South Africa returns fall in 2006

first_imgWould you like to read more?Register for free to finish this article.Sign up now for the following benefits:Four FREE articles of your choice per monthBreaking news, comment and analysis from industry experts as it happensChoose from our portfolio of email newsletters To access this article REGISTER NOWWould you like print copies, app and digital replica access too? SUBSCRIBE for as little as £5 per week.last_img

Learn more →

Plans to move nightclub to world’s tallest building

first_imgTo access this article REGISTER NOWWould you like print copies, app and digital replica access too? SUBSCRIBE for as little as £5 per week. Would you like to read more?Register for free to finish this article.Sign up now for the following benefits:Four FREE articles of your choice per monthBreaking news, comment and analysis from industry experts as it happensChoose from our portfolio of email newsletterslast_img

Learn more →

Nevsky Capital

first_imgWould you like to read more?Register for free to finish this article.Sign up now for the following benefits:Four FREE articles of your choice per monthBreaking news, comment and analysis from industry experts as it happensChoose from our portfolio of email newsletters To access this article REGISTER NOWWould you like print copies, app and digital replica access too? SUBSCRIBE for as little as £5 per week.last_img

Learn more →

Union Engineering to open Singapore service centre

first_imgSubscribe Get instant access to must-read content today!To access hundreds of features, subscribe today! At a time when the world is forced to go digital more than ever before just to stay connected, discover the in-depth content our subscribers receive every month by subscribing to gasworld.Don’t just stay connected, stay at the forefront – join gasworld and become a subscriber to access all of our must-read content online from just $270.last_img

Learn more →

Would a US-EU trade deal be good for lawyers?

first_imgI have written before about how the current economic crisis is leading to a radical rethinking of structures that impact on lawyers. Here is another initiative which could lead to significant consequences in years to come. There are some who believe that one way out of the impasse facing the euro and the dollar is for the two economies, EU and US, to co-operate more closely. The suggestion is that a reduction of barriers in services, among other things, would lead to a growth in trade and jobs. There are very interesting statistics, running into the trillions, of how dependent the two large economies have become. We are each other’s largest trading partners in services. At the EU-US summit in Washington (28 November) ‘opportunities to grow trade and jobs’ are on the agenda. The US Chamber of Commerce has written to the White House in the run-up to the summit to suggest that, rather than have a large EU-US bilateral trade agreement where disagreement on one item can hold up the whole package, there should be smaller single deals running in parallel, including one on liberalising cross-border trade in services. I am concerned here only with how this might affect lawyers. You might think that there is not much more liberalising that can be done that could affect lawyers between the US and EU. But you would be wrong. Our mutual wishes regarding liberalisation more or less mirror each other. We want to be able to practise wherever we wish in the US, and not just in those states which are currently relatively open such as New York or California. Similarly, they want to practise not just in London, Brussels or Paris, say, but in any member state of the EU (and each member state has different restrictions on practice by foreign lawyers). We want an easier route to qualification as a US attorney, taking into consideration our existing status as a European lawyer – and they would like that in the EU, I have no doubt. The one thing that they have included on past wish-lists is to take advantage of our EU directives on the free movement of lawyers, from which they are currently excluded (since they are not EU lawyers) … and from which we would like them to remain excluded. But will this be up for grabs in any new liberalisation negotiation? There is now a discussion in Brussels about the wisdom of proceeding down the single issue route. There are some large questions at stake. For instance, what impact will such a deal have on other free trade agreements, and on the multilateral system? Most of the service sectors already have open market access to the US, and so what would be the added value of this new proposal? And, maybe most significantly from the lawyers’ point of view, the majority of the remaining difficulties for service sectors in doing business in the US are of a regulatory nature, principally due to the federal structure, and the fact that many service sectors – including lawyers, who are regulated by the state supreme courts – are regulated at sub-federal level: how could such an agreement deliver removal or reduction of these state-level obstacles? The latter is a particularly big hurdle for EU lawyers, since the US doctrine of states’ rights has always meant that it is almost impossible for there to be a consistent US-wide agreement on regulation of foreign lawyers. Of course, I suspect that as usual we will have no control over our fate, which will be decided – like nearly everything nowadays – by economic forces well beyond us. But the CCBE is beginning to discuss its position on these matters. Finally, as a bonus for those who have read so far, I will provide a rare and useful guide, in a few sentences, as to where the main sources of essential information on international trade in legal services can be found. The prime document is a World Trade Organisation note from 2010 on legal services, with fascinating insights. US statistics and other related material on legal services can be found here. Australian statistics and other material can be found here. EU statistics on the movement of European lawyers across borders can be found here. What more do you need by way of Christmas holiday reading? Jonathan Goldsmith is secretary general of the Council of Bars and Law Societies of Europe, which represents about one million European lawyers through its member bars and law societies. He blogs weekly for the Gazette on European affairslast_img read more

Learn more →

Blowing in the wind

first_imgTo continue enjoying Building.co.uk, sign up for free guest accessExisting subscriber? LOGIN Get your free guest access  SIGN UP TODAY Subscribe now for unlimited access Subscribe to Building today and you will benefit from:Unlimited access to all stories including expert analysis and comment from industry leadersOur league tables, cost models and economics dataOur online archive of over 10,000 articlesBuilding magazine digital editionsBuilding magazine print editionsPrinted/digital supplementsSubscribe now for unlimited access.View our subscription options and join our community Stay at the forefront of thought leadership with news and analysis from award-winning journalists. Enjoy company features, CEO interviews, architectural reviews, technical project know-how and the latest innovations.Limited access to building.co.ukBreaking industry news as it happensBreaking, daily and weekly e-newsletterslast_img read more

Learn more →

Gaming can inspire construction’s next generation

first_imgTo continue enjoying Building.co.uk, sign up for free guest accessExisting subscriber? LOGIN Subscribe now for unlimited access Stay at the forefront of thought leadership with news and analysis from award-winning journalists. Enjoy company features, CEO interviews, architectural reviews, technical project know-how and the latest innovations.Limited access to building.co.ukBreaking industry news as it happensBreaking, daily and weekly e-newsletters Get your free guest access  SIGN UP TODAY Subscribe to Building today and you will benefit from:Unlimited access to all stories including expert analysis and comment from industry leadersOur league tables, cost models and economics dataOur online archive of over 10,000 articlesBuilding magazine digital editionsBuilding magazine print editionsPrinted/digital supplementsSubscribe now for unlimited access.View our subscription options and join our communitylast_img read more

Learn more →

SBB adds cross-border capacity

first_imgAnnouncing details at an event held in Zürich Hauptbahnhof on November 23, SBB said that demand for travel on services originating or terminating in Switzerland during the first nine months of the year was up by 10%.SBB took the opportunity to showcase some of the rolling stock that will be introduced on international services with the timetable change.On display were one of DB’s ICE4 trainsets, a double-deck TGV for TGV Lyria services, and a Giruno trainset destined for services from Zürich to Milano — although until ‘spring 2020’ Girunos will only operate between Zürich and Lugano or Chiasso. SBB says that, once the Ceneri base tunnel is open in 2021, it will offer trains to Venezia and ‘other destinations in Italy’.ICE4 trainsets, each with 830 seats, will operate seven services a day each way to and from Frankfurt and Hamburg. SBB says that this represents a 20% increase in capacity compared with the use of ICE1 trainsets.#*#*Show Fullscreen*#*# SWITZERLAND: Swiss Federal Railways will offer a major increase in capacity on international inter-city routes with effect from the timetable change on December 15.#*#*Show Fullscreen*#*# #*#*Show Fullscreen*#*# All TGV Lyria services will be operated by a fleet of 15 refurbished double-deck TGVs, with the number of seats available increased from 4 500 to 18 000 a day. There will be six return workings between Zürich and Paris, six between Lausanne and Paris, some of which will run via Genève, and eight a day between Genève and Paris.Future plans for stepping up frequencies on international routes include six instead of three return trips from Zürich to München from 2021, with the journey time cut from about 4 h 45 min to 3 h 30 min.#*#*Show Fullscreen*#*# SBB also announced that it is updating its on-line ticketing for international journeys with a view to simplifying ticket purchase and providing more tickets at lower prices to compete more effectively with airlines and road transport.last_img read more

Learn more →

Thousands march in Mauritius to protest disastrous oil spill

first_imgMauritius arrests captain of Japanese ship that caused oil spill Talk Africa: Mauritius oil spill FILE — In this Sunday, Aug. 16 file photo the Japanese MV Wakashio, a bulk carrier ship that recently ran aground off the southeast coast of Mauritius, can be seen from the coast of Mauritius. The oil spill disaster turned deadly this week when a tugboat leaving the shipwreck collided with a barge and sank, killing at least three sailors, police said Tuesday Sept. 1, 2020. (AP Photo/ Sumeet Mudhoo-L’express Maurice/File) FILE — In this Sunday, Aug. 16 file photo the Japanese MV Wakashio, a bulk carrier ship that recently ran aground off the southeast coast of Mauritius, can be seen from the coast of Mauritius. (AP Photo/ Sumeet Mudhoo-L’express Maurice/File)Thousands of people protested in Mauritius again Saturday over the government’s handling of an offshore oil spill that has become the Indian Ocean island nation’s worst environmental disaster in years.New details indicate the Japanese ship that struck a coral reef in late July and leaked some 1,000 tons of fuel oil near protected coastal areas, had strayed miles off course because the captain wanted to move closer to shore so crew members could get a mobile phone signal to call their families.“The change, of course, could be related to the birthday celebration of one of the crew members,” said a report this week by the maritime authority of Panama, where the MV Wakashio is registered.It said preliminary investigations also suggested that a navigation system and a nautical chart were mishandled.Last month, nearly one-tenth of the population of Mauritius marched peacefully in the capital, Port Louis, expressing outrage over the disaster and the discovery of dozens of dead dolphins weeks after the spill.It is not immediately clear what killed the dolphins, but some experts say water-soluble chemicals in the fuel might have been to blame. The government has called it a “sad coincidence.”Protesters have called for top officials to step down. Saturday’s march took place in Mahebourg, one of the most affected coastal villages.The island nation of 1.3 million people relies heavily on tourism and already had taken a severe hit due to travel restrictions during the coronavirus pandemic.On Friday, the Japanese operator of the bulk carrier said it will provide 1 billion yen ($9 million) to fund environmental projects and support the local fishing community.Mitsui O.S.K. Lines said the Mauritius Natural Environment Recovery Fund will be used for mangrove protection, coral reef recovery, protection of seabirds and rare species, and research by private and governmental groups.The shipowner, Nagashiki Shipping, is also joining the fund, MOL said.Mauritius has said it is seeking compensation for the damage from Nagashiki.Relatedcenter_img Mauritius starts to scuttle Japanese oil-spill vessellast_img read more

Learn more →

Easter Childcare For Key Workers

first_imgLearning and childcare hubs for the children of key workers will remain open across Scotland over the Easter holidays.The move will help support key workers in the NHS and other key sectors on the frontline of the response to coronavirus (COVID-19).All of Scotland’s local authorities will keep learning and childcare hubs open in their areas to support children and young people. The number of hubs that are open, and the types of support they provide, will vary between each council area in response to local demand.Education Secretary John Swinney said:“I am very grateful to colleagues in education and childcare who are working so hard to deliver this service.“Clearly these are unprecedented times and this will be a very different Easter holiday period for teachers and pupils across the country. I would like to thank all of those who have volunteered to provide support over this time.“Our key workers are on the frontline of the response to coronavirus and it’s only right that we do everything we possibly can to support them.“By keeping learning and childcare hubs open in our local authorities, we can make sure children are safe and well looked-after while their parents are doing critical jobs helping our communities.”BackgroundGuidance on key workersKey workers whose children already attend learning and childcare hubs will be contacted by their local authority to explain the arrangements over the spring break.Local authority websites are being updated regularly with the latest information on the learning and childcare hubs and should be contacted directly for further information if necessary. AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to FacebookFacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterTwitterShare to LinkedInLinkedInLinkedInlast_img read more

Learn more →