Bowman bolstered by Johnson’s early support, now takes over as his successor

first_imgWhen Alex Bowman joined Hendrick Motorsports for the 2018 season, he played along with the mistaken impression that he was a promising Cup Series rookie — even though already he had two-plus years of experience in NASCAR’s top division. Bowman was in on the joke, if only because his actual rookie season was forgettable; he scratched the top 20 just once for heavy underdog BK Racing and finished 35th in the 2014 driver standings.Bowman was about as far away on the grid as he could be from Jimmie Johnson, who had just sealed the sixth of his seven championships the year before. But Johnson often made it a point to check in with the series’ newer faces during pre-race ceremonies, and his uplifting words helped sustain Bowman as he raced hard in relative obscurity.RELATED: Catch up on the latest Silly Season news“I was talking about the race that had taken place the week before at just how hard I saw him driving the car,” Johnson recalled. “He was totally sideways, I could see his left-front tire and how active he was behind the wheel, just trying to hang onto it and still going forward. I remember approaching him and being like, ‘Man, I can’t believe you held onto that car and were able to save it and drive it.’ He’s definitely grown up running on the dirt, and I could tell that day when I saw him wheeling the car.”Somewhat improbably, the two drivers became Hendrick Motorsports teammates four years later and Tuesday, Bowman was introduced as Johnson’s successor in the No. 48 Chevrolet. But their bonds developed into a friendship that was a source of motivation during Bowman’s times of career uncertainty.“He was the first guy to come up to me and be like, ‘Hey, man. You’re doing a really good job with what you have to work with,’ at a time when I was really unsure of my career and didn’t know how things were going to go, wasn’t really having a whole lot of fun,” Bowman says. “That encouragement kept me going for quite a while, so to be able to take over a car from him is really special.”Bowman said the two drivers chatted earlier this week to discuss the impending news and how his move to a new team and new sponsor might play out. “More than anything, I just wanted him to know that I’m here,” Johnson said, indicating he would remain close to the No. 48 team next year, even as he leaves full-time Cup Series competition after this season.Bowman will have some continuity as his pairing with crew chief Greg Ives will remain in place, but he’ll again be a new figure following in famous footsteps. Three years ago, Bowman replaced Dale Earnhardt Jr. in the Hendrick No. 88; next season, he’ll take the reins of the No. 48 Chevrolet that Johnson carried to Hall of Fame heights in his illustrious career.“To watch his growth over the last few years, to drive after Dale Jr. in the 88 car and the pressure that comes with that, I feel like that was a big hurdle to accomplish when he first started, and he checked that box very well and moved on,” Johnson said. “Then the performance started to come, and the next thing is, can you elevate the consistency and have that there week-in and week-out. Then can you win and continue to win consistently, and he just keeps climbing the ladder with all those things in mind and handling all of this very, very well and delivering great results on a consistent level.”Though 2021’s early story lines will likely focus on whether Bowman can add to the stellar history of the No. 48, Johnson insists he’s eager to see Bowman forge his own identity with the team — much as he has the last three seasons.It’s just the latest form of encouragement from one driver to another, tracing back to a shared pre-race moment from 2014.“As we all know, it’ll be a story for a while and then he’s going to make that car his, and he’ll have an opportunity to write his own story,” Johnson says. “So, I’m excited for him, and I can’t wait to see what that story is.”MORE: Jimmie Johnson’s career in photoslast_img read more

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Danny DeVito & Judd Hirsch Spread Sunshine, Joe Manganiello Yells ‘Stella’ & More Cross-Country Highlights

first_imgBroadway.com is taking this show on the road! We’re highlighting the best regional theater offerings from across the country, including a True Blood star’s stint as Stanley Kowalski, the long-awaited reunion of Danny DeVito and Judd Hirsch and a musical version of Romeo and Juliet set to the songs of the late Jeff Buckley. Read below for this week’s cross-country theater picks! LOS ANGELES, CAIt’s Always Sunny in Los AngelesFor the first time in 30 years, Taxi favorites Danny DeVito and Judd Hirsch are reuniting! The duo will star in the Center Theatre Group production of The Sunshine Boys, Neil Simon’s 1972 comedy about Willie Clark (DeVito) and Al Lewis (Hirsch), estranged vaudeville stars who have been invited to co-star in a comedy special. See the reunion, featuring The Hangover’s Justin Bartha as Willie’s nephew, at the Ahmanson Theatre beginning September 24. View Comments NEW HAVEN, CTJoe Manganiello Tackles Tennessee WilliamsYou’ve seen him play a werewolf with a heart of gold on True Blood and a stripper with a big, uh, you know, in Magic Mike—now see Joe Manganiello take the stage as Stanley Kowalski in the Yale Repertory Theatre production of A Streetcar Named Desire from September 20 through October 12 alongside Sarah Sokovic as Stella and Rene Augesen as Blanche. Catch the steamy new production at the University Theatre. SAN DIEGO, CARomeo and Juliet and JeffSay hello to The Last Goodbye, an exciting musical take on Romeo and Juliet set to the music of the late Jeff Buckley. Starring Broadway vet Jay Armstrong Johnson and Talisa Friedman, the production features direction by two-time Tony nominee Alex Timbers (Rocky) and choreography by Sonya Tayeh (So You Think You Can Dance). See the star-crossed lovers break into song from September 22 through November 3 at The Old Globe. Star Files RED BANK, NJJoel Grey Goes Back in TimeTony winner Joel Grey’s theater career began at age nine, when he starred in a 1941 Ohio production of On Borrowed Time. Now, the legendary actor and director is helming the show that gave him his start at the Two River Theater Company. Starring Oakes Fegley as Pud and Robert Hogan as Gramps, the play tells the story of a boy’s magical friendship with his grandfather. See Paul Osborn’s rarely performed work through October 13. GLOUCESTER, MAMiss Daisy Drives to New EnglandOscar nominee Lindsay Crouse is taking the ride of a lifetime in the Gloucester Stage Company production of Driving Miss Daisy, where she’ll strike up an unlikely friendship with stage and screen vet Johnny Lee Davenport (The Fugitive) as loyal chauffeur Hoke. Directed by Benny Sato Ambush, the touching production features Robert Pemberton as Daisy’s son Boolie. Alfred Uhry’s iconic 1987 drama, playing through September 22, is worth the trip! Danny DeVitolast_img read more

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Castleton poll shows strong support for wind power development

first_imgby Andrew Stein February 27, 2013 vtdigger.org The results of a February poll conducted by the Castleton Polling Institute show strong support for developing wind projects on Vermont ridgelines and subsidizing ‘ alternative energy.’The poll drew from 617 Vermonters across a range of ages and incomes. Of those individuals, 66 percent said they support ‘ building wind energy turbines along the state’ s ridgelines,’ while 19 percent oppose the practice and 14 percent are unsure.The poll found that 69 percent of participating Vermonters are in favor of ‘ the development of a wind farm’ in their community, compared with 19 percent who oppose the proposition and 12 percent who are unsure. Of those residents, 66 percent also said that Vermont’ s government ‘ should subsidize alternative energy,’ opposed to the 20 percent who are against the notion and 14 percent who are unsure.Wind development advocates ‘ like Paul Burns, director of the Vermont Public Interest Research Group ‘ praised the results.‘ Wind power in Vermont is clean, safe and abundant,’ Burns said in a public statement. ‘ It’ s no wonder that support for wind remains so strong, despite the extreme rhetoric from groups like Energize Vermont and Vermonters for a Clean Environment.’Lukas Snelling is the director of Energize Vermont, which opposes the ridgeline development of wind turbines in Vermont. The group organized a rally this autumn, where nearly 200 protesters came out against developing wind turbines on Vermont’ s ridgelines.Snelling interprets the results of the poll differently than Burns does, pointing to the dip in support for ridgeline development from a 2012 Castleton Poll, which was conducted with help from various media outlets across the state. The 2012 poll found that 69 percent of participants supported such development, compared to the 66 percent this year.‘ The latest numbers released today from the Castleton Polling Institute show support for ridgeline wind in Vermont continues to erode,’ Snelling said in a public statement. ‘ Activists and citizens questioning the development of Vermont’ s ridgelines for wind power attribute the continued erosion of support to a variety of factors, but one of the most likely is that more of Vermont towns are facing proposals from aggressive wind developers.’PHOTO: Searsburg wind turbineslast_img read more

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Bar investments continue to perform

first_img Bar investments continue to perform The Bar’s investment portfolio continues to perform well, and the Investment Committee is embarking on an exhaustive review to help maintain that result.Investment Committee Chair Ian Comisky reported to the Board of Governors last month that for the first 11 months of 2012 the Bar’s long-term portfolio rose by 6.5 percent.“We’re having a good year despite the uncertainty in the market,” he said. “The discipline and diversity of the investments have served us well.”Later in the meeting, the board got a striking example of how well those policies have worked. Audit Committee Chair Clay Schnitker, during his report, noted that Bar assets in the 2010-11 fiscal year rose by $7 million — almost entirely due to returns from investments.Since 1999, Comisky said, the Standard & Poor’s 500 stock index has risen at an average rate of 1.7 percent annually. The Bar’s investments during the same period have averaged 4.7 percent, he said.At the recommendation of its advisors, Comisky said the committee has slightly increased the Bar’s investments in commodities and international stocks. The panel also has begun a comprehensive review of investment policies, including a review of all the funds in which the Bar invests, which could lead to more changes, he said. Bar investments continue to perform January 1, 2013 Regular Newslast_img read more

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Midweek opponent allows Anderson to shuffle lineup

first_imgHowever, MacLean said he’s willing to “grind it out” the rest of the season.“Yesterday (Monday) was enough time off for me,” he said. “I don’t have anything after these four, five weeks (of school). It’s now or never.”MacLean has played in 35 of the 37 Gophers games this season, while Lyons is one of three players to have played in 36 of the games.“We’ll probably play a number of players,” Anderson said. “If those guys play I hope I can limit their play.”Because of the midweek game, junior pitcher Marcus McKenzie also will get a chance to impress the coaches – he’s getting his second start of the season tonight.“We were impressed with his ability to at least go out there and have some command,” Anderson said. “Maybe he’s going to be a factor here at the end of the year.”McKenzie said he’ll most likely pitch three or four innings.“I have a pitch count due to the fact that I got my first start the other day,” he said. “I threw about 40 pitches. So that will probably be around the same, maybe a little more.”After McKenzie pitches the Gophers most likely will mix and match out of the bullpen while doing the same to the batting order. But that’s customary for the Gophers in a midweek game.“There’s always one or two guys that aren’t normal weekend starters,” MacLeansaid. “I think it’s a good opportunity for the future of the program to get those guys some at-bats.” Midweek opponent allows Anderson to shuffle lineupMinnesota plays South Dakota State tonight at the Metrodome. Robert MewsApril 26, 2006Jump to CommentsShare on FacebookShare on TwitterShare via EmailPrintMinnesota baseball coach John Anderson isn’t afraid to change a lineup card in the middle of a Big Ten race.He’s also more willing to do the same for a nonconference opponent, such as South Dakota State (18-21), which the Gophers (20-17) face at 6:30 tonight at the Metrodome.Anderson said midweek games are an opportunity to re-evaluate his players and get some younger players some experience and rest some starters.“We’re here to try and develop our players and try to keep getting better,” he said. “And if you don’t try different combinations and take some risks once in a while, then how do you know?”What is known is that Anderson said he’d like to get Tony Lesemen over at third base.Joe Maciej is the only real option the team has at third since Nate Hanson went out with a wrist injury.“We really don’t have another player if we do pinch-hit for Joe or if he gets hurt,” Anderson said about the situation. “I’m hoping to get him over there on Wednesday.”Anderson has used a past midweek game to place outfielder Mike Mee at third, an experiment he has not tried since.“I’m not afraid to make some changes, and I’m not afraid to try different people,” he said.Anderson also said he’d like to get shortstop Dan Lyons and second baseman Luke MacLean some rest.“I’d like to give Luke MacLean a little break,” he said. “His arm is a little tired, so he could use a break.”last_img read more

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Cole Real Estate Investments, Inc. Common Stock Begins Trading on the NYSE

first_imgCole Real Estate Investments, Inc. (NYSE: COLE), a full-scale real estate and investment management firm, today announced that its common stock has begun trading on the New York Stock Exchange (NYSE) under the ticker symbol “COLE.”“Listing on the NYSE is a significant milestone for our firm, and I look forward to continuing to work with our talented team to capitalize on the significant opportunities this presents,” said Chris Cole, founder and executive chairman of Cole Real Estate Investments. “As a market-leading net-lease REIT, our high-quality portfolio and fully integrated real estate platform position us to be successful in today’s market. I am proud of the accomplishments that have led us to this most historic day in Cole’s 34-year history.”To commemorate the listing, executives and guests of Cole will visit the NYSE to ring the Opening Bell on Friday, June 21st at 9:30 a.m.Marc Nemer, chief executive officer of Cole Real Estate Investments, added, “It is an honor to be a NYSE-traded company, continuing our mission of being the premier, trusted brand in real estate. Stockholders will benefit from our proven investment strategy that has built one of the largest REITs focused on the net-lease sector. We are confident today’s listing provides the opportunity to build on that market leadership.”With Cole’s listing, investors can own an interest in Cole’s high-quality commercial real estate portfolio featuring a 12.4 year weighted average lease term, 99% portfolio occupancy and 55% investment grade tenancy. The $7.7 billion of gross assets is well diversified by industry, tenancy and geography. Industry-leading tenants in the net lease portfolio include Walgreens, CVS/pharmacy, Amazon.com, Walmart, Target, Costco, Home Depot, FedEx, PetSmart, AT&T, Kohl’s and Merrill Lynch. In addition to being one the largest REITs in the net lease sector, Cole’s private capital business, Cole Capital, provides additional income as a result of management fees earned from sponsored real estate vehicles.In addition, on June 17, 2013, Cole’s Board of Directors authorized the declaration and payment of a cash distribution on a monthly basis, in the amount of $0.05833334 per share of common stock (an annualized rate of $0.70 per share) for stockholders of record as of each of July 31, 2013, August 30, 2013, and September 30, 2013. Payment dates for each record date are August 1, 2013, September 3, 2013, and October 1, 2013, respectively.last_img read more

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DTZ completes lease for new restaurant on Mill

first_imgDTZ, a global leader in commercial real estate services, announced today that The Grill on Mill has leased 5,537 square feet at Hayden Station, 350 S. Mill Avenue in Tempe, AZ. The California-based operator plans to open the new restaurant mid-2015.DTZ Vice President Brent Mallonee represents the landlord, YAM Properties, in its retail lease negotiations. Courtney Auther Van Loo with Cushman & Wakefield represented the tenant in this transaction.The Hayden Station location is The Grill on Mill’s first Arizona restaurant. There are several related restaurants in California, including the original Firestone Grill in San Louis Obispo.The Grill on Mill is located on the ground floor of the project’s B building, with strong frontage on Mill Avenue. The landlord combined three ground floor spaces to create the new restaurant suite.Hayden Station is a ±106,834 square foot, mixed-use project located on the southwest corner of Mill Avenue and 3rd Street that features five buildings with office and retail space. It is directly across from the Metro Light Rail station and minutes from Arizona State University. DTZ has the leasing assignment for the office and retail space at Hayden Station.For more information on Hayden Station contact DTZ at 602.954.9000.last_img read more

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Psychologists pinpoint change in weight required to look healthier and more attractive

first_imgPinterest Share on Facebook Email Share LinkedIncenter_img A good poker face might prevent others knowing what cards you’re holding but it won’t prevent them from knowing if you’ve gained or lost weight. That’s because our faces reveal many things, including whether our weight has changed. Now, researchers in the Department of Psychology at the University of Toronto have determined the amount of weight people need to gain or lose before others notice or find them more attractive.“Women and men of average height need to gain or lose about three and a half and four kilograms, or about eight and nine pounds, respectively, for anyone to see it in their face,” said Nicholas Rule, associate professor and Canada Research Chair in Social Perception and Cognition at U of T, “but they need to lose about twice as much for anyone to find them more attractive.”Rule and postdoctoral fellow Daniel Re looked at facial adiposity — the perception of weight in the face — because it is an accurate indicator of a person’s body mass index (BMI), which is calculated as a person’s weight in kilograms divided by the square of the person’s height in metres (kg/m2). Share on Twitter “It is a robust indicator of one’s health,” said Rule. “Increased facial adiposity is associated with a compromised immune system, poor cardiovascular function, frequent respiratory infections, and mortality. So, even a small decrease can improve one’s health.”To determine at what point a change in the perception of facial adiposity occurs, Rule and Re digitally created a collection of photos of male and female faces between 20 and 40 years old. In all photos, subjects had neutral expressions, hair pulled back, and no facial adornments. They altered each image to produce sequences of images spanning a range of weights on a gradually increasing scale.Participants in the study were asked to compare randomly drawn pairs of faces from each sequence and choose the heavier-looking one. After several trials, the researchers determined a change in BMI of approximately 1.33 kg/m2 is required to make a difference noticeable.“We calculated the weight change thresholds in terms of BMI rather than simple kilograms or pounds, so that people of all weights and heights can apply it to themselves according to their individual stature,” said Re.The researchers also investigated the threshold at which changes in an individual’s facial adiposity resulted in a change in perceived attractiveness. Although beauty is to some extent in the eye of the beholder, a large body of research shows that there are some universal standards of beauty, and these tend to reflect whether or not someone looks healthy.Rule and Re found that the average decrease required to make the faces in the sample appear more attractive was 2.38 kg/m2 for women, and 2.59 kg/m2 for men, translating to about 6.3 and 8.2 kilograms (approximately 14 and 18 pounds) for women and men of average height, respectively.“The difference between the groups suggests women’s facial attractiveness may be more sensitive to changes in weight,” said Rule. “This just means women attempting to lose weight need to shed slightly fewer pounds than men for people to find them more attractive.”“When it comes to incentives for weight loss, some people are more motivated to look attractive than to improve their health,” said Re.The research is described in full in the study ‘Heavy Matters: The Relationship Between Just Noticeable Differences in Perceptions of Facial Adiposity and Facial Attractiveness‘, published in Social Psychological and Personality Science.last_img read more

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Study finds taller people tend to be more politically conservative

first_imgShare Email Pinterest LinkedIn If you want to predict which political party someone will support, take note of the person’s height.The taller a person is, the more likely he or she is to support conservative political positions, support a conservative party and actually vote for conservative politicians, according to a new study using data from Britain.“If you take two people with nearly identical characteristics – except one is taller than the other – on average the taller person will be more politically conservative,” said Sara Watson, co-author of the study and assistant professor of political science at The Ohio State University.center_img Share on Twitter Share on Facebook The researchers found that a one-inch increase in height increased support for the Conservative Party by 0.6 percent and the likelihood of voting for the party by 0.5 percent.The results aren’t as strange as they might appear, Watson said. Many studies have found that taller people generally earn more income than do shorter people and researchers have thought income could be linked to voting.Watson said they conducted this study because, while political scientists have long theorized about an income-voting relationship, studies using real-world data have shown mixed results. Some researchers find a link, while others see little or no effect.“We were thinking about why there were so many seemingly contradictory findings. One reason might be that income fluctuates from year to year, so that a relationship between your overall economic well-being and your political beliefs can be hard to uncover,” she said.“That’s why we decided to see if height might be a good way to assess the link between income and voting.”Researchers in anthropology and economics have long used height as a measure of economic well-being, especially among historical populations for which we have little or no income data.Watson added that a number of recent studies have extended this work and have found that across modern labor markets, taller people get paid more.“I’ve always been struck by this research because I am 5 feet tall and I’m typically the shortest person in the room,” she said with a laugh. “It seemed unfair that shorter people seem to pay a penalty in the labor market.”Watson conducted the study with Raj Arunachalam, senior economist at Bates White, LLC. Their article is published online in the British Journal of Political Science.The researchers used data from the 2006 British Household Panel Study, a survey which includes self-reported height, detailed income data and a number of questions about political beliefs for just over 9,700 adults.They found that taller people were not only more likely to support the Conservative Party and vote for Conservative candidates, but also were more likely to support conservative positions. For example, taller people are less likely to support the statement that major public services and industries ought to be in state ownership, or that the government ought to place an upper limit on earnings.The findings stood up even after the researchers performed more detailed analyses to investigate whether the effect of height on political beliefs could be explained through other channels, including race, years of schooling, marital status and religion.“It was important to us to figure out if the effect of height on voting could be explained by factors that have nothing to do with income,” Watson said.The researchers also took into account potential explanations such as such as cognition and utilization of public health care. But no matter what they controlled for, the link between height and voting remained.“It was a robust finding,” Watson said.The authors discovered that the link between height and political views occurred in both men and women, but was roughly twice as strong for men. For men, each additional inch of height generates a 0.8 percent increase in the likelihood of Conservative support, whereas for women the effect is 0.4 percent. However, Watson cautioned that results on gender differences were not statistically significant.Because the data used by the researchers follows households over time, they were able to examine whether the effect of a person’s height varied depending on the year in question.“There was some year-to-year variation, but the effect never disappeared,” said Watson.In a second part of the study, the researchers used height in what is called an “instrumental variable” strategy, to assess the relationship between income and voting.“Height is useful in this context because it predicts income well,” Watson explained. “Because we only expect height to affect political behavior through income, we can use it to investigate the effect of income on voting.”The authors found that each additional inch in height was associated with about 350 pounds of income (approximately $665 at the time of the survey), and that a ten percent increase in income increased the likelihood of voting Conservative by about 5.5 percent.Watson said it was beyond the scope of this study to examine why height is related to income. Some researchers have pointed to discrimination in favor of tall people, while others emphasize self-confidence or cognitive advantages.Watson emphasized that a lot of factors affect a person’s political views and not just income – or height.“Income and height play a role, but they are not political destiny,” she said.last_img read more

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Topper Girls Basketball Picks Up Big Win Over Demons

first_imgNatalie Gallegos tries to get a shot in the second quarter as Maci Cordova is all over her. Gallegos was the leading scorer for the Toppers with 27 points for the night. Photo by John McHale/ladailypost.comTopper Jenae Montoya, Michaela Gonzales and Anna Abeyta try to block a shot by Gabby Malczeski in the third quarter. Photo by John McHale/aldailypost.com Natalie Gallegos brings the ball down court through traffic in a game played Friday night against the Santa Fe Demons in the 2019 Lady Horseman Christmas Tournament at St. Michael’s gymnasium. The two-day tournament hosted eight teams from around the area. The Toppers lost their first game to Pecos 39-52, which placed them in the consolation side of the bracket. The second game was played against the Santa Fe High School Demons, which was a big win, 54-50.  This was the highest number of points scored by the Toppers this season. The game was close throughout with both teams playing a hard and aggressive game. The Toppers played the Taos Tigers in the final game for fifth place and won 34-25. Photo by John McHale/ladailypost.com Topper Hannah Sanchez goes in for a shot in the first quarter and is closely guarded by Ari Hernandez. Photo by John McHale/ladailypost.comLoose ball near the Topper basket as Angie Malczeski, left, Hannah Sanchez, center, and Anna Abeyta, right, all reach to grab the ball but Abeyta ended up with it. Photo by John McHale/ladailypost.comcenter_img Jenae Montoya looks for a teammate to pass the ball to as Maci Cordova covers her in the second quarter. Photo by John McHale/ladailypost.comlast_img read more

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