Sports briefs

first_imgWomen top Northeastern, 3-1, in Beanpot semifinalsIn women????s Beanpot action, junior Jenny Brine tallied a pair of goals to pace the No. 1 Crimson to a 3-1 victory over the Huskies on Tuesday night (Feb. 5) at BU’s Walter Brown Arena. Down 1-0 just 42 seconds into the contest, Harvard (20-1-0) battled back with consecutive goals in the first and second periods, courtesy of Brine. Harvard’s Sarah Vaillancourt ’09 added an insurance tally late in the final stanza to pick up her team-leading 13th goal.The Crimson will look to capture its 12th Beanpot championship against host BU on Feb. 12 at 8 p.m.Icers break 10-year drought, set to compete for ’PotPaul Dufault ’08, Mike Taylor ’08, and Doug Rogers ’10 each tallied a goal in the opening seven minutes of play to lift the Harvard men’s hockey team past No. 14 Northeastern, 3-1, in the opening round of the 56th annual Beanpot this past Monday (Feb. 4) at TD Banknorth Garden. With the win, Harvard (8-10-3 overall) advances to the championship game (set for Feb. 11 at the Garden) against No. 9 Boston College. The Crimson program last competed for the title in 1998.Skiers capture ninth at UV carnival in Stowe, Vt.The Harvard men’s and women’s alpine and Nordic ski teams placed ninth out of 11 schools at the University of Vermont Winter Carnival in Stowe, Vt., this past Feb. 1-2. Battling snow showers and icy conditions, the women’s Nordic team posted the program’s strongest finish of the weekend with a seventh-place effort in the freestyle.last_img read more

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Show Some Skin’ opens auditions for 2014 show

first_img“Show Some Skin”, a show comprised of monologue performances that discuss issues such as race, gender and sexuality, will begin auditions today for the Feb. 2014 performances, show director Clarissa Schwab, said. The audition process is simple, and everyone is invited to participate, Schwab said. “All we look for in actors is open-mindedness,” she said. “If you are closed-minded at all especially with these kinds of stories, it’s just not going to work out. You have to be open-minded to accept their story, let that reflect, and let that simmer and marinate then present it for everyone to see.” Show Some Skin, now in its third year, was founded in Spring 2012 by Edith Cho, JeeSeun Choi and Hien Luu to spark a conversation about race relations at Notre Dame, according to the show’s website, ndshowsomeskin.com. Schwab said this year’s show will be “the biggest yet.” In previous years, the performances were held in the Carey Auditorium, but this year the show will be held on the main state of the DeBartolo Performing Arts Center, she said. “The show started out pretty small, then it got a little bigger,” Schwab said. “Now we just want to really have a presence on this campus. To be on the main stage, it takes the show to a new level.” While the show is still more than two months away, Schwab said the “Show Some Skin” team started gearing up for the show this summer. “We have been working hard since the summer,” Schwab said. “We have all the stories we want to say. If there are no actors to say them, there is not going to be a show.” Schwab said the 2014 show is subtitled “Be Bold,” and said the name derives from the 2013 performance. “In last year’s show, there was a monologue presented by a girl who invited the audience to share their story and be bold,” Schwab said. “She shared all these things about herself and said ‘Now it’s your turn, so you go ahead, you share what you want the world to know or what you’re afraid to say.’” According to Schwab, the performance by actors is based on anonymous stories submitted by students, faculty and even South Bend residents. “Although we want people to be bold and stand up, a lot of times it’s hard for people to actually tell their story,” she said. “We didn’t want anyone to back out from having to tell the story just because they have to give a name.” Schwab said what makes Show Some Skin exciting is the wide range of topics on which it sheds light. “It’s a roller coaster. Everything you can expect, it’s there,” she said. “‘Show Some Skin’ has it all.” According to the Facebook page, the show’s acting auditions will be held on Friday and Saturday from 1 p.m. to 3 p.m. and on Sunday from 6:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. in Carey Auditorium in Hesburgh Library. Contact Paul Kim at pkim6@nd.edulast_img read more

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Student senate discusses academic honor code

first_imgIn this week’s session of the Notre Dame student senate, Hugh Page, dean of the First Year of Studies and vice president and associate provost for undergraduate affairs, took the floor with student members of the University Code of Honor Committee to discuss the ongoing review of the Academic Code of Honor.“One of our goals is to try and do a fairly thorough rewriting of the Honor Code but before we do that we figured that it was really important for us to solicit feedback from as wide a cross section of students as we can, and also to solicit feedback from faculty,” Page said.Page spoke of the student survey that was distributed this past fall as well as a faculty survey, the results of both indicating the need for further conversation among the entire academic community, which the committee plans to facilitate through a series of focus groups. The members of the senate broke into smaller committees to discuss what kinds of questions would be most relevant in the discussions of the upcoming focus groups.Committee member Nate McKeon, a senior, led discussion about the clarity of the Code of Honor.“How clear is [the Code] in defining actual academic dishonesty, like, you know, if you’re going into an assignment or an exam, do you have a good grasp on what academic dishonesty is?” McKeon asked.Students shared a common concern in deciphering the grey areas of academic dishonesty. All agreed that while copying the answers of another student on a final exam is an obvious violation of the Honor Code, there is more ethical ambiguity in collaborating on homework assignments, projects and small quizzes.Sophomore Dillon Hall senator Tim O’Connell said further obscurity arises when considering the distinct styles of learning and teaching in different fields of study and said a large part of the responsibility falls on the professors to clearly delineate their expectations.“We as a group thought it was more of the professor’s job to kind of outline,” O’Connell said. “[In engineering] we think there’s a lot of not so much of a grey area on the homework because professors are usually, ‘Hey, work on the homework together just turn in your own,’ and then for tests it’s pretty obvious, just do your own. … We had some kids in Arts and Letters and Mendoza who thought it was kind of more of a grey area ’cause they have a lot more, kind of multiple choice, Sakai quizzes.”In fact, whether the professors should claim responsibility in clarifying their interpretations of the Code or the students should be expected to apply the code in a “one size fits all” mentality was a popular point of discussion. McGlinn senator, sophomore Maria Palazzolo, said her group was surprised to learn the professors did not share their own opinions on the code. “We said we think it’s more of the professor’s job to say for the specific class, because it’s different for each class what they would want or how it works,” Palazzolo said. “ … But Natasha, who facilitated the discussion, said that the professors think it’s the student’s job. So it’s a miscommunication that needs to be fixed.”Additionally, the ease of obtaining increasingly common online resources further complicates the issue of cheating, as sophomore and Cavanaugh Hall senator Brittany Benninger said.“We talked about online resources, if you will, so like those sites where you can buy tests … how does that play into the new Honor Code?” Benninger said.Tags: academic honor code, academics, cheating, Senatelast_img read more

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Texas passed bills to combat patient confusion and price gouging in ERs

first_imgSee also: Key bills passed in Texas Legislature “We sometimes get caught into that battle because the public just sees the word, ‘freestanding ER’ and assumes it’s us,” Sandel said. “And so we made it very clear this legislative session. Every bill that was out there, if you were going to legislate the independent freestanding ER, then you must legislate the hospital-based freestanding ER.”Critics of the bill were also concerned that the disclosure could lead to patients not going through with life-saving treatments because of the potential cost. Sandel said it’s still a concern, but disclosures can be given after the procedure and there’s no penalty if patients choose not to sign it.Mark Hollis, a spokesperson for AARP Texas said the organization has been concerned about the effect of surprise medical bills – many of which come from freestanding emergency rooms. He said the bills that passed through the Legislature will protect Texans from “unexpected and exuberant charges” and make it clearer to consumers if a freestanding emergency room is in network.“As we’ve done research into surprise medical bills, we came to understand that many people were being impacted with surprise medical bills from having visited a freestanding emergency room,” Hollis said.In a 2018 survey of freestanding emergency rooms across the state, AARP Texas reported 77% of freestanding emergency rooms said they “take” or “accept” insurance on their website but were out-of-network for all major health plans. The bill strictly addresses this issue, prohibiting any sort of misleading advertising in the facility and online.Oliverson’s bill also adds freestanding emergency rooms to a list of state healthcare facilities that have to report data to the Texas Department of State Health Services such as how much patients are charged and how many patients are insured. The reporting is dependent on funding from the Legislature, which set aside over $800,000 for data collection in its next two-year budget.Lawmakers also took up the alleged issue of “price gouging” at freestanding emergency rooms. House Bill 1941 by state Rep. Dade Phelan, R-Beaumont, will allow the Texas attorney general to take action against freestanding emergency rooms that charge “unconscionable” rates, which the bill defines as prices that are 200% more than the average hospital charge for a similar treatment.Phelan said the bill would go after the “bad actors” in the freestanding emergency room field that take advantage of Texans in dire situations.“As the number of freestanding ERs have increased in Texas, the complaints from constituents about charges have also increased,” Phelan said at a hearing of the House Business and Industry Committee in April. “Many consumers face large bills from freestanding emergency rooms and certain facilities must be held accountable.”The bill initially received pushback by some who argued the 200% threshold wasn’t restrictive enough. Phelan said he had to set the bar somewhere. It passed through the House unanimously and the Senate in a 30-1 vote. State Sen. Charles Schwertner, R-Georgetown was the only senator to vote against it.Both bills are now awaiting action by the governor, who can sign them, veto them or let them become law without his signature. If neither bill is vetoed, they will take effect September 1.However, not all bills regulating freestanding emergency rooms made it across the finish line. House Bill 1832 by state Rep. Julie Johnson D-Carrollton, sailed out of the House but died in the Senate. It would have prevented insurance companies from retroactively determining an emergency procedure does not qualify as an emergency and could result in surprise medical bills.Sandel, board president of TAFEC, said the bill would have created “much-needed patient protections.”“There is more work ahead to ensure patient access to ER care without health plan interference,” Sandel said. “We remain committed to that work.”But the insurance industry, which opposed the bill, viewed it as making it easier for freestanding emergency rooms to overcharge for simple services.Jamie Dudensing, head of the Texas Association of Health Plans, said the bills passed this session will allow consumers to make better decisions for themselves.“These facilities have demonstrated a clear pattern of withholding important information or lying to patients regarding their network status, then price-gouging them for astronomical amounts after providing care,” Dudensing said in a statement. “We applaud the Texas Legislature for holding freestanding ERs accountable and equipping consumers with the information they need to make better decisions for themselves and their families.”Disclosure: The Texas Association of Freestanding Emergency Centers, the Texas Association of Health Plans and AARP Texas have been financial supporters of The Texas Tribune, a nonprofit, nonpartisan news organization that is funded in part by donations from members, foundations and corporate sponsors. Financial supporters play no role in the Tribune’s journalism. The Texas Tribune is a nonpartisan, nonprofit media organization that informs Texans — and engages with them – about public policy, politics, government and statewide issues. Freestanding emergency rooms are already required to display the health plans they accept on signs around the facility, per state legislation passed in 2017. However, some say the signs can be confusing and include logos of health plans that the facility doesn’t accept. When state Rep. Tom Oliverson R-Cypress, laid out his bill in the House Public Health committee, he said he had trouble on a recent visit to a freestanding emergency room, where the staff initially told him they took his insurance. A few minutes later, they let him know the facility was out-of-network with his health plan and his visit wouldn’t be covered.“In an emergency situation, patients should not be expected to have previously researched and figured out if a facility is in-network,” Oliverson said. “We think that this information should be provided upfront in an unambiguous format.”Oliverson said his bill, House Bill 2041, requires a freestanding emergency rooms to give patients a printed-out disclosure in English and Spanish that lists the in-network health plans and the average price a patient may be charged for a procedure, including facility fees. Patients can choose whether to sign it. Under the bill, freestanding emergency rooms will also be barred from advertising that it “takes” or “accepts” certain insurers or health plans if the facility is not an in-network provider.The disclosures will be required for both independent and hospital-affiliated freestanding emergency rooms. The Texas Association of Freestanding Emergency Centers, a trade organization for independent emergency rooms, was originally against the bill. Rhonda Sandel, board president of TAFEC, said the organization changed its position after learning hospital-affiliated freestanding emergency rooms would also have to comply. She said that was important because independent facilities can sometimes get a bad reputation for actions by hospital-based facilities. Ten years ago, Texas became the first state to allow licenses for independent freestanding emergency rooms. Since then, just over 200 have opened their doors around Texas, according to state data. The facilities go by names like First Choice Emergency Room and Legacy Emergency Room. They resemble urgent care clinics but some regularly charge hospital emergency room prices.State lawmakers considered several bills this session aimed at addressing complaints that some freestanding emergency rooms overcharge patients and are not clear with consumers regarding pricing or insurance coverage.One bill awaiting action by the governor will require freestanding emergency rooms to clearly disclose the in-network health plans they accept and the fees patients may be charged. By Elizabeth ByrneThe Texas Tribunetexastribune.orglast_img read more

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Odds & Ends: Judith Light, Cherry Jones Among Stars Set for Homebound Project & More

first_img Here’s a quick roundup of stories you might have missed recently.Judith Light Among Participants in the Homebound ProjectThe Homebound Project, an independent theater initiative benefiting hungry children affected by the coronavirus crisis, will return from July 15 through July 19. To date, the online project has raised over $88,000 for No Kid Hungry. The playwrights in the fourth edition of the Homebound Project have been given the prompt of “promise.” Judith Light is set to appear in a work by Jon Robin Baitz, directed by Leigh Silverman. Cherry Jones will appear in a piece by Erin Courtney that will be directed by Jenna Worsham. Other participants include Santino Fontana in a work by Emily Zemba; Amber Tamblyn in a work by Halley Feiffer; Sue Jean Kim in a work by Leslye Headland, directed by Annie Tippe; Tommy Dorfman in a work by Diana Oh, directed by Lena Dunham; and more. View-at-home tickets are on sale here and begin at a donation level of $10. Complimentary viewings for first responders and essential workers have been made possible by an anonymous donor.David Hyde Pierce & More Set for Guthrie Theater Virtual BenefitOn August 1 at 7PM CDT (8PM ET), the Guthrie Theater will host a virtual benefit event. There will be appearances from Broadway luminaries, including Tony winners David Hyde Pierce, Mark Rylance and Santino Fontana. Those who support this event will ensure that the Guthrie is able to reopen in the wake of the coronavirus crisis. To lend a hand and register for the online event, head here.50th Annual Godspell Concert to Raise Money for CharitiesWest End stars will unite for a 50th anniversary concert celebration of Godspell. Ruthie Henshall and Darren Day will reprise their roles from the 1993 cast recording. The company will also include Sam Tutty, Ria Jones, Jenna Russell, Jodie Steele, Danyl Johnson, Jenny Fitzpatrick, Natalie Green, John Barr, Sally Ann Triplett, Gerard McCarthy, Alison Jiear, Shekinah McFarlane and Lucy Williamson. The concert, which will benefit the charities Hope Mill Theatre, Acting For Others and National AIDS Trust, will be available to view on August 27, 28 and 29. For details regarding tickets, head here.John Mulaney to Create Two New Sack Lunch Bunch SpecialsEmmy winner and Broadway alum John Mulaney will team up with Comedy Central to produce two brand new Sack Lunch Bunch specials. The first installment of the musical comedy series aired on Netflix in December of 2019. In addition to its talented kid cast, which featured Mrs. Doubtfire’s Jake Ryan Flynn, John Mulaney & the Sack Lunch Bunch also included appearances from Annaleigh Ashford, André De Shields, Jake Gyllenhaal, Richard Kind and Shereen Pimentel.  Judith Light(Photo: Emilio Madrid) View Comments Star Files Judith Lightlast_img read more

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QMotion Now Has Giant-Sized Roller Shades

first_imgTo accommodate the larger windows of today’s open-concept designs, Legrand introduces its new QMotion Wider Qadvanced Shades. Showing for the first time at CEDIA Expo 2019 in Booth 905, QMotion says that its Wider Qadvanced Shades are the only motorized shades on the market, hard-wired or battery-operated, available in sizes as large as 13 feet wide by 15 feet tall in select fabric options.The growing preference for open-concept home designs featuring larger windows that grant greater access to natural daylight is in turn increasing the demand for automated shading systems to help control that natural light indoors. However, many homeowners are struggling to find motorized shading systems on the market that fit their ultra-large windows. In response, QMotion has expanded its Qadvanced Roller Shade offering in larger sizes.Available in a wide range of colors, Wider Qadvanced Shades feature virtually soundless operation in hard-wired or battery-operated versions and a patented design that utilizes torsion springs to reduce energy consumption. Simple to install, the hard-wired models use standard Cat5e/Cat6 cables for both power and communication and feature a Zigbee HA 1.2 radio inside the motor, eliminating the need for extra shade motor bridge devices. The battery-operated family of solutions uses only internal batteries, eliminating the problem ofhiding external battery packs or wires. Like all the models found in QMotion’s automated roller shade lineup, Wider Qadvanced Shades can be controlled via remote, mobile device, or the company’s exclusive manual override feature that prevents stripping the motor during adjustments.Legrand’s QMotion Wider Qadvanced Shades are shipping and are here.last_img read more

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JAEC offers ’employment application’ for candidates running for judgeships

first_imgJAEC offers ’employment application’ for candidates running for judgeships JAEC offers ‘employment application’ for candidates running for judgeships Senior EditorAn “employment application” for trial court judge candidates, intended to help educate voters, has been approved by the Bar’s Judicial Administration and Evaluation Committee.Committee members heralded the questionnaire — which, if approved by the Bar Board of Governors,could be distributed to judicial candidates up for election this fall — as a major accomplishment but also said they want to find more ways to educate the public about judicial candidates and the judicial system.“We’re in the information age; we can’t deny it,” said committee member and 10th Circuit Judge John Stargel. “There’s a vacuum [of information about judicial candidates] and somebody is going to fill it. It’s up to us to provide information that is credible.“If there is not a platform for that to occur, someone will provide a platform,” he added, noting interest groups and those with an ax to grind may inject their own predisposed viewpoints. “When it comes to the public’s perception of who’s a good judge, there will be information provided and if we don’t provide information, someone else will.”The committee met January 17 during the Bar’s Midyear Meeting in Miami to put the finishing touches on what it calls the Judicial Candidate Voluntary Self-Disclosure Statement.Most were technical changes; however, much of the discussion focused on an essay-type question to be asked of judges and candidates and how the question should be phrased. Some preliminary drafts of the query asked candidates to explain their judicial philosophies. Original drafts of the questionnaire concentrated on collecting factual information, but the Bar’s Citizens Forum said the questionnaire should allow candidates and judges to say something about themselves.Committee members said they were concerned a question regarding candidates’ judicial philosophy could encourage candidates to pander to specific interest groups or even lead them to make statements which violate the judicial canons, resulting in a Judicial Qualifications Commission investigationIf asked about judicial philosophy, “All they’re going to say is, ‘I’m going to follow the law,’” said committee member Michael Feiler. “The better question is, ‘Why do you think you would be a good judge for the state of Florida?’”Bar Board of Governors member Jennifer Coberly, who is liaison to the committee and sits on the Citizens Forum, said most forum members were not wedded to specifically seeking judicial philosophy, but rather wanted to elicit information about why candidates wanted to be on the bench.The committee voted for the last question on the form to read, “In 100 words or less, without discussing any particular issue which may come before you if you become a judge, explain why you believe you would be a good judge.”Other questions ask candidates about their trial, mediation, and arbitration experience in some detail; their bench experience if an incumbent judge; public service work including pro bono and military service; disciplinary history including Bar sanctions, military courts martial and discharge status, and JQC investigations; education history; employment history; honors; practice areas; and other details.Committee members agreed the Bar should not vet the information for accuracy, saying the media and any electoral opponents will do that. They also said any material misrepresentation could open up a successful candidate for a JQC investigation.The method of distribution to voters was not determined. Committee members suggested that compilations of the questionnaires could be put in pamphlets and distributed to voters, and copies of the completed forms could be distributed to local media.Aside from the form, the committee also approved a five-paragraph statement explaining the purpose of the Judicial Candidate Voluntary Self-Disclosure Statement. In past meetings, committee members have likened the form to an employment application submitted to voters in which candidates explain their qualifications and abilities.The overview statement, in part, expands the application by saying, “The self-disclosure statement was developed to provide a means by which the public could gather information about their judicial candidates. It came to the attention of the Bar that voters felt they did not have sufficient information to make educated decisions on judicial candidates.”The form and statement now go to the Bar Board of Governors for review.After approving those documents, committee members launched into a discussion of what else could be done, saying that while the form is a good step, the public will want more information. Some members noted recent U.S. Supreme Court decisions allowing judicial candidates to make wide-ranging statements and even to inject overtly partisan politics into judicial races.Committee member Tom Warner noted the U.S. Supreme Court recently overturned a lower court ruling and approved the New York state method of nominating its trial court judges at statewide partisan conventions.The group said it is important for the Bar to recognize that legal challenges could be coming to the judicial canons’ restrictions on what judicial candidates can say, including the prohibition about commenting on issues likely to come before them on the bench. Special interest groups, they also said, will try to use judicial elections either to push candidates reflecting their views or to get candidates to commit themselves on some issues.“We have an ability. . . to disseminate information and make sure the public understands and, therefore, is able to make an informed decision,” Feiler said. “If you don’t get out and define the issues, your enemies will go out and do it for you, and then you start out two touchdowns down.”Committee members reached no conclusions about additional steps, but agreed to continue the discussion at future meetings. February 15, 2008 Gary Blankenship Senior Editor Regular Newslast_img read more

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College students faced upsurge in anxiety, stress, and poor sleep the day after the 2016 election

first_imgEmail The researchers had 85 university students take a daily survey regarding their mood, stress, and mental health before and after the 2016 election. “We tracked daily psychological health for two weeks, starting a few days before the election, and concluding a few weeks after the election,” Roche explained.He and his colleague, Nicholas C. Jacobson, observed a spike in negative emotions and stress along with a drop in sleep quality the day after the election. The participants also reported an upsurge of race, gender, or age discrimination.“The main result was that students reported signs of negative emotions (anxiety, anger, fear) and other aspects of worsening psychological health (stress, poor sleep quality, marginalization, experiencing discrimination) on the day following the election,” Roche told PsyPost. “Some of these reactions only lasted for a day, while others appeared to be longer lasting (anger, fear, marginalization).”“This information can help counseling centers provide help for students, directing resources to address the difficulties that appear longer lasting. It may also help universities better understand their students so they can assist students in having productive reactions to the election (whether their candidate won or lost). This is especially important as many college students will be first time voters.”A similar study, published in the journal Psychoneuroendocrinology, found an overall increase in negative moods among university students in the run-up to the election, which peaked on Election Day.But Roche admitted his study has some limitations.“The small sample size (less than 100 students) limits generalizability, and we also didn’t know political affiliation which may have had a role to play in student reactions,” he said. “These results apply to the 2016 presidential election, but it is possible that one would find these same results for any presidential election. Future research is needed to see if these reactions were typical or unique to the 2016 presidential election.”“This research is innovative because most political research we are aware of does not directly measure change over time within a person. For instance, most polls sample new people each day, rather than asking someone’s opinion across multiple occasions,” Roche added.“This is important because if an approval rating moves from 40% to 30%, we have no idea whether people are changing their minds, or if the people who agreed to respond to a poll that day happened to have a less approving view of the elected official. The potential of our research design (sampling individuals over time) can allow us to answer questions about change more directly. This has the potential to improve the predictive power of polling data, which has been recently questioned for its validity.”The study was titled: “Elections Have Consequences for Student Mental Health: An Accidental Daily Diary Study”. Share University students experienced a significant increase in anger, fear, marginalization, and stress on the day after the 2016 election, according to a new study published in Psychological Reports. Their sleep quality also suffered.“I first became interested in this topic after hearing how strongly students were reacting to the 2016 presidential election results in the classes I teach (some positive, some negative),” said Michael J. Roche of Penn State Altoona, the corresponding author of the study.“I realized that my research study (which tracked daily psychological health for two weeks) happened to begin just before the election, giving us an opportunity to explore the impact to psychological health in a way that had never been done before.” LinkedIncenter_img Pinterest Share on Facebook Share on Twitterlast_img read more

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Saudi Arabia, UAE report more MERS cases

first_imgSaudi Arabia’s health ministry said today the Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV) has sickened one more person and that another patient has died from the disease, a day after neighboring United Arab Emirates (UAE) announced sparse details about two more cases there.Saudi Arabian casesThe latest patient to fall ill with the virus in Saudi Arabia is a 49-year-old man, a Saudi citizen from Hafoof, according to a health ministry (MOH) statement. It said he is not a health worker, has an underlying medical condition, and showed symptoms from his infection. He is receiving care in a regular hospital ward.The city of Hafoof is in Saudi Arabia’s Eastern province.Meanwhile, the patient who died is a 70-year-old man from Taif, a city located in western Saudi Arabia, about 46 miles east of Mecca. His illness appears to have been first announced on Jul 7. A case-patient matching the man’s description was hospitalized in an intensive care unit.The latest developments boost the number of MERS-CoV infections in Saudi Arabia to 721 and its death toll to 295. Currently, 39 people are being treated for their illnesses.Sketchy details from UAEYesterday, the UAE’s health ministry announced two new MERS-CoV cases but shared few details other than that they were detected in Abu Dhabi and the case-patients are in stable condition and receiving care.They are the first cases to be announced by the UAE since the middle of June. If confirmed by the World Health Organization (WHO), they would lift the country’s case count to 71, according to a list kept by FluTrackers, an infectious disease news message board. The country has reported at least 7 deaths.WHO clarification on risk of disease spreadIn other developments, the WHO today e-mailed a statement to journalists clarifying a news portrayal of the MERS-CoV risk to Asia. WHO said it met with a group of journalists in Manila earlier today to discuss ongoing infectious disease issues, during which it fielded a question about the risk of MERS-CoV spread in Asia.One widely circulated story said MERS-CoV virus was unlikely to spread to the Asia region.The WHO said in its e-mail statement that the WHO can’t predict how MERS-CoV will spread, because it’s still not known how the virus spreads to people. “Therefore, it is important that health authorities stay vigilant,” it said, noting that at least 10 countries have reported infections in returning travelers.WHO said global understanding of the disease continues to evolve and that all countries should be alert for acute respiratory infections and investigate any unusual patterns.So far the WHO has received reports of 827 lab-confirmed cases, along with 287 deaths, according to the statement.See also:Jul 10 MOH statementJul 9 UAE health authority statementFluTrackers MERS-CoV human case listlast_img read more

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Paul Davis Does Pechefsky

first_imgThe latest of Paul Davis’s iconic posters is a rendering of congressional candidate David Pechefsky.David Pechefsky’s campaign poster is already a winner; all that’s left for the candidate to do is win a seat in the U.S. Congress.Pechefsky is one of five Democrats locked in a primary battle for the right to take on the incumbent Lee Zeldin.The renowned artist Paul Davis, who has created iconic images of some of the most prominent political and cultural figures of our time, was recently inspired to support the candidacy of Pechefsky, and donated a campaign poster to the cause.“I think he’s the best guy,” Davis said in an interview this week. “He’s got a lot of work to do, but it helps with name recognition.”Davis’s work is legendary, featured on iconic posters of Kevin Kline as Hamlet, Meryl Streep, and his art was also used for the play For Colored Girls — his art was used for the record and the movie as well as the play. Other enduring classic theater posters include those for The Goodbye Girl and The Threepenny Opera.He’s done political posters before, dating back to George McGovern.“After getting to know David, it became clear that he is a candidate who stands apart. I wanted to create a poster to express the sense of hope he inspires in me and others, especially the many young people who have been energized by his campaign,” Davis said. “They seem to sense, as I do, that as a congressman David would represent all the people of this community, especially working families whose needs are so often overlooked.”Pechefsky said he was surprised and honored when Davis offered to create a poster for his campaign. “I can think of no more profound endorsement than having Paul Davis express his support for me through his art,” he added.“I believe the work captures the shared aspiration Paul and I have for a better, fairer country, where all are treated with dignity and respect, and where we do what is needed to preserve our planet for future generations. I hope, as a candidate and as a member of Congress, to repay, at least in some measure, Paul’s faith in me,” the candidate said.Pechefsky was raised in Patchogue and has devoted his life to public service, both at home and abroad. As a longtime staffer for the NYC Council, he helped secure millions of dollars for youth, health, senior, and housing programs. As a consultant for the National Democratic Institute, he worked from 2010 to 2013 on projects designed to build democratic institutions in war torn nations, including Somalia, Liberia, and Iraq.Pechefsky returned home to Long Island to use that wide-ranging experience for the people of this district, he said. The candidate said he is committed to the vision of an inclusive, equal, and just society, where every person has a chance for a decent life. If elected to Congress, he said he will fight for a bold agenda, addressing income inequality, universal health care, affordable housing, rebuilding our infrastructure, and the challenges of climate change.The other congressional candidates include Suffolk County Legislator Kate Browning of Shirley; Elaine DiMasi of Ronkonkoma, who worked as a Brookhaven National Laboratory physicist; Perry Gershon, a businessman who has worked in commercial real estate finance and lives in East Hampton; and Vivian Viloria-Fisher of Setauket, who served as a county legislator until she reached her term limit in 2011.rmurphy@indyeastend.com Sharelast_img read more

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