Shapiro petitions for Bar reinstatement

first_img Shapiro petitions for Bar reinstatement Pursuant to Rule 3-7.10, James J. Shapiro of Boca Raton has petitioned the Supreme Court of Florida for Bar reinstatement.In an order dated October 17, 2005, the court suspended Shapiro for one year nunc pro tunc to May 6, 2005. The suspension was entered as reciprocal discipline to a one year suspension entered by the New York Bar for improper solicitation of clients and advertising violations.Any persons having knowledge bearing upon Shapiro’s fitness or qualifications to resume the practice of law should contact Cheryl L. Soler, legal assistant for The Florida Bar, at (954) 772-2245. Shapiro petitions for Bar reinstatement June 1, 2007 Regular Newslast_img read more

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Mr. Orange and Blue

first_imgMr. Orange and Blue Mark D. Killian Managing EditorIf you have been to the Swamp to watch the University of Florida Gators play football over the past 26 seasons, you’ve seen Richard Johnston, a bankruptcy attorney from Ft. Myers. But it is not his well-mannered, professional, board-certified legal skills that are on display. No, on football Saturdays, Johnston morphs into the madcap “Mr. Orange and Blue,” leading the Gator faithful in cheers and working the crowd into a frenzy — all while running around the field wearing his trademark Crocs clogs, one orange and one blue.“It is one of the biggest rushes I could ever imagine,” said Johnston, a Fowler White Boggs lawyer who described his role as a ringmaster who gets to “flip the switch” on 90,000 people. “I’m with all the cheerleaders; I have a 300-piece band behind me spelling the letters out. It is overwhelming to be able to rev them up. I know what I do is not the centerpiece, but it is an element of the electricity of Gator football.”He sees it as his job to build excitement to a peak and help make Ben Hill Griffin Stadium a tough place for opponents to play football.“I’m just a fan who escaped onto the field with a microphone,” Johnston said. “I don’t have any special training.”But he does have a history with UF, earning his undergraduate and law degrees from Florida and serving as a cheerleader in 1978 and 1980 — his senior year as an undergrad and his second year of law school, respectively. It was during his second stint as a rah-rah that he got on the microphone.“It was a good year to do it because we had just come off of 0-10-1, the first year of the Charlie Pell era. You could say ‘boo’ and they would scream,” Johnston said. “It was a good year. We were winning. It is always easier to be a cheerleader when you are winning.”He must have made a good impression. Three years later, when Johnston was toiling as a young lawyer at the venerable Ervin firm in Tallahassee, the Gators came calling.“I’m like, there is no way this conservative Tallahassee firm that is half full of Seminoles and half full of Gators is ever going to let me do this,” Johnston said.But the then-26-year-old summoned up the intestinal fortitude to approach senior partner Bob Ervin, a former Florida Bar president, about reprising his energetic role.“I said, ‘Bob, the university wants me to come in and get things revved up before the games on the football field. What do you think?’” Johnston said. “I’m wincing, waiting for the ‘no.’“And he says, ‘Why Richard, I think it is a marvelous idea. Do mention the firm’s name and telephone number while you are on the field,’” said Johnston, imitating Ervin’s gentlemanly Southern drawl.Now 51, Johnston still brings high energy to his game day cheers.“Anybody can announce,” he said. “I hope what I bring to the table is something that is a little more exciting and adds to the color and excitement of college football.”His job also entails making on-field introductions of those who have done great things for the university, including donors, those who have excelled in academics, and other athletes.“It is the epicenter of the Gator Nation, a moment when all the University of Florida’s fans’ eyes are focused on the field,” Johnston said. “And I want to make that moment for those people very special.”Johnston has not missed a home game in 26 years. Some of his greatest memories include the Gators’ 14-9 victory over Florida State in 1991; both teams were ranked in the top five that year. The Gators had just clinched their first SEC championship, and it took a late defensive stand in the fourth quarter to preserve the victory.“That may have been one of the most intense dogfights of a game I ever remember seeing,” he said.Another was in November 2006 against the Steve Spurrier-led University of South Carolina squad. With seconds to go, the Gamecocks lined up for a possibly game-winning 48-yard field goal that, if successful, would have likely ended any hope of the Gators’ national championship quest. But Florida’s 6-foot-6 defensive end Jarvis Moss blocked the kick, preserving a 17-16 victory.“It went from being so quiet — like a church — to just bedlam,” Johnston recalled.Florida went on to defeat Ohio State in the BCS National Championship game.He even got a national championship ring on the occasion of his 25th year on the sidelines.“It’s as big as a Volkswagen,” he said.Johnston is married to a Seminole fan who says her husband has the oddest hobby on Earth.“That is true,” admits Johnston, who jokingly adds he will keep working Gator games “until they pry the microphone out of my cold, dead hands.” October 15, 2009 Managing Editor Regular News ‘I’m just a fan who escaped onto the field with a microphone’ Mr. Orange and Bluelast_img read more

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Robinson’s camps teach youths ‘life skills’

first_img“It’s about as intense as you can get,” he said. “I mean you can’t put these kids through much more than we already do put them through.”But that’s what Robinson said makes the difference between his camps and others being offered.“Most sports camps are skill development,” he said. “(My training) has more to do with (work ethic) than just the technical part of it.”Robinson said the work ethic is something that goes a long way into giving youths a life skill.Larrieu said he hopes those skills will transfer into better results on the mat this coming year and possibly in the future at Minnesota.“This is a really big college that I look forward to hopefully coming to one year,” Larrieu said of the Minnesota wrestling program.Larrieu would break the streak of J Robinson campers coming to Minnesota. No current Gophers wrestler has been to Robinson’s camp before coming to school at Minnesota.But first, Larrieu has to complete his junior and senior year of high school.“These are high school kids that want to be good,” Robinson said. “They don’t know how to be good, and what we do is we teach them work ethic on how they can be successful.” Robinson’s camps teach youths ‘life skills’J Robinson’s intensive camps are one of six types of wrestling camps offered. Robert MewsJuly 19, 2006Jump to CommentsShare on FacebookShare on TwitterShare via EmailPrintDespite temperatures soaring past 90 degrees the past few days, a herd of runners still took to University streets with athletic improvement on their minds.These runners weren’t just any collection of athletes, but 14- to 18-year-olds who paid $2,149 to give up 28 days of summer fun for a life-altering experience at J Robinson’s intensive wrestling camp.“Last year I had a disappointing season (wrestling),” said Trenton Larrieu, a Spring Valley, Wis., high school wrestler, of his decision to come to the camp. “I figured this is the way to get better.”That is just what J Robinson, Minnesota’s wrestling coach for the past 20 years, had in mind when he started the camps for youths 28 years ago.Robinson has a variety of nationwide camps to choose from. Along with six types of wrestling camps, Robinson also has basketball and hockey camps.“I think you start them just like any other coach,” Robinson said. “You just start them as part of your program. Try and help the younger wrestlers get better.”But Robinson’s intensive camp isn’t like other camps.The 28-day camp is the longest of all of his camps, with a typical day starting at 6:30 a.m. and ending at 11 p.m. It includes plenty of running and weight lifting as well as unorthodox training techniques to help develop what Robinson calls “life skills.”“It’s hard. The intensity really picks up as the camp goes,” Larrieu said.Current Gophers wrestler Mack Reiter helps the youngsters train and said some can’t make it through because of the duration and intensity of training.last_img read more

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Impossible Knowledge: Are You an Expert?

first_imgThe Huffington Post:I grew up with a habitual overclaimer. He wildly exaggerated his expertise, at times claiming knowledge of things he couldn’t possibly know — people, events, ideas that simply do not exist. Being unfamiliar with overclaiming, I just called him a liar.I couldn’t have known the word “overclaimer,” nor the concept. The word didn’t exist and is only used today in the world of psychological science. Even so, we’re all familiar with these people who feel the need to overestimate what they know about the world. What underlies such assertions of impossible knowledge?Read the whole story: The Huffington PostWray Herbert is an author and award-winning journalist who writes two popular blogs for APS, We’re Only Human and Full Frontal Psychology. Follow Wray on Twitter @wrayherbert. More of our Members in the Media >last_img read more

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Probe finds central-line infections still problematic in US hospitals

first_imgEarlier this year, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) released data showing that US hospitals had met national targets by reducing central-line bloodstream infections by 50% between 2008 and 2014. The drop in these infections, which make up roughly 5% of all healthcare-associated infections (HAIs), was hailed as a success story.But according to a new investigation from Consumer Reports, central-line infections remain a substantial problem for many US hospitals.While the investigation does not dispute the CDC data, it indicates that progress across the country has not been even. Using data from the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS), Consumer Reports investigated nearly 2,000 US teaching hospitals to see which ones have successfully reduced central-line infections, and which haven’t. Thirty-two hospitals made the top performer list, while 31 were identified on the magazine’s “lowest-performer” list.Among the top performing hospitals is Mount Auburn Hospital in Cambridge, Mass., which from 2014 to 2015 reported only 1 infection in intensive care unit (ICU) patients with central lines. Among the lowest performers is UF Health Jacksonville in Jacksonville, Fla., which reported more than 100 central-line infections in ICU patients from 2014 to 2015.The report also showed substantial differences between states, with more than 75% of teaching hospitals in Minnesota and Wisconsin meeting the national target for central-line infections, while only a third of hospitals in Louisiana met the target.“Because teaching hospitals are teaching our next generation of physicians, we think it’s critical to monitor them closely,” Doris Peter, PhD, director of the Consumer Reports Health Ratings Center, said in a Consumer Report news release. “Our review of their performance on controlling central-line infections is very sobering.”Central-line infections struck more than 27,000 people in 2015, according to Consumer Reports, are fatal in up to a quarter of cases, and cost $46,000 to treat on average.Central-line infections and resistanceA central venous catheter, also known as a central line, is a tube that providers place in a large vein in the neck, chest, groin or arm to quickly give fluid, blood, or medication to a patient. They are important in treating conditions in a variety of healthcare settings, but are often used in ICU patients and can remain in place for weeks or months.But when central lines aren’t inserted correctly, or aren’t adequately cleaned, they provide an access point for bacteria to enter the bloodstream and spread to the heart and other organs. When the bacteria are drug-resistant, deadly infections can ensue.According to the CDC, one in six central-line infections can be caused by antibiotic-resistant bacteria the agency considers a serious or urgent threat, such as methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) or carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae (CRE). When these infections occur, physicians have limited options for treatment.”Many hospital-acquired infections are going to be of a drug-resistant variety,” Amesh Adalja, MD, an infectious disease and emergency medicine specialist at the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center and member of the Infectious Disease Society of America, told CIDRAP News. “Organisms like MRSA, for example, represent a high burden of central-line infections.”As a result, cutting down on central-line infections is a critical element in the CDC’s efforts to combat antibiotic resistance.”To get a handle on multidrug-resistant infections, you have to drill down and see which infections they are causing, and central-line infections are one major component of that burden,” Adalja says. “So by minimizing central-line infections, you will have some effect on drug-resistant infections in general.”Furthermore, cutting down on central-line infections will aid antibiotic stewardship by decreasing the use of antibiotics like vancomycin, which is commonly used to treat MRSA infections. “It will reduce the need for these antibiotics if you have less of these infections,” Adalja says.Safety protocols play a critical roleThe effort to reduce central-line infections and other types of HAIs in US hospitals stems back to 2008, when the Department of Health and Human Services determined that eliminating HAIs was a top safety priority. The Affordable Care Act, with its provisions that lower Medicare payments for hospitals with high infection rates, has also fostered improvements.Hospitals across the country have had far more success in reducing central-line infections than they’ve had with other types of HAIs. According to the Consumer Reports investigation, that’s due in part to following a set of protocols developed 15 years ago by Peter Pronovost, MD, who currently serves as senior vice president for patient safety and quality at Johns Hopkins Medicine in Baltimore, MD.Pronovost’s checklist contains five basic steps that physicians should follow when placing a central-line catheter. The steps include washing hands; cleaning a patient’s skin with chlorhexidine; wearing a mask, hat, gown, and gloves and putting sterile drapes over the patient; avoiding placement of the catheter near the groin, where infection rates are higher; and removing the catheter as soon as possible.While central-line infections are always going to be a risk, Adalja believes they can be reduced even more by minimizing the use of central lines, using different types of intravenous devices, or employing new innovations, like antibiotic-impregnated central catheters. “There are a whole bunch of things that can be used to try and get the rate even lower,” he said.See also:Nov 21 Consumer Reports investigationNov 21 Consumer Reports news releaseMarch 2016 CDC HAI progress reportlast_img read more

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On The Job In Los Alamos: Warner Waving At Motorists

first_imgOn the job in Los Alamos is Larry Warner, 87, spotted Tuesday morning on his ‘geriatric jog’ as he likes to refer to his daily two mile walk on North Mesa. A reader contacted the Los Alamos Daily Post about Warner and expressed gratitude for the fact that he smiles and waves at every car that passes by him during his walks. Photo by Jennifer Bartram/ladailypost.comlast_img

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People Moves: Capita Real Estate, Goodwin, Lodders and more

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Air Products employee honoured

first_imgGet instant access to must-read content today!To access hundreds of features, subscribe today! At a time when the world is forced to go digital more than ever before just to stay connected, discover the in-depth content our subscribers receive every month by subscribing to gasworld.Don’t just stay connected, stay at the forefront – join gasworld and become a subscriber to access all of our must-read content online from just $270. Subscribelast_img

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Norwegian Offshore Developments See $14.5 Bln Cost Drop

first_img“The oil companies and the supplier industry have made a tremendous effort in streamlining the activities, and now we can see that these measures are working.” The price tag for developing a field on the Norwegian shelf has declined by an average of more than 40 per cent since the autumn of 2014, according to theNorwegian Petroleum Directorate’s (NPD’s) analysis of eight planned developments that are approaching start-up.The decline is a result of a combination of simpler development concepts and more efficient drilling. Lower prices for work and equipment are also a contributing factor.The investment estimates for the Utgard, Oda, Zidane, Trestakk, Snilehorn, Johan Castberg, Snorre Expansion and Johan Sverdrup Phase 2 projects have fallen from about NOK 270 ($32.5 billion) to 150 billion (approx. $18 billion), according to the operating companies’ own calculations. The downward adjustments have been made in connection with various decision phases in project implementation.“This is a significant and very welcome reduction”, says the NPD’s director of development and operations, Ingrid Sølvberg. The biggest savings on these eight projects are a result of altered development solutions. The second largest reduction is within drilling and wells, which on average accounts for around 30 per cent of the overall field development costs. This is due to the decline in rental rates for drilling rigs, and also that the companies are planning wells that can be drilled faster. The actual drilling operation has also become more efficient, so that the price per metre of well will be much lower than before.Investments in pipelines and cables are also expected to decline significantly. This is a result of falling prices for materials, and choosing different routes. Simplified development solutions and less costly materials will yield more reasonably priced modifications and adaptations of facilities where the oil and gas from new developments will be taken in and processed.Despite the positive development in the cost scenario, Sølvberg cautions against short-term savings at the expense of long-term value creation on the shelf. She also warns against cutting staff in important technical environments, as it could impair the capacity for innovation and the ability to find smart solutions.The NPD has noted tendencies where companies prioritise minimum investment in the development phase, but that could limit subsequent upgrades of the facilities, or make them more expensive.“We must not put ourselves in a situation where cost cuts reduce the future flexibility on the fields, or have a detrimental impact on our ability and willingness to use technology that can provide better and more efficient resource management,” says the development director.last_img read more

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The Budget: Time to deliver

first_imgSubscribe to Building today and you will benefit from:Unlimited access to all stories including expert analysis and comment from industry leadersOur league tables, cost models and economics dataOur online archive of over 10,000 articlesBuilding magazine digital editionsBuilding magazine print editionsPrinted/digital supplementsSubscribe now for unlimited access.View our subscription options and join our community Get your free guest access  SIGN UP TODAY To continue enjoying Building.co.uk, sign up for free guest accessExisting subscriber? LOGIN Subscribe now for unlimited access Stay at the forefront of thought leadership with news and analysis from award-winning journalists. Enjoy company features, CEO interviews, architectural reviews, technical project know-how and the latest innovations.Limited access to building.co.ukBreaking industry news as it happensBreaking, daily and weekly e-newsletterslast_img read more

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