Letter To The Editor: What Pride Means To Me…

first_imgBy KEN NEBELLos AlamosThere has been some controversy as to whether or not PRIDE, the commemoration of historic steps toward the LGBTQ+ community stepping out into the mainstream and the celebration of the LGBTQ+ community, is still a current need.As we celebrate Pride month and host our 2nd annual Pride festival today here in Los Alamos, I’d like to tell you what Pride means to me.Pride is an affirmation that I live in a supportive community when, even in todays culture, I don’t always find acceptance or tolerance. Pride is a place to learn more about something that makes each of us so fundamentally unique. Pride is a place where, for once, it doesn’t feel like opening my mouth to say something trivial or benign is an act of coming out.This year I had the honor of helping award scholarships to LGTBQ youth and young adults, and the spectrum of experience that these individuals had related to their sexual identities broadened my horizons, and the various levels of acceptance in their communities and families was astounding to me.I feel very strongly that it is our duty as a community to band together in support of the LGTBQ+ community, to teach about identity, and to celebrate that we as a community can learn and grow.last_img read more

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2020 Knights Of Columbus Free Throw Results

first_imgScene from the 2020 Knights of Columbus Free Throw Championship Feb. 2 at Griffith Gym. Courtesy/KofC Scene from the 2020 Knights of Columbus Free Throw Championship Feb. 2 at Griffith Gym. Courtesy/KofC Scene from the 2020 Knights of Columbus Free Throw Championship Feb. 2 at Griffith Gym. Courtesy/KofC Scene from the 2020 Knights of Columbus Free Throw Championship Feb. 2 at Griffith Gym. Courtesy/KofC Scene from the 2020 Knights of Columbus Free Throw Championship Feb. 2 at Griffith Gym. Courtesy/KofC 2020 Knights of Columbus Free Throw Championship participants and coaches. Courtesy/KofCScene from the 2020 Knights of Columbus Free Throw Championship Feb. 2 at Griffith Gym. Courtesy/KofCScene from the 2020 Knights of Columbus Free Throw Championship Feb. 2 at Griffith Gym. Courtesy/KofCK Of C News:Four boys and five girls, ages 9 to 14, were named local champions of the 2020 Knights of Columbus Free Throw Championship and have earned the right to compete at the district level.Each contestant was allowed 15 free throw attempts in the contests. Ties were settled by successive rounds of five free throws per contestant until a winner emerged. Sacred Heart Council #3137 in Los Alamos sponsored the local competition Sunday, Feb. 2 in Griffith Gymnasium at Los Alamos High School. All youngsters ages 9 to 14 were eligible to participate. Damian Scammell was crowned 9-year-old boys champion and Edna Gartz took the girls title. In the 10-year-old division, Michael Velasquez-Saiz and Akesa Gartz were crowned champions, Sam Prada and Gerianna Romero won the 11-year-old division and Olivia Martinez and Z Garts won the 12-year-old division. Rounding up the list of champions was Abigail Martinez who won the 14-year-old girls title. The Knights of Columbus recognizes all runner-ups which include: Lucas Montoya (9-year-old), Cade Rich (10), Maya Graves (10), Maddox Martinez (12), and Kimberly Prada (14). Each of these winners will now advance to compete in the district free throw championships, which will be held at 1 p.m., Saturday, Feb. 29 in Griffith Gymnasium at Los Alamos High School with an eye toward moving on to the state championships, which will be held in March in Albuquerque (Location TBD).The Knights of Columbus would like to thank everyone who participated in this year’s local competition. They also would like to thank Los Alamos Public Schools for the use of Griffith Gymnasium.Scene from the 2020 Knights of Columbus Free Throw Championship Feb. 2 at Griffith Gym. Courtesy/KofC Scene from the 2020 Knights of Columbus Free Throw Championship Feb. 2 at Griffith Gym. Courtesy/KofC Scene from the 2020 Knights of Columbus Free Throw Championship Feb. 2 at Griffith Gym. Courtesy/KofC Scene from the 2020 Knights of Columbus Free Throw Championship Feb. 2 at Griffith Gym. Courtesy/KofClast_img read more

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Livingstone’s MIPIM appearance in doubt following suspension

first_imgTo access this article REGISTER NOWWould you like print copies, app and digital replica access too? SUBSCRIBE for as little as £5 per week. Would you like to read more?Register for free to finish this article.Sign up now for the following benefits:Four FREE articles of your choice per monthBreaking news, comment and analysis from industry experts as it happensChoose from our portfolio of email newsletterslast_img

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In memoriam: John ‘Jack’ Miaskowski

first_imgJohn ‘Jack’ MiaskowskiJohn, of Strongsville, Ohio was in advertising/sales for over 50 years, 16 of them with CryoGas International (now gasworld) where, as Advertising Sales Manager, he helped grow the magazine into the industrial gas and welding industry’s most respected business journal.In the process of closing many deals, he made a legendary number of friends within that industry. John was the consummate sales professional who lived life to the fullest and was always willing to lend a helping hand and to offer a kind word. His positive attitude was an inspiration to all who knew him.John is survived by his wife of 55 years, Kathy, who was always at his side at the GAWDA annual conventions. He also leaves his three daughters, Kathy (Pat) Spoerndle, Lisa (Matt) Arnold and Maureen (Scott) Lessing, and nine grandchildren of whom he was so proud.In lieu of flowers, donations may be made to the Rotary Club of Strongsville, Ohio and online condolences maybe left at www.jardinefh.comlast_img read more

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A Tanzanian teaching experience

first_img John Irving is director of LPC training and development at BPP Law School One of the greatest rewards for any coach, mentor or trainer in the development process is to be able to help individuals and teams realise their potential and develop their talent. The ‘dream’ scenario is that, before your eyes, skills are gradually mastered, performance improved and confidence built and sustained, especially when challenged by the inevitable uncertainties, challenges and difficulties that can arise. One of the most satisfying parts of my role has always been the coaching, mentoring and development of new and existing tutors. For many years I have been designing and delivering a comprehensive five-day teacher training and ‘train the trainer’ course for tutors, which I aim to gear to the specific needs of the participants. I was incredibly excited when I was asked by the International Lawyers Project (ILP) to transport our course to Tanzania to provide training for the Tanzanian Law School’s part-time staff. At this early stage of the evolution of the school the tutors were keen to share best practice on teaching law students on the Tanzanian equivalent of our Legal Practice Course. In particular, the Tanzanian tutors were interested to receive detailed training on the facilitation of ‘learning by doing’ (LBD) to enhance student application, analysis and levels of learning. An additional challenge for the tutors was to adapt such interactive training skills to working at certain times with classes of up to 50 or even 100. We spent a truly special week with an incredibly friendly and talented group of Tanzanian tutors. We were based in excellent conference facilities at the White Sands Hotel, about 30 minutes north of the centre of Dar Es Salaam, or three times that if you got caught in the horrendous Dar traffic. It was extraordinary to be extolling such topics as the virtues of student-centred learning and the most effective techniques for facilitating group work alongside shimmering white sands and the turquoise waters of the Indian Ocean crashing onto the shore. It soon became clear to us that the tutors had a rich mix of talent and creative potential and were strongly committed to extending the use of LBD in their teaching. However, many of them needed the confidence to move from traditional didactic methods which they had experienced in their own education and which they used in their own teaching, to the more unpredictable, but much more effective student-centred approach. Much careful planning was needed by our team to reflect the Tanzanian legal training system, and some harsh teaching practicalities, plus Tanzanian customs, attitudes, interests and beliefs. Evenings by the beach were not as lazy as you might first think as we worked nightly on revising and even creating new materials, particularly on confidence development – luckily one of our great interests. However, we were inspired by the energy, commitment and inherent creative ability of the Tanzanian tutors. Unlocking the potential and growing tutor confidence was also helped by constantly working on the creation and maintenance of rapport and motivation. This was always achieved by physical activity, sporting analogies (no one believed me when I said England would win the World Cup), laughter and even singing. The fact that all of the tutors avidly followed at least one of England’s top Premier League teams also gave us plenty of ideas for innovative sessions in the course. It is wonderful to reflect now on the great bond we developed with the group. We found we had so much to share and learn from them, something that we had definitely underestimated. For example, Dr Ringo Tenga’s innovative teaching of airspace ownership will live long in our memories and would be a useful addition to the explanatory skills of any property solicitor, tutor or trainer. However, our most precious memory was to watch and feed back on individual tutor presentations on the final day of the course. Each tutor was asked to design and run an interactive activity, which had to include a mix of auditory, kinaesthetic and visual learning. We were thrilled to see the higher level of performance, creativity and increased confidence within the group. We were hugely impressed and feel sure that the Tanzanian tutors can approach their LBD revolution with confidence. There is no question that this was one of the most rewarding projects that any of us have ever been involved in. We were also touched at the excellent feedback we received from the group and especially by the kind words of Dr Fauz Twaib, one of the most experienced tutors, at the end of the course. Dr Twaib has been appointed a High Court judge since the course. I am certain that the course and his appointment were not connected! The administration and support given to us by the ILP and Tanzanian Law School, particularly from acting principal Dr Gerald Ndika, were superb. We also had thanks for the other members of our training team for their creativity, skills, resilience, good humour and commitment which led to such a memorable experience. I know that I speak for all of us by saying that we would be keen to share again in the development journey of the law school tutors, and are grateful to the ILP for giving us this wonderful opportunity.last_img read more

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Recent housing data poses the question: Higher, Lower or Stick for prices?

first_imgSubscribe to Building today and you will benefit from:Unlimited access to all stories including expert analysis and comment from industry leadersOur league tables, cost models and economics dataOur online archive of over 10,000 articlesBuilding magazine digital editionsBuilding magazine print editionsPrinted/digital supplementsSubscribe now for unlimited access.View our subscription options and join our community Get your free guest access  SIGN UP TODAY Subscribe now for unlimited access Stay at the forefront of thought leadership with news and analysis from award-winning journalists. Enjoy company features, CEO interviews, architectural reviews, technical project know-how and the latest innovations.Limited access to building.co.ukBreaking industry news as it happensBreaking, daily and weekly e-newsletters To continue enjoying Building.co.uk, sign up for free guest accessExisting subscriber? LOGINlast_img read more

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Yilport places Konecranes order

first_imgTwo of the Konecranes mobile harbour cranes will begin operations in Puerto Quetzal, Guatemala, in mid-2019. The final two units will be delivered to Puerto Bolivar, Ecuador later this year. The G HMK 8410 cranes feature a lifting capacity of up to 100 tonnes and a maximum outreach of 61 m.www.konecranes.comyilport.comlast_img

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Rioters in Guinea burn down police buildings in mining town of…

first_imgHundreds of rioters in the Guinean bauxite mining town of Boke burned down a police and a gendarmerie building on Thursday and clashed with security forces wielding batons, leaving 17 people injured, the local Red Cross said.Guinean authorities managed to avoid the bloodshed of previous days by desisting from using live bullets on the demonstrators in the Boke neighborhood of Kolabounyi, Guinean Red Cross member Oumar Kalissa told Reuters by telephone.Rioting by angry youths – who say bauxite mining has brought constant pollution and noise but no jobs or services like water and electricity – has paralyzed Boke for most of the past week.Despite decades of mining, Guinea, Africa’s top bauxite producer, remains one of the world’s least developed countries.The mines around Boke produce some 15 million tonnes of aluminum ore for the West African nation’s largest mining companies Societe Miniere de Boke (SMB) and Companie Bauxite de Guinee (CBG), but their operations have repeatedly halted in the past week and are currently still blocked by demonstrators.CBG is 49 percent owned by the Guinean state and the remainder by Alcoa, Rio Tinto Alcan [RIOXXA.UL] and Dadco. SMB is owned by Guinea, China’s Winning Shipping Ltd, Shandong Weiqiao [SDWQP.UL] and UMS International Ltd.“The Government strongly condemns these acts which are clearly outside law,” government spokesman Damantang Albert Camara said in a statement.last_img read more

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Kenya’s athletics body bans cheats from Olympics, world championships

first_imgAthletics Kenya President Jackson Tuwei(R) Kenya’s top athletic governance body has set a raft of changes for athlete qualification to represent the country in world championships and the Olympics.Athletics Kenya President Jackson Tuwei(R)The Athletics Kenya (AK) focus is on weeding out drug cheats, as the body fights to change the tainted image of the country following a series of failed drug tests.According to Athletics Kenya President Jack Tuwei, athletes seeking to represent the country will have to agree to provide three out-of-competition dope test results and a similar number during competition.As part of efforts to further crackdown and enforce the rules,  AK will also not include athletes who fail dope test in any national team going for the Olympic Games or world championships even if the dopers have been cleared and served their mandatory suspension“We have very good talent, but they are being wasted by unscrupulous agents offering them dope,” Tuwei said in Nairobi, when he presided over the opening sensitization conference against doping.Kenya has had over 50 cases of positive dope tests in the last six years, which has triggered the International Association of Athletics Federations (IAAF) to place it in category A, alongside Ethiopia, Ukraine and Venezuela of countries likely to have its athletes cheat.This means that Kenya runners are subjected to intense and frequent test, especially prior to the global championships.Tuwei said the issue, if left unchecked, could snowball and taint the country’s image, long known its prowess in distance running.“There is no need to have a cheat running in national colors bringing ridicule to our country. We will stick to athletes that agree to run and win clean,” Tuwei stressed.New York marathon champion Mary Keitany asked young athletes to be careful who they sign up with as their coach.Keitany warned, many coaches are lustful for quick rewards and may push them to cheat in order to win international accolades.“Run clean and always train hard. That is the simplest way to win and remain in the sport for long. Doping is harmful to your body and will always expose you. Once caught, your career will be gone,” said Keitany.Related Ethiopia begins preparations for the 2015 World Athletics Championships IAAF Athletics World Championships 2015: The night for African Athletescenter_img World Athletics Championship last_img read more

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DFA donates to women’s football

first_img Share Tweet 231 Views   no discussions LocalNewsSports DFA donates to women’s football by: – September 15, 2014 Sharecenter_img Share Sharing is caring! President of DFA Glen Ettiene handing over one of the balls to a team member.The Dominica Football Association (DFA) has donated football kits to all senior women teams around the island. Each of the seven teams received a presentation of 20 uniforms, playing boots, hoses, shin guards, and balls on Saturday September 13, 2014 at the Football House in Bath Estate. The donation is said to be worth in the excess of sixty-three thousand dollars ($63,000.00).The seven teams who received donations are New India Goodwill Runners, New Generation Sports Club, Dive Dominica Harlem United, Wood City Strikers, Mahaut Soca Strikets, South East Stars, and West Coast Jaguars.DFA president, Glen Etienne said that the donation is very important and is a significant achievement of the Association.“This ceremony is a milestone achievement for us in the Dominica Football Association and the entire footballing fraternity especially women’s Football”.“The presentation that we are about to make is a clear demonstration of our continuing interest in the development of women’s football on the island,” Mr Etienne said.He added that women’s football is on a high and as such resources have been committed towards its development and to ensure that more young girls gravitate towards football.“The football kits, which is a significant investment, is designed to aid you in your preparation for the 2014/2015 season”. “Today is a clear manifestation that we have listened and we have responded in a big way,” Mr Etienne stated and indicated that the presentation is one aspect of the DFA’s “big plans” for women’s football.“As the new season kicks off on the 24th of September, give it your all, play the game with passion, a passion that will ensure success”. Meanwhile, DFA treasurer, Phillip White informed that the value of the kits presented is $63,759.12. “Women football will be getting in the excess of two hundred thousand dollars for this season. We see this as very important because next year we will have the women’s Olympic qualifiers,” Mr White said and urged the women to make good use of the uniforms during the leagues.Manager of the Senior Women’s team, Sabrina Bully thanked the DFA for the contribution which she described as “a timely and kind gesture and a perfect way to kick off the 2014/2015 women’s football season”.“I am hopeful that the teams utilize this gift to the fullest, like Mr White was saying, it is worth a lot of money, it is an investment and it shows some commitment in terms of the long term and short term of women’s football here in Dominica”.Miss Bully is hoping that it will be the first of many gestures to come because she believes that women’s football does need the emphasis. Dominica Vibes Newslast_img read more

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