was to have a conversation about abortion. She said she believed this anecdote was consistent with a trend of people closing their minds and refusing to have a conversation about abortion. Rose believes this closing comes from a sense of “woundedness” that originates in the aftermath of abortions, she said.Though raised in a Protestant family, Rose is now a Catholic in northern California, she said. Because she was homeschooled, Rose said, there were many books in her house. She said her “aha moment” about abortion came when she found a pro-life book, “A Handbook on Abortion,” on her parents’ shelf that detailed the practice of abortion, and that an image of an aborted fetus in the book affected her deeply.Rose said she remembered thinking, “Is this real?”Rose was inspired by the teachings of St. Mother Theresa of Calcutta, who opposed abortion, she said.“Whenever [Calcutta] gave public speeches, she would often give strong admonitions — to the United States, specifically — about abortion,” Rose said.Rose’s organization, Live Action, carries out undercover and hidden camera investigations into Planned Parenthood and other abortion providers. Rose remembered her first time going undercover, at the University of California–Los Angeles health center when she was an undergraduate, to investigate why she never saw any pregnant women on campus. When she entered the facility, pretending to be pregnant, the only option given to her was to have an abortion, Rose said.“This is why there are no pregnant women on campus,” she said. “Because of this anti-motherhood, [this] fear of our ability as women to be able to be mothers. This negative mindset about pregnancy, about motherhood, about our potential as women to be able to create life.”Rose described the work her organization carries out in detail. She said undercover investigations of Planned Parenthood have revealed that the organization does not offer all the services it claims to offer and also adheres to a “don’t ask, don’t tell” policy about sexual abuse. She described a Planned Parenthood event in Seattle where women were encouraged to “shout” about their abortions.“I think behind that shout is a deep wound,” Rose said.One of the focuses of Live Action is telling the stories of various people who have previously been involved with abortions, including women who have had the procedure, abortionists and their aides. Through the work of Live Action and the stories such people are able to tell, Rose said, “hearts and minds” are starting to change.Ultimately, Rose said the debate surrounding abortion is about what constitutes a human life.“As we are fighting something so horrific, we are proclaiming something so beautiful and so good,” Rose said. “And to be truly and wholly pro-life, we proclaim the goodness of life. One of the quotes that I love is from St. Augustine, and he said that people travel the world to marvel at the height of the mountains, at the circular motions of the stars, at the vast oceans. But people pass by themselves without wondering. St. Augustine of course is saying how wonderful is the human person, made in the image and likeness of God.“How wonderful our ability, our freedom, our ability to choose, how wonderful our lives. We’re purposed for good; we’re purposed for love. And that is the heart of this battle, that’s the heart of our message.”Tags: Abortion, anti-abortion, Notre Dame Right to Life, Pro-life, Respect Life Weeklast_img read more

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Learning hubs for virtual education grow in popularity in northern Johnson County, but traditional childcare providers raise concerns

first_imgWith the start of an unprecedented school year that has tens of thousands of students across Johnson County learning remotely for at least a few days each week, many working families have started to look for educational alternatives for their children.Shawnee Mission’s roughly 27,000 students are all learning remotely for the time being, while other public school districts in Johnson County have many students in hybrid learning mode, splitting time between home and school. As a result, some parents have begun forming “learning pods” with other parents to have their children learn in small groups at home. Meanwhile, some nonprofits, churches, entertainment companies and Johnson County itself, have all launched their own learning hubs in recent weeks to support kids and families still enrolled in traditional schools.This story is not a comprehensive report of all available alternative learning options in northern Johnson County. Instead, we’ve identified a handful of approaches for remote learning support and also heard some counterpoints by local childcare providers with concerns about child safety and unfair competition.Following the Shawnee Mission Board of Education’s decision last week to begin transitioning elementary students to in-person learning in October, some of these learning hubs are preparing for the fluctuation of enrollment numbers in their programs in the coming weeks.Colonial Church Y Academy: ‘It’s taking a village to be able to do this.’Students participate in the learning hub at the Johnson County Arts & Heritage Center. Photo courtesy Johnson County Park and Recreation District.Johnson County Park and Recreation District is offering remote learning support for students enrolled in local schools. Jill Leiker, wellness manager for JCPRD, said these learning hubs align with guidance from the Johnson County Department Health and Environment.“We just feel like we have an opportunity to help our community and provide safe and impactful places for kids to do their learning,” Leiker said, noting that all JCPRD staff doing supervision have gone through background checks.“It’s taking a village to be able to do this,” she added. “We made this commitment to the community to be able to help people and to be able to do these, no matter how long they last, which is a huge staff commitment but something that we know is necessary in our community.”The YMCA of Greater Kansas City also revamped its after-school care programs and summer camps to offer full-day learning academies as remote learning support. Colonial Church in Prairie Village hosts one of these called Colonial Church Y Academy.Shawn Mayberry at Colonial Church Y Academy helps a student with one of his assignments.Led by co-directors Shawn Mayberry and Jackie Perkins, the academy launched Sept. 8 and has 21 children currently enrolled. Both co-directors said the students have been “fantastic.”“I think they were ready to be with people again,” Perkins said. “That’s the problem, was they haven’t been with people since March.”Supervisors of learning pods aren’t necessarily teachers — some are, but many of them are simply employees of the company or nonprofit they run. While they aren’t trained to teach, parents may not be trained either.“After last year, these kids are going to be behind,” Perkins said. “What we’re trying to offer is a safe option for the parents who can’t afford the really expensive learning pod, but it’s somewhere where the kid can go and they have a chance to do better than they would on their own.”Mayberry and Perkins said all staff must complete background checks and go through extensive training each year. Citing the health risks of COVID-19, staff require parents to wait outside for drop-off and pick-up.YMCA offers flexible scheduling as well as financial assistance for some families like the Vestal family in Overland Park.“I feel lucky to have found this place because I don’t know what I would have done without it.” Krisha Vestal shares about her experience sending her four children to Colonial Church Y Academy.Krisha Vestal, a single mother of four students who attend John Diemer Elementary in the Shawnee Mission district, said she’s grateful to have an affordable space for her children to learn while she works her full-time finance career.She says she found out about Colonial Y by searching for local learning hubs on the Internet.“I was at a loss as to how I, a single mother of four, was going to handle that while working full time from home,” Vestal said. “I feel lucky to have found this place because I don’t know what I would have done without it.”Vestal said she made the best decision she could, considering her family’s mental health and educational well-being. She plans to keep bringing her children to the learning hub for as long as necessary, or until school opens back up.“I feel like so many parents are just wondering if they’re doing the right thing,” Vestal said. “It’s your child, you know what’s best for them. Parents shouldn’t feel guilty by what they choose just because it’s something different from what other people are choosing.”Harvest Ridge Covenant Church: ‘We can … be a blessing.’Harvest Ridge Covenant Church in Shawnee also launched its learning space last week. Staff have found less interest than anticipated — three students are enrolled — but they’re prepared to host up to 53 students to be grouped in smaller learning pods. The church also offers flexible scheduling and financial assistance.“After we’ve heard the need, the goal is that we can hopefully be a blessing to those who need a safe place for their students to learn,” said Tiffany Flanagan, co-pastor of the church.Merle Dunn, a sixth grader at Lexington Trails Middle, said he prefers in-person learning and thinks older students can handle all of the COVID-19 safety measures like wearing masks and sanitizing. He’s learning virtually on some days at Harvest Ridge Covenant Church in Shawnee.Merle Dunn, a sixth grader at Lexington Trails Middle School in USD 232 in De Soto, spends some days at school each week and some days learning virutally at Harvest Ridge. He says remote learning is different, and school can be “complicated” trying to keep up with rules like hand-washing and wearing masks. But overall, things are going well so far.“You can do more stuff faster on the computer, but you don’t get help that fast, because if you raise your hand, the teacher is going to come to you within the next five minutes,” Merle said. “But (now) you have to email, and they’ve got quite a few kids emailing, so it could take up to half an hour.”Stephanie Dunn, Merle’s mother, said the Harvest Ridge’s program has been “incredible” for her family, who just moved to De Soto.“It’s been a real solitary summer for him, so for him to be able to go anywhere is great,” Dunn said. “They’re very welcoming, and I feel like they’ve really worked hard to make it a good functioning space. He has enjoyed it and has been productive, so I think they’re doing a great job.”Flanagan said staff are all required to go through background checks and child safety training. They’re also connecting students with tutors on specific subjects like math, science and language arts.Sky Zone offering SkyStudySky Zone, a trampoline park company with a location in Shawnee, extended its Sky Camp program (also called SkyStudy), which opened Sept. 1.Mandy Carter, regional marketing manager for Sky Zone, said they offer flexible learning options for students. The party rooms become learning spaces, and the rest of the trampoline park is the venue for recess.“As a parent myself — and a lot of our team members are parents — we realized during this time we need as many options as possible to consider because every family is in a different situation, whether it’s financially, scheduling wise, maybe kids aren’t having face to face opportunities,” Carter said. “The last thing that parents need is to have to make a choice that they weren’t satisfied with.”Carter said staff are required to complete background checks, wear masks and complete cleaning regimens.Childcare providers urge safety measures, consistency for learning hubsBeth Kirk, a childcare provider in Shawnee, is concerned that learning hubs are non-licensed and create unfair competition for daycares like hers.Some daycare providers have raised concerns that learning hubs and other alternative learning spaces lack consistency and safety standards for children and families, and also create unfair competition for their businesses.“Right now, families are in a situation where they don’t have adequate support for where to put their kids in this time of year,” said Emily Barnes, owner of Barnes Childcare in Olathe. “Knowing how hard my colleagues and I have worked in the last six months, it initially felt unfair that we would work so hard and here now this potential for unlicensed care… it could potentially take business away.”Barnes, who is also advocacy chairperson for Child Care Provider Coalition of Kansas, a nonprofit supporting family childcare providers across the state, said she hasn’t personally lost business due to the learning hubs. Initially, she was also “very skeptical and concerned” with how quickly learning hubs emerged.Beth Kirk, owner of Beth Kirk’s Daycare in Shawnee, echoed some of those concerns, primarily because learning hubs are not required to be licensed. Daycares like hers — which are capped at 12 children — must spend time and money to complete background checks and extensive training in order to be licensed.Sky Zone offers supervised learning spaces at many of its locations, including this one in Shawnee. Photo courtesy Sky Zone.Unlicensed learning pods, in her mind, have an unfair advantage by skipping those steps and could put children’s safety at risk.“There’s so many different areas of training that we can take to better ourselves to provide a better environment for our families and the kids, but these other people, they don’t ever have to do a minute of training,” Kirk said. “It’s about keeping the kids safe.”Kirk said she’s seen daycares take a hit nationwide, as families opt to keep their children home, or a family member tests positive or gets exposed and needs to quarantine for two weeks at a time.“I can say I don’t know a daycare provider who hasn’t had a loss from this,” Kirk said, noting she lost about half of her business during the pandemic, although some of that business has returned.Barnes said she wants to make sure parents know how to look for high-quality programs that ensure their children’s safety. For instance, she says, learning hubs should require background checks and put staff through training, and also follow industry guidance from the Johnson County Department of Health and Environment.“I believe, truly that parents really are trying to do what it takes to take care of their families. Every family has thought about every option so much, and every provider who is providing care has weighed every single option,” Barnes said. “So I know, at the base of everything, you really truly have a situation where the majority of people are simply trying to make good things come out of what feels like a really impossible situation.”last_img read more

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Lawmakers scrutinize drug-injury related legal ads

first_imgLawmakers scrutinize drug-injury related legal ads The Florida Legislature is exploring regulating legal advertisements seeking potential clients who may have been harmed by prescription drugs or medical devices — although there may be no Florida lawyers or law firms running such ads.The House Subcommittee on Civil Justice held a January 16 workshop on the issue. In the Senate, Sen. Tom Wright, R-Port Orange, has introduced SB 1288, which would make it a first-degree misdemeanor for failing to make certain disclaimers and disclosures in ads or trying to look like official government warning.The legislative activity follows a letter sent by the Federal Trade Commission to seven law firms and legal aggregator companies last September. The FTC said misleading ads could cause harm to consumers if they stop taking prescribed medication or using medical devices.According to Wright’s bill, the ads have flashing words like “medical alert,” “health alert,” “consumer alert,” “public service announcement;” may refer to a recall when no government agency has made a recall; and may use the seal of the Food and Drug Administration or a seal that appears to come from a government agency. They may also fail to reveal the drug or device retains FDA approval, who the sponsor of the ad is, that it is a solicitation for legal services, or state where the legal services would be provided.The FTC did not name the seven “legal practitioners and lead generators” that received its letter, but during the Civil Justice meeting, William Large, of the Florida Justice Reform Institute, said his research showed none of the seven were in Florida, and most or all were trying to attract potential clients that they then referred to other law firms.One, he said, was a Texas law firm that, despite running more than 11,000 ads, has only 20 cases throughout the country, which showed it is referring inquiries, and another is a California company with a post office box address.“The problem is not Florida Bar members,” Large said. “The problem is lead generators and aggregators who are out of state.”The subcommittee invited testimony from Florida Bar Ethics Counsel Elizabeth Tarbert, Florida State University Law Professor Elissa Gentry, and Jimmy Gustafson, a partner at Searcy, Denney, Scarola, Barnhart & Shipley.Tarbert outlined how the Bar regulates lawyer advertising and said The Florida Bar is considered to have the strictest lawyer advertising rules in the nation. In response to a question, Tarbert said the Bar cannot directly regulate out-of-state legal aggregators or lead companies, but can discipline Bar members who take cases from companies or law firms that do not follow Bar advertising and solicitation rules.Gentry said, “There seems to be good evidence that drug injury advertisements do affect risk perception.” However, she added that studies don’t yet show that those ads affect behavior.Gustafson — who said his firm might write about dangerous prescription drugs and medical devices on its blog but does not advertise on the issue — warned legislators that regulating lawyer advertising is difficult because it is protected commercial speech.“Truthful lawyer advertisements that tell the truth about dangers of drugs or devices is protected First Amendment speech,” he said. “It does a public service; it does a public good.”He also noted that drug companies have been deficient in reporting adverse reactions to the FDA, and the reports that are submitted are many times incomplete. A Harvard study, he continued, showed 1.9 million people are hospitalized each year after taking prescription drugs, 840,000 patients in hospitals have severe reactions to medications, and 128,000 people die each year after taking prescriptions.Gustafson said The Florida Bar already does a good job of regulating lawyer ads, adding, “I am personally proud of the system that the Bar has put in, I’m proud of the way they enforce it…. I think it’s fair and I think it’s rigorous and I think they do a good job with it.”He also explained his firm’s decision to advertise, saying partners determined years ago that, “If you’re not going to advertise, you’re going to end up working for somebody who does.”Civil Justice Subcommittee Chair Rep. Bob Rommel, R-Naples, indicated the House subcommittee is likely to pursue the issue.“We definitely don’t want to infringe on the First Amendment, but we may need to do something to help, even if it helps save one life,” he said. “We hear in these chambers all the time that even if it saves one life, it’s worth doing.”SB 1288 acknowledges that under the Florida Constitution, the Supreme Court regulates lawyers and that Bar rules regulate advertising. But it also finds that “the pervasive extent of these unethical practices necessitates that the Legislature exercise the state’s police power to further curtail these unethical practices….”The bill specifies anyone who violates its provisions violates the state’s deceptive and unfair trade law (Fla. Ch. 501) and commits a first-degree misdemeanor. If the advertising intended to get confidential health information to sell or otherwise benefit the advertiser, then the violation becomes a second-degree felony.The bill has been assigned to the Criminal Justice, Judiciary, and Rules committees but has not been placed on an agenda. Jan 24, 2020 By Gary Blankenship Senior Editor Top Storieslast_img read more

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Carol Kruse Elected To Valvoline Board Of Directors

first_imgValvoline has announced the election of Carol Kruse, chief marketing officer of Cambia Health Solutions, to its board of directors, effective Dec. 4.AdvertisementClick Here to Read MoreAdvertisement“Carol is an extremely accomplished marketing professional, excelling in consumer brand marketing, sports and entertainment marketing, technology platform design and development, and consumer acquisition, retention and engagement through digital, mobile and social channels,” said Stephen Kirk, chairman of the board at Valvoline. “She is as equally comfortable with consumer insights and creative delivery as she is with data and technology. Carol’s deep knowledge and experience in these areas will be invaluable to Valvoline and we are excited to have her join our board.”Kruse has been senior vice president and chief marketing officer of Cambia Health Solutions since 2014. Cambia Health Solutions is a nonprofit total health solutions company consisting of 20 companies reaching more than 70 million Americans nationwide. Before assuming this role, she served as senior vice president and chief marketing officer at ESPN. Prior to that, she spent nearly 10 years at The Coca-Cola Co., moving from vice president of interactive marketing to vice president, global digital marketing.She holds a master’s degree in business administration from the University of Southern California and a bachelor’s degree in international relations from Pomona College.Kruse will serve as a member of the board’s Compensation and Governance & Nominating committees.Additional information about Valvoline’s board of directors can be found at valvoline.com.last_img read more

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‘Difficult’ year ahead for ABS hopeful

first_imgOne of the UK’s leading legal expenses insurers has predicted a ‘difficult’ coming year despite an impending move into the legal profession. Abbey Protection today reported 2011 pre-tax profits of £10.1m – 5% up on the previous year. The company had expected by now to have obtained a licence to become an alternative business structure (ABS) and to have expanded its in-house service and bought an equity stake in a law firm. Chief executive Colin Davison admitted he was ‘disappointed’ to be one of dozens of companies still waiting on the Solicitors Regulation Authority to grant its licence. Chairman Tony Shearer said it will be important to take advantage of new opportunities when they come, as the outlook for Abbey’s small business customers was not improving. He said: ‘UK-based small businesses have faced pressures on their employment levels and taxable income for two consecutive years and we anticipate that these pressures will be present throughout 2012.’ The company increased total revenue from £34.9m in 2010 to £36.2m in 2011, during which time its share price rose by 10%. Meanwhile, the SRA today confirmed it is not yet ready to announce the first successful ABS application almost three months after the process opened.last_img read more

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The Friday Flyer – August 16th 2013

first_imgTax is never simple to understand, but Beijing seems to have made the subject of VAT on transportation even more difficult to grasp. Information regarding the imposition of Chinese VAT remains unclear. In China, a VAT charge has been imposed on domestic shipping, logistics and forwarding but there remains uncertainty as to how it might apply internationally, creating uncertainty for shipping managers, shipping lines, airlines and forwarders.It might seem a dry topic, but forwarders are crying foul with claims that airlines are introducing chargeable weight methodology on all surcharges. Airlines cite the costs relating to tightened security and fuel prices as being behind the switch from charging on actual weight to chargeable weight.Nurminen Logistics alerted HLPFI to some changes that are happening at the Russian border, which will impact on road services into and out of that country. The International Road Transport Union (IRU) has welcomed the postponement of a move by Russian Customs not to honour the TIR guarantee until mid-September. Despite the delay, the IRU has slammed what it still maintains is a “unilateral and illegitimate decision.” The Union considers that if Russia refuses to acknowledge the TIR guarantee, no one wins – the move will hurt the economies of all countries involved in international trade with Russia and the Russian economy itself.This week’s Friday Flyer is sponsored by Broekman Project Services, located in the Port of Rotterdam, which offers a total solution for handling and assembly of project cargoes – www.broekman-group.com/bpsIn the corporate worldSTX Pan Ocean reported a Q2 2013 net loss of USD24.7 million – down from USD84.3 million 12 months ago – on revenues of USD855.8 million in the quarter, down 32 percent on Q2 2012. A STX semi-submersible can be seen right.Imperial Logistics has entered into a joint venture with international advisory and procurement firm, The Beijing Axis to offer its clients an end-to-end supply chain solution between Asia and Africa.Entrec Corporation’s results for the three months ending June 30, 2013 (Q2 2013) saw revenue grow by 72 percent year-on-year to USD 47.77 million.Wilh. Wilhelmsen Holding’s results for Q2 2013, show operating profit for the quarter totalled USD106 million based on a total income of USD903 million, up 37 percent, while the revenue increased 4 percent.Kerry Logistics has acquired a majority stake in Mexico’s Cargo Master’s Group, whilst Rickmers-Linie has named Ben Line Agencies (HK) as its sales agent in Southern China. Last year, Rickmers-Linie transported three LPG storage tanks from Malaysia to Kuwait, pictured second right.According to maritime research agency Drewry, cargo no-shows and phantom bookings are a major headache for ocean carriers. With the peak season now well underway, cargo rollovers are more likely. Whilst freight booked from Asia to Europe was being rolled onto later vessels at the beginning of July, some ships still sailed under-capacity as a result of last minute booking cancellations.Royal Boskalis Westminster has issued its H1 2013 performance figures reporting a net profit of EUR123 million (USD164 million), up from EUR102 million (USD136.11 million) in H1 2012, with the results of the recently acquired Dockwise business being fully consolidated from the second quarter (pictured third right above).Capacity developmentsIn association with Kasgro Inc, Fracht USA has designed and built a new 16-axle, 11 m railcar, capable of carrying 400 tonne loads, for use in the North American market (pictured right).Modulift has designed and built its first-ever modular spreader frame, the CMOD, in response to customer demand and what Modulift calls a gap in the market for an adaptable spreader frame (pictured second right).PSC has unveiled its brand new self-propelled modular transporter (SPMT) 600 trailer (pictured third right) that can carry 67.5 tonnes, aimed at heavy transport requirements inside nuclear facilities.Liebherr is to supply six heavy lift vessel cranes to China for ships being built for Rickmers-Linie. Four of the cranes have a capacity of 450 tonnes, while two have a capacity of 120 tonnes each (pictured bottom right).Wallenius Wilhelmsen Logistics is set to offer two or three sailings per month from Veracruz, Mexico to the US East Coast, before voyaging to Western Europe, calling at  Veracruz, Galveston, Brunswick, Charleston and Baltimore; then proceeding to Europe calling at Antwerp, Bremerhaven and Southampton.Kawasaki Kisen Kaisha Ltd (K Line) is to launch a new business unit focused exclusively on the sales and marketing of ro-ro cargoes, targeted at construction machinery, agricultural equipment, static cargoes, as well as used automobiles and construction gear.NEAS has taken delivery of its newest multipurpose vessel, Mitiq. The 137 m vessel was built in 1995 and is ice class 1 certified and has three onboard 60-tonne lifting capacity cranes.Network newsXLProjects (XLP) has named Fiza Logistics Pvt Ltd as its new representative in Pakistan and Afghanistan. XLProjects (XLP) has also added Columbia Pro-rail Transport Services Limited (CPTS) as a representative in the cities of Qingdao and Tianjin, China.Project Cargo Network (PCN) has added Westlink Logistics as a new member, representing Australia.Reshamsingh & Co has become the exclusive member for the Cargo Equipment Experts (CEE) network in New Delhi, India in the heavy haulage, cranes and barge categories.The Air and Ocean Partners (AOP) network has welcomed Alpha Maritime Services, Genoa, Italy as a new member.People and placesEric Thompson has become vp transportation engineering, rail and heavy haul department at Fracht USA.Kaj Lindvig (pictured top right), senior advisor at A2SEA, has hit the road after his resignation, though he will remain on the books as a consultant.US congresswoman Betty Sutton (pictured second right) has been sworn in as the tenth administrator of the US Department of Transportation’s Saint Lawrence Seaway Development Corporation (SLSDC).UTi Worldwide has opened its new London facility in Heathrow, UK, to act as the company’s main air and road base in the UK.C.H. Robinson has appointed Ivo Aris as director of European global forwarding tasked with setting and executing the company’s European global forwarding strategy.DB Schenker Logistics has opened its brand new EUR13 million (USD17.35 million) logistics centre in Zwevegem, Belgium.All about EvieEvie applauds the charitable efforts of USA headquartered Ceres Barge Line. The company has recently taken delivery of a ‘hot pink’ barge named Big Hope 1 and will contribute a percentage of the vessel’s net earnings for a minimum of five years to Mary Crowley Cancer Research in Dallas.Of late, Evie has taken to starting her working week by checking out the latest opinions of XLProjects founder, Gary Dale Cearley, who is now posting thought-provoking articles on the project forwarder network’s website every Monday.David Cheslin – R.I.P.A memorial service for freight PR man, David Cheslin, who passed away recently has been organised. It will take place on Friday September 27 at 2pm at St Mary Abchurch, Abchurch Lane, London EC4. At David’s request, this will not be a religious service but the venue is a consecrated Church so there is the option for private prayer if you wish.last_img read more

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SCA extends Rotterdam terminal

first_imgWith an extra 208 m of quay length, the extension will lie adjacent to SCA’s existing terminal at the port.As well as the yard expansion, SCA and the Port of Rotterdam reached an agreement on a renewed contract, which extends it until 2050.The extension will provide SCA with a 23 ha terminal with a 720 m long quay and a 160 m ro-ro berth. The terminal also has 75,000 sq m of warehouse space, with the oppritnity for both breakbulk and container handling.  www.sca.comwww.portofrotterdam.comlast_img read more

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Seville prepares for more project cargo

first_imgThe port will invest in a 17,000 sq m area in the port that will be able to accommodate project loads. Rafael Carmona, president of the Port Authority of Seville (APS), said the investments would reinforce the port’s role as a strategic location in Andalusia for industrial logistics.The berth of the dock will be expanded in a second-phase development, said the port.Meanwhile, the Guadalquivir digitalisation project is progressing. Speaking at the port’s logistics conference on October 3, Ángel Pulido, director of APS, said that the project, which involves the installation of sensors along the estuary, is expected to be operational in the first half of next year.This technology will be able to offer precise information about the position of the ship and its surroundings, said the port.During the event, Carmona added: “We have a large area, not only to coordinate loading and unloading operations, but also for the implementation of manufacturing centres that reduce logistics costs due to the proximity to the pier.“We have logistics operators that offer customised services from door to door, from the production centre to its final destination,” he added.According to Carmona, the port has handled ABB transformers, wind turbine towers for large wind farms, components for a bridge project in Canada, and beer tanks for a Heineken factory, among other heavy and oversized loads.portal.apsevilla.comlast_img read more

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