Guy Runs Marathon With a New Heart, Young Organ Donor’s Dad Shows Up to Cheer Him On

first_imgAddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to FacebookFacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailEmailShare to RedditRedditRedditShare to MoreAddThisMoreIt has been two years since John Dickhout endured a massive heart attack that left him in dire need of a new organ. At the same time, 22-year-old Adam Prashaw passed away following a severe seizure and Dickhout received his heart.Thanks to a successful operation and recovery, John was able to run his first marathon since the surgery – and Adam’s father, Rick, showed up to cheer him on.MORE: Stranger Sets Off Incredible Chain of Good Deeds That Saved 6 LivesWhen John crossed the finish line, Prashaw Sr. was there to greet him with a hug, clapping and cheering for the accomplishment of the man who was thriving with his son’s heart.“It was just like watching my kid in a hockey game,” Prashaw told CTV News. “Seeing [John] just living and choosing life … all because of Adam’s gift means the world to us.”(WATCH the video below)Click To Share The Heartwarming Story With Your Friends – Photo by CTV NewsAddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to FacebookFacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailEmailShare to RedditRedditRedditShare to MoreAddThisMorelast_img read more

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Philosophy club approved for new school year

first_imgMembers of the Undergraduate Philosophy Club, new this semester, will have a venue to engage outside the classroom with the work of Albert Camus, Friedrich Nietzsche and other philosophy experts. Senior Katie Finley, club president, said before the Student Activities Office (SAO) approved the club in the spring, Notre Dame’s strong philosophy department lacked a corresponding student organization. “Looking at other schools that have reputable philosophy programs like Notre Dame, all the rest had undergraduate philosophy clubs,” Finley said. “Notre Dame was the only one of its caliber that didn’t have a philosophy club.” Junior and club treasurer Cameron Cortens said the organization allows philosophy majors to sharpen skills that apply to their academic goals and enables non-philosophy majors to pursue questions they do not encounter in class. “Philosophy Club’s main purpose is to provide an informal atmosphere outside of classrooms and grades for Notre Dame students with an interest in philosophy to come together, share ideas, challenge themselves and one another intellectually on their positions and worldviews, and hopefully arrive at some fruitful discoveries in the realm of truth,” Cortens said. The club consists of students studying philosophy as well as students studying other disciplines, according to Finley. “We have a lot of people who aren’t philosophy majors,” Finley said. “It’s just kind of a good way to get an opportunity to talk, especially because they don’t get that opportunity in their classes a lot of time.” Finley said the club would meet once a week to discuss various philosophical writings. “We’re going to send out a short article ahead of time that isn’t too dry and academic, and then we’re going to discuss it,” Finley said. Finley said she plans to host monthly movie events at which attendees can watch a relevant film and discuss the philosophical ideas it raises. Cortens said the Undergraduate Philosophy Club will screen “Fight Club” in September, but the exact date has not yet been determined. The club will also have dining hall dinners with philosophy graduate students and professors to learn about their research, Finley said. She also said she hopes to organize a spring conference at which a University professor or an outside speaker will address club members. Last year, Finley said the club met as an unofficial group with between 10 and 15 members at each gathering. “We’re hoping to get a lot more members now that we can advertise because we’re official,” Finley said. The club plans to integrate philosophy lovers of all levels of study, Finley said. “[We hope] to make more of a connection between undergraduate students and graduate students and faculty members, especially for undergraduates that are hoping to go into graduate school for philosophy,” Finley said. “[Another goal is] also to get more people interested in majoring in philosophy, just to show them what studying philosophy is actually like outside the freshmen intro classes.” Senior Dylan Belton, club vice president, said the club would have fun events in addition to the more serious ones so that members can get to know each other. “Philosophical discussions become more and more fruitful as the partakers grow in friendship and mutual respect for others involved in the discussion,” Belton said. Senior Chelsea King, club vice president, emphasized the impact the club has already had on her experience at Notre Dame. “As a transfer student, it has really proved to be a great place for me to meet many incredible individuals who all share a common passion in discussing very deep and profound questions about life,” she said. “I have made many friends since my time in the club.”last_img read more

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UK RIDE24 Team Road Race Relay Puts You on Top Gear Test Track

first_imgWanna ride your road bike for 24 hours on an airfield test track?  Here’s your chance: The 2010 RIDE24 endurance relay has just opened registration.  The event started this year and drew 25 teams, mostly from corporate firms, so get your shop team out there for 2010 and hammer those blue chippers.Entry fee is £240 and includes food and drink, free massages, music and entertainment, a T-shirt and a medal (everyone’s a weiner!) and the opportunity to ride the 4.5km Top Gear test track on your bike.  Register before the end of November and it’s half off.  Proceeds benefit Action Medical Research, a children’s health charity.  The event is scheduled for June 19-20 at Dunsfold Aerodrome.last_img read more

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Color Yourself Happy

first_imgAARP Magazine:Having the freedom to change careers or pursue our passions makes us happier than does a hefty bank account, reports the American Psychological Association, which recently published an analysis of multiple studies. Researchers from Victoria University of Wellington in New Zealand analyzed questionnaires from 420,000 people in 63 countries and found that individuals able to make their own choices —to start a small business, for instance —claimed the highest levels of well-being.Read the whole story: AARP Magazine More of our Members in the Media >last_img read more

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Childhood adversity linked to reduced inhibitory control and alterations in key brain networks

first_imgPinterest Share on Twitter Share on Facebook LinkedIn New research suggests that exposure to childhood adversity is associated with reduced cognitive control and alterations in key brain networks. The findings, which appear in the journal Social Cognitive and Affective Neuroscience, could help explain the link between childhood adversity and depression.“My work focuses on how we can use objective biomarkers to aid in clinical decision making,” said study author Scott A. Langenecker of the University of Utah. “One challenging clinical decision point is what to do when individuals have recovered from a depressive episode. Do we continue treatment? Do we exercise regular check-ins? Or do we just wait and see?” center_img Email Share “As depressive episodes can sneak up on people and as they may interfere with help-seeking, it may be better to have objective tools to predict risk for recurrence of depression, so that we can provide a higher level of follow-up care and preventative treatments (or maintenance therapy) for these individuals. As about half of those with remitted depression will have recurrence in a year or two, this could be a very useful clinical decision tool,” Langenecker explained.The researchers were particularly interested in a component of cognitive control known as inhibitory control — meaning the ability to stop a hasty reflexive response. “Cognitive control impairment is associated with depression and has been observed in the remitted phase of illness,” the researchers wrote.In the study, 53 individuals with remitted major depressive disorder and 40 healthy controls completed a Go/No-Go task measuring inhibitory control. The participants also completed a survey on childhood adversity and current life stress, and underwent a fMRI scanning session to assess gray matter volume and resting state connectivity in the brain.The researchers found that participants who reported higher level of childhood adversity tended to exhibit poorer inhibitory control. This was true in both groups even after controlling for depression symptoms and current stressors.Langenecker and his colleagues also found that childhood adversity was associated with alterations in three important brain networks: the cognitive control network, the salience and emotion network, and the default mode network.“We know that depression is different for each person, and for some it is a recurrent, chronic illness somewhat like diabetes. We should be asking critical questions of our health care systems, insurance companies and providers about how we can better maintain wellness and prevent recurrence,” Langenecker told PsyPost. “Treatment can be preventative and does not need to be reactive. Higher levels of care and proactive prevention can reduce bad outcomes (like relationship problems and divorce, education difficulties, low work productivity and quality (presenteeism), and risk for suicide).”The study — like all research — has some limitations.“The main caveat is that the study has not yet been replicated, and in a larger sample. Many interesting leads like this do not replicate because of subtle differences in the samples used and analysis techniques,” Langenecker explained.“I’d like to encourage individuals who struggle with depression to demand better preventative treatment options and better insurance coverage for these types of biometric tools,” he added. “Ask your care provider what steps they take for evidence-based practice. Ask them to use objective measures of treatment change and empirically based treatments.”The study, “Cognitive control and network disruption in remitted depression: a correlate of childhood adversity“, was authored by Meghan E. Quinn, Jonathan P. Stange, Lisanne M. Jenkins, Samantha Corwin, Sophie R. DelDonno, Katie L. Bessette, Robert C. Welsh, and Scott A. Langenecker.last_img read more

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‘Murder, She Danced’ At Smith Auditorium Oct. 6

first_imgA detective from the ‘Murder, She Danced’ performance set for 4 p.m. Sunday Oct. 6 at Duane Smith Auditorium. Courtesy/YMCAScene from a previous performance by Dance of India students. Courtesy/YMCA The Family YMCA’s Dance of India performance of ‘Murder, She Danced’ is 4 p.m. Sunday Oct. 6 at Duane Smith Auditorium. Courtesy/YMCA By DIANA MARTINEZThe Family YMCAA student’s suggestion that this 13th year’s performance of The Family YMCA’s Dance of India classes center on something other than a universally known theme, got the instructor to thinking.What should pop into the mind of instructor Alina Deshpande but a a ghost-murder mystery where the ghost makes its presence known through the tinkering of bells. It is a fitting theme for the month of October. The performance is 4 p.m. Sunday, Oct. 6, at the Duane Smith Auditorium.“Nileena gets the credit for coming up with the title of our production,” Deshpande said.Deshpande is the Group Leader of the Biosecurity and Public Health Group in the Bioscience Division at Los Alamos National Laboratory. She began teaching Kathak at the Y in 2003 when her daughter was 6 years old because she wanted to share her culture with her.“She was one of my first students along with three other little girls who were around 4 at the time. They danced with me until they left to go to undergradate school in California, Texas and even Ireland!” Deshpande said. “I was encouraged by my friends to start this class so that other members in the Indian community in Los Alamos could get exposed. I have been continuously delighted and gratified to have diverse members of the Los Alamos community join the class, as it is not restricted to student with Indian origins. This goes to show how welcoming and open our Los Alamosites are!”Deshpande said her class has students that range in age from 5-70.“I have students who have Indian roots as well as those who want to learn a new culture,” she said. “I guess the students love the preparation for these annual shows as well as other performances that we do throughout the year. They enjoy dressing up, too.” Each year Despande supports a charity located in another part of the world.“We started with supporting primarily charities in India, but over the years, it became clear that there are needs all over the world, so it was just something that I realized – why are we restricting ourselves to just one country when we could help so many more,” she said, adding that dollars go much further in other parts of the world and have a very large impact.The one-day performance of “Murder, She Danced!” is supported by parent volunteers who help with stage management.“Mary Beth Stevens, Gauri Prasad and Chris Frankle are so helpful,” Despande said. “I really appreciate their willingness and commitment. I would also like to give a big shout out to my friend Dr. Madhavi Garimella, who in addition to helping with stage management, arranges the intermission sales of snacks and Indian jewelry and clothes, and handles other logistics.”“And I would like to acknowledge my good friend Nileena Velappan, who is also a senior student in class and keeps me energized and inspired! She will do it all from getting costumes for various students, finding sponsors, getting banner permits and being the publicity rep. These are the folks who we don’t all see on stage, but have a big hand in the success of the program. They do it all selflessly and with no expectation of credit or fanfare.”While there is no formal charge, donations are strongly encouraged to support charitable work. This year’s production benefits the YMCA Chiang Mai in Thailand and their Women’s Empowerment program. Suggested donations are $10 for ages 12 and older; $5 for children ages 5-11.Deshpande encourages everyone to come to this fun and colorful event with Indian dances woven into an interesting theme.“We have some serious local acting talent that will be showcased, so this should make for an entertaining evening!” Deshpande said.last_img read more

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Happy Birthday, John Daly

first_imgGolf fans celebrated the 54th birthday of John Daly, one of the most popular professional golfers of all time, on April 26. For most people, turning 54 isn’t a big deal, but many that know Daly would call it remarkable. He was only 25 years old when he won the PGA Championship in what could be referred to as the most unlikely win since Francis Ouimet won the 1913 U.S. Open Championship. By the way, the winning purse for Ouimet that year was $300. By comparison, in 2019, Gary Woodland banked a cool $2.25 million for his victory at Pebble Beach. Daly’s big break took place in 1991. He had only played in 23 PGA Tour events, had made just 12 cuts, and was the ninth alternate to get in the PGA Championship at Indiana’s Crooked Stick Golf Club. The eight other alternates on the list ahead of Daly weren’t available — it was already Wednesday of championship week. As soon as Daly got the call that he was in the field, he jumped in his car and was on his way. He arrived just hours before his first-round tee time. Luck continued to be on Daly’s side as Nick Price was the last player to withdraw as his wife was in the late stages of her pregnancy. Price knew his caddie, Jeff “Squeaky” Medlin, was available, so he offered Squeaky’s services to Daly. Of course, the caddie was happy to handle a bag for the championship. The rest is history. Long John Daly went on to win his first major championship and made a name for himself in the process with his prodigious length off the tee. Little known fact: Squeaky Medlin is the only caddie in history to win back-to-back PGA Championships with two different players. The following year, he was on the bag when Price won, in 1992. That achievement earned Medlin a spot in the Caddie Hall of Fame. As it turned out, Squeaky and I became good friends, and we shared some good times out on the Tour. I was heartbroken when he told me he had been diagnosed with leukemia. Medlin reached out to me during his final days. “Bob, you tell everyone I had a good run,” he told me. Jeff passed away the next day. He was 43. At the time, Daly’s 1991 PGA Championship win was considered by most to be a “fluke,” but he silenced all critics four years later by winning The Open Championship on the hallowed grounds of St. Andrews Links in a four-hole playoff with the Italian, Costantino Rocca. In his career, Daly won two major championships and three other PGA Tour events. He is now an active member of the PGA Tour Champions and has one over-50 victory to date. There’s no doubt Daly had an up-and-down personal life, but he is a good guy with a big heart. In fact, during that 1991 PGA Championship he won, a fan had been struck by lightning and unfortunately died. When Daly found out about it, he quickly wrote a check for $30,000, which he gave to the family. It’s been said Daly’s high-octane lifestyle is the main reason he was never chosen to be part of a Ryder Cup team. He is the only two-time American major winner never to wear the red, white, and blue. In fact, many felt that with the lifestyle Daly chose, he had a greater chance of shooting 54 for 18 holes than reaching 54 years old. Daly, who has been married five times, was the poster boy for the theme song “All my exes wear Rolexes.” In casino slang, Daly was known as a high-roller. During one PGA Tour event where he was a star attraction, a rain delay came into play, so we had some spare time. I was enjoying some blackjack at a nearby casino when Daly walked in and took a seat at a $25 slot machine. I watched in amazement as he started playing two $25-machines simultaneously, and didn’t stop for the next four hours. Daly has played in eight Masters Tournaments, with his best finish being a third-place tie in 1993. He played his last Masters in 2002, but remains on the scene each year not on the course, but in the Hooters parking lot. That’s where he parks his RV full of John Daly merchandise. He spends his Master’s week selling and signing hats, T-shirts, and other memorabilia for fans. The next time you hear on television that familiar introduction to the Masters: “It’s a tradition unlike any other,” just think for a moment that 54-year-old John Daly fits that mold exactly.bobvoiceofgolf@gmail.com Sharelast_img read more

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CryoVation welcomes industry veteran to team

first_imgGet instant access to must-read content today!To access hundreds of features, subscribe today! At a time when the world is forced to go digital more than ever before just to stay connected, discover the in-depth content our subscribers receive every month by subscribing to gasworld.Don’t just stay connected, stay at the forefront – join gasworld and become a subscriber to access all of our must-read content online from just $270. Subscribelast_img

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The iniquity of ‘one in, two out’

first_imgSubscribe now for unlimited access Stay at the forefront of thought leadership with news and analysis from award-winning journalists. Enjoy company features, CEO interviews, architectural reviews, technical project know-how and the latest innovations.Limited access to building.co.ukBreaking industry news as it happensBreaking, daily and weekly e-newsletters Subscribe to Building today and you will benefit from:Unlimited access to all stories including expert analysis and comment from industry leadersOur league tables, cost models and economics dataOur online archive of over 10,000 articlesBuilding magazine digital editionsBuilding magazine print editionsPrinted/digital supplementsSubscribe now for unlimited access.View our subscription options and join our community Get your free guest access  SIGN UP TODAY To continue enjoying Building.co.uk, sign up for free guest accessExisting subscriber? LOGINlast_img read more

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