On The Job In Los Alamos: Warner Waving At Motorists

first_imgOn the job in Los Alamos is Larry Warner, 87, spotted Tuesday morning on his ‘geriatric jog’ as he likes to refer to his daily two mile walk on North Mesa. A reader contacted the Los Alamos Daily Post about Warner and expressed gratitude for the fact that he smiles and waves at every car that passes by him during his walks. Photo by Jennifer Bartram/ladailypost.comlast_img

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People Moves: Capita Real Estate, Goodwin, Lodders and more

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Air Products employee honoured

first_imgGet instant access to must-read content today!To access hundreds of features, subscribe today! At a time when the world is forced to go digital more than ever before just to stay connected, discover the in-depth content our subscribers receive every month by subscribing to gasworld.Don’t just stay connected, stay at the forefront – join gasworld and become a subscriber to access all of our must-read content online from just $270. Subscribelast_img

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Norwegian Offshore Developments See $14.5 Bln Cost Drop

first_img“The oil companies and the supplier industry have made a tremendous effort in streamlining the activities, and now we can see that these measures are working.” The price tag for developing a field on the Norwegian shelf has declined by an average of more than 40 per cent since the autumn of 2014, according to theNorwegian Petroleum Directorate’s (NPD’s) analysis of eight planned developments that are approaching start-up.The decline is a result of a combination of simpler development concepts and more efficient drilling. Lower prices for work and equipment are also a contributing factor.The investment estimates for the Utgard, Oda, Zidane, Trestakk, Snilehorn, Johan Castberg, Snorre Expansion and Johan Sverdrup Phase 2 projects have fallen from about NOK 270 ($32.5 billion) to 150 billion (approx. $18 billion), according to the operating companies’ own calculations. The downward adjustments have been made in connection with various decision phases in project implementation.“This is a significant and very welcome reduction”, says the NPD’s director of development and operations, Ingrid Sølvberg. The biggest savings on these eight projects are a result of altered development solutions. The second largest reduction is within drilling and wells, which on average accounts for around 30 per cent of the overall field development costs. This is due to the decline in rental rates for drilling rigs, and also that the companies are planning wells that can be drilled faster. The actual drilling operation has also become more efficient, so that the price per metre of well will be much lower than before.Investments in pipelines and cables are also expected to decline significantly. This is a result of falling prices for materials, and choosing different routes. Simplified development solutions and less costly materials will yield more reasonably priced modifications and adaptations of facilities where the oil and gas from new developments will be taken in and processed.Despite the positive development in the cost scenario, Sølvberg cautions against short-term savings at the expense of long-term value creation on the shelf. She also warns against cutting staff in important technical environments, as it could impair the capacity for innovation and the ability to find smart solutions.The NPD has noted tendencies where companies prioritise minimum investment in the development phase, but that could limit subsequent upgrades of the facilities, or make them more expensive.“We must not put ourselves in a situation where cost cuts reduce the future flexibility on the fields, or have a detrimental impact on our ability and willingness to use technology that can provide better and more efficient resource management,” says the development director.last_img read more

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The Budget: Time to deliver

first_imgSubscribe to Building today and you will benefit from:Unlimited access to all stories including expert analysis and comment from industry leadersOur league tables, cost models and economics dataOur online archive of over 10,000 articlesBuilding magazine digital editionsBuilding magazine print editionsPrinted/digital supplementsSubscribe now for unlimited access.View our subscription options and join our community Get your free guest access  SIGN UP TODAY To continue enjoying Building.co.uk, sign up for free guest accessExisting subscriber? LOGIN Subscribe now for unlimited access Stay at the forefront of thought leadership with news and analysis from award-winning journalists. Enjoy company features, CEO interviews, architectural reviews, technical project know-how and the latest innovations.Limited access to building.co.ukBreaking industry news as it happensBreaking, daily and weekly e-newsletterslast_img read more

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Georgia man guilty in death of toddler left in SUV

first_img SHARE Author: Associated Press Georgia man guilty in death of toddler left in SUV BRUNSWICK, Ga. (AP) – A Georgia man whose toddler son died in a hot car was found guilty of murder charges Monday by a jury tasked with weighing a month of dueling testimony over whether the child’s father left him to perish on purpose or made a fatal mistake.Justin Ross Harris, 35, had been on trial since Oct. 3 in the death of his son, Cooper.The 22-month-old boy died after being left for hours in the back of Harris’ SUV on June 18, 2014. Harris said he forgot to drop his son off at day care that morning and drove straight to his job as a web developer for Home Depot, not realizing Cooper was still in his car seat.Soon afterward, investigators found evidence that Harris was having sexual relationships – both online banter and in-person affairs – with numerous women, including a prostitute and a teenager. Prosecutors charged Harris with malice murder, saying he intentionally killed his son in order to escape the responsibilities of family life.Harris was also charged with felony murder, which required no proof of intent to kill – just that Cooper died as a result of his father committing the felony of cruelty to children.Prosecutors argued Harris must have known Cooper was in the car. He drove less than two minutes to work after strapping the child into his car seat when they finished breakfast at a Chick-fil-A restaurant just over a half-mile from Harris’ office. Parking lot surveillance video showed Harris also went to his car after lunch and tossed in some light bulbs he had purchased, though he never got inside.Harris told police he didn’t notice Cooper until he left work for the day to go to a movie. The boy was dead, having sweltered in the car for about seven hours.Prosecutors said Harris left online clues to murderous intentions. Evidence showed that minutes before Harris locked the car door on his boy, he sent an online message: “I love my son and all, but we both need escapes.” Five days earlier, Harris watched an online video in which a veterinarian sits inside a hot car to show it reaches 116 degrees in a half-hour.Defense attorneys said Harris was responsible for his son’s death, but insisted it was an accident rather than a crime. Friends and family members testified he was a devoted and loving father, and the jury watched video clips of Harris trying to teach Cooper to say “banana” and letting the boy strum his guitar. The joyous moments had some jurors laughing aloud.Harris’ ex-wife, Leanna Taylor, also came to his defense. She divorced him in March and bitterly told the jury that Harris “destroyed my life.” But she testified he was a loving father who, regardless of how unhappy he may have been in their marriage, would not have harmed their son on purpose.Also testifying in Harris’ defense was Gene Brewer, an Arizona State University psychology professor who specializes in memory and attention. He said it would have been possible for Harris to forget about Cooper in a matter of seconds.Harris was also found guilty of sending sexual text messages to a teenage girl and asked for nude photos of her pubic area. The girl testified Harris knew she was in high school the months they swapped sexual banter when she was 16 and 17, and Harris several times sent her photos of his penis. He was asking for a photo of her breasts the day Cooper died.Harris moved to Georgia from Tuscaloosa, Alabama, in 2012. He lived in the Atlanta suburb of Cobb County, which is also where Cooper died. Because of intense pretrial publicity surrounding the case, the judge agreed to relocate Harris’ trial 275 miles away in the coastal port city of Brunswick.center_img Do you see a typo or an error? Let us know. Published: November 14, 2016 3:39 PM EST last_img read more

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Tribunal increases solicitors’ punishment after SRA appeal

first_imgThe Solicitors Disciplinary Tribunal has imposed a tougher sanction on two solicitors involved in tax avoidance following an appeal by the regulator.The tribunal last week suspended Richard Chan and Rajob Ali for three years for their part in operating stamp duty land tax avoidance schemes.The sanction for the pair, who were partners at Abode Solicitors in Harrogate, was originally set in September 2014 at a £15,000 fine for each. But the matter was returned to the tribunal after the divisional court agreed the case should be reheard, following an appeal by the Solicitors Regulation Authority.The SRA stated the pair had shown a lack of integrity, had acted where there was a conflict of interest and had taken part in transactions that were dubious.Chan and Ali were also ordered to pay a further £5,500 in costs.David Middleton, SRA executive director, said: ‘We welcome this new sanction by the Tribunal. Mr Chan and Mr Ali were not acting in their clients’ best interests when involving them in these schemes – they were acting without integrity and their independence had been compromised.

‘We warned solicitors in 2012 that there was a risk of serious consequences if they did not comply with the professional principles while promoting or facilitating SDLT avoidance schemes.‘Solicitors need to do the right thing and act with integrity. This new sanction sends out a strong message about how important that is.’The original tribunal hearing found both solicitors, who advised clients on schemes through their own separate Seychelles-based business, liable for 20 breaches of the code of conduct.They were also responsible for 12 breaches of accounts rules, including using the funds of one client to benefit another. Other matters were also included, among them disposing of old client files in a skip.The SRA closed Abode Solicitors in October 2013.last_img read more

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Law Commission proposes wide-reaching wills overhaul

first_imgOutdated Victorian-era laws surrounding wills need an overhaul, the Law Commission says today in a wide-ranging consultation aimed at bringing the law into step with the modern world. Among its proposals are that the lord chancellor should have the power to make provisions for electronic wills, once technical obstacles are overcome. In a consultation document published today the commission said current laws are failing to protect the vulnerable. For example the law relies on a Victorian mental capacity test involving ’delusions’ of the mind, not reflecting an understanding of conditions such as dementia where mental capacity can be changeable.According to the commission, this differs from the position in the Mental Capacity Act 2005 – the modern test for capacity. The consultation document proposes that the test for mental capacity set out in the 2005 act should be adopted for testators and that the specific elements of capacity necessary to make a will should be outlined in legislation. It is estimated that around 40% of adults dying each year have not made out a will. But even for those who do have a will, the commission said if formal rules are not followed – even when it is clear what someone’s intentions were – people’s dying wishes can sometimes not be acted on.The consultation paper proposes giving courts the power to recognise a will in cases where formality rules have not been followed but where the will-maker has made their intentions clear.Nick Hopkins, law commissioner, said: ‘Making a will and passing on your possessions after you’ve died should be straight-forward. But the law is unclear, outdated and could even be putting people off altogether. Even when it’s obvious what someone wanted, if they haven’t followed the strict rules, courts can’t act on it. And conditions which affect decision-making – like dementia – aren’t properly accounted for in the law.’The consultation document does not go into detail about any proposed changes that may impact the Supreme Court’s ruling earlier this year in Ilott v The Blue Cross and Ors – though a line in the footnotes acknowledges the judgment. However, the law commission does reference the importance of testamentary freedom, which the judgment confirmed.According to the commission, the fact that a testator favours a charity over family and friends is not a ground to ’cast suspicion’ over a will. ‘Such decisions are the expression of testamentary freedom, not an indication that a vulnerable testator has been abused,’ the document states.
The commission is also proposing reforms including;Ditching the term ‘testator’ in favour of ‘will-maker’;Lowering the minimum age for making a will from 18 to 16;Legalising electronic wills – subject to finding a secure way for the testator and witnesses to sign them digitally. The Law Society said the consultation was welcome but that some of the proposals raised ‘challenging questions’.President Joe Egan said: ‘Some of the proposals, such as allowing the court more flexibility when there are harmless errors in a will but the deceased person’s wishes are clear, show immediate promise and are likely to get a positive response from solicitors. Others, such as enabling wills to be made electronically in the future, raise important but challenging questions, especially on how safe electronic wills would be from fraud or undue influence against vulnerable people.’The consultation will run until 10 November 2017.last_img read more

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President Kiir arrives in Kenya for official two-day visit

first_imgEthiopian president makes first official visit to Kenya Seychelles President starts official visit in Kenya South Sudanese President Salva Kiir arrived in Kenya on Monday for a scheduled two-day visit, his second trip to the country in five weeks.The 67-year-old, accompanied by a high-level delegation from Juba, was received in Nairobi by Kenyan President Uhuru Kenyatta.Kiir was honoured with a 21-gun salute upon arrival at State House, Nairobi, before inspecting a guard of honour mounted by the Kenya ArmyThe two presidents held a one-on-one meeting before leading their delegations in bilateral talks focusing on various issues.Regional security is expected to be a major point of discussion in the meetings. Kenya has deployed troops to South Sudan to help in peacekeeping duties.South Sudan has been dogged by violence since December 2013, killing tens of thousands and displacing millions others.Finding lasting peace in the continent’s youngest nation remains a major agenda for the African Union and international partners.Salva Kiir last visited Kenya on 30 May when the country’s leadership led citizens in a national prayer day.After the arrival of President Kiir in Nairobi on Monday, the Kenyan presidency said the visit would “consolidate the mutually beneficial cooperation between the two countries at bilateral and multilateral levels.”Relatedcenter_img Somali President to make first official visit to neighboring Kenyalast_img read more

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Hunting/fishing season officially closed

first_img Share Sharing is caring! Tweet LocalNews Hunting/fishing season officially closed by: – January 4, 2013 The Forestry, Wildlife and Parks Division of the Ministry of Agriculture and Forestry has announced the close of the 2012 hunting and fishing season.The season which came to an official end on December 31, 2012 prevents citizens from engaging in hunting and fishing of wildlife.“There is a total ban on hunting; absolutely no wildlife should be hunted until the next time the moratorium is lifted,” assistant forestry officer Ronald Charles told Dominica Vibes News.As of January 1, 2013, the moratorium on hunting of wildlife and fishing in freshwater streams has resumed until further notice. The Division is soliciting the co-operation of all concerned in an effort to managing the wildlife resources of Dominica in a sustainable manner.AgoutiThere has also been an extension for the issuance of export permits for the exportation of Wildlife.“We have allowed an extra grace period for those people who are here for the holidays, who will be travelling back after December 31st, to legally export wildlife. So they have an extra month to travel back,” Charles further explained.These can be obtained until January 31st, 2013.The general public is further reminded that it is an offence under the Forestry & Wildlife Act to hunt or fish in freshwater streams without a valid license.The hunting of the Mountain Chicken, all Birds, and Iguanas is strictly prohibited.Dominica Vibes Newscenter_img Share Share 22 Views   no discussionslast_img read more

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