Wounded Warrior Amputee Softball Game raises $30,000

first_imgThe Vermont Lake Monsters are pleased to announce that $ 30,000 has been raised for the Wounded Warrior Amputee Softball Team, as part of the June 29 event at Centennial Field.  The Wounded Warrior Amputee Softball Team, made up of Veterans and Active-Duty Soldiers and Marines who have lost a limb(s) in post 9/11 combat, tour nationally to raise awareness of the sacrifices of these brave soldiers, while giving communities across our great country an opportunity to show their support of our true heroes. ‘It was an honor to assist in the creation of the Burlington, Vermont, event,’says Vermont Lake Monsters Vice President Kyle Bostwick.  ‘The outpouring of support in both preparation and participation of this event, that showcases the sacrifices that these soldiers have made should make us all be proud to be a part of our community.’Monies for the Wounded Warrior Amputee Softball Team were raised through a two day event that was highlighted by an exhibition softball game featuring former Major League Pitchers Bill ‘Spaceman’Lee and Len Whitehouse, Burlington Police Chief Michael Schirling, Silver Screen Actor and Vermont resident Luis Guzman, actor, producer, and writer Rusty ‘The Logger’ Dewees, country music star Jamie Lee Thurston, and Burlington Mayor Miro Weinberger. In addition substantial revenues for the event were raised through generous donations by The Pizzagalli Foundation, Jolley Associates, Farrell Distributing, Yankee Medical, Select Design, Lake Champlain Cruises, and REM Development.A ceremonial check presentation will occur today with WWAST manager David Van Sleet in attendance, July 29th, prior to the Vermont Lake Monsters home game against the Lowell Spinners at Centennial Field at 7:05PM.www.vermontlakemonsters.com(link is external) or www.woundedwarrioramputeesoftballteam.org(link is external)last_img read more

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Sterling College ranked top college farm in Vermont

first_imgVermont Business Magazine Agriculture is at the core of Vermont’s economy, and it is an essential part of the environmental stewardship education at Sterling College. That commitment to sustainable agriculture has resulted in Sterling College and its Rian Fried Center for Sustainable Agriculture & Food Systems being ranked as the top college farm in Vermont, and the eleventh college farm nationally, by OnlineCollegePlan.com.The list was compiled in honor of National Farm to School Month in October, a month dedicated to spreading awareness and celebrating the efforts of the farms at participating schools. Other Vermont schools were well represented in the rankings, with Green Mountain College, Middlebury, and the University of Vermont also included.OnlineCollegePlan.com lauded the involvement of students, noting that a fourth of all students work on the farm, gaining hands-on experience managing crops, livestock, and woodlands. Sterling College is the only federally-recognized Work College in the Northeast, where all students, regardless of financial need, work on campus and earn money toward their educational expenses. Students have a variety of jobs to choose from on campus, including farm positions such as Livestock Crew, Forestry Crew, Draft Horse Attendant, and Perennial Planting Specialist.“This ranking is proof that we’re not just studying environmental stewardship and sustainable agriculture on campus: we’re living it every day,” says Dr. Charlotte Rosendahl, Director of the Rian Fried Center for Sustainable Agriculture & Food Systems and faculty in Sustainable Agriculture. “Our farm is a living laboratory to shape a future of ecological agricultural systems—small-scale farms that don’t exacerbate climate change, water scarcity, or pollution.”Sterling College is a leader in sustainable agriculture education, and had one of the first college farms in the country. The farm provides around 20% of the food eaten on campus, leading to accolades from the Real Food Challenge, Sierra magazine, and the Association for the Advancement of Sustainability in Higher Education (AASHE) for Sterling College’s sustainable college dining. The College is the top college in the United States that serves food on campus that is local, sustainable, humane, and fair-trade.This ranking contributes to a remarkable few months in which Sterling College has been included by Sierra magazine in the top 11% of its “America’s Coolest Schools” list, a ranking of the nation’s greenest colleges and universities; was a top performer in the 2016 Sustainable Campus Index by AASHE; and was cited by The Princeton Review as one of the nation’s most environmentally responsible colleges.To see the complete listing, visit http://www.onlinecollegeplan.com/college-farms/(link is external). For more information about the Sterling College farm, visit http://www.sterlingcollege.edu/life-at-sterling/the-farm/(link is external)STERLING COLLEGEFounded in 1958 in Craftsbury Common, Vermont, Sterling College is the leading voice in higher education for environmental stewardship. The College was among the first colleges in the United States to focus on sustainability through academic majors in Ecology, Environmental Humanities, Sustainable Agriculture & Food Systems, and Outdoor Education. Sterling College is accredited by the New England Association of Schools and Colleges and is one of only eight federally recognized Work Colleges in the nation.Source: November 10, 2016 • Craftsbury Common, VT • Sterling Collegelast_img read more

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April 1, 2008 Letters

first_imgCourt Funding Sen. Victor Crist’s statement, as reported in the March 1 News, that the courts might have “intentionally” set themselves up to a position where they would have to close their own doors, just for the purpose of stimulating “panic at home” is disrespectful to those dedicated to public service who often do so for less than can be earned in the private sector. The statement also reflects a misguided notion that justice can be administered like a bakery makes cakes. A cake is baked according to a recipe or it will not be edible. Once funding falls below a certain level, the court will not be able to provide its essential core functions. People will have to take a ticket and wait in line at the courthouse on the days it may be open. Justice delayed is justice denied. Despite the continued loss of funding since Revision 7 to Art. 5, all citizens who walk through the courthouse doors have to be served on court matters such as orders for protection against domestic violence, child support, spousal support, protection of the elderly, protection of children, protection of those suffering from mental illness or drug addiction, protection from those who have broken the laws of the state, and on and on. How can you explain to a needy woman who has received no support from her husband for herself or her children why she has to wait three months or more for 30 minutes of her judge’s time to get a court order for support? The judicial branch should have special priority. The legislature should pay careful attention to the legitimate concerns voiced publicly by Chief Justice Fred Lewis about the severe harm the budget cuts will do to the judicial branch. Taxpayers ought to hear about what the impact will be on their lives. They ought to hear about the court’s likely inability to process their divorce case, their child support case, and their business cases if there is no money to pay enough judges, magistrates, case workers, and support staff to get the work done. Taxpaying voters ought to know which of their elected officials take this potential harm seriously and which think it is a ruse made up to scare people. Certainly the courts have to deal with the reality of economic downturn. However, the budget cuts have a disproportionately heavy impact on the courts. Despite the fact that access to our courts is fundamental to our democratic society and the incredible volume it handles, this branch receives less than 1 percent of the entire state budget. The courts already struggle with not having enough money. If the doors to the courthouse close, it will be due to lack of adequate funding from our elected officials in the legislature. Holly Gayle Gershon Boca RatonAttorney-Client Privilege I read with interest the February 15 News story concerning public lawyers needing stronger attorney-client privilege rules. The article and the attitude of the Bar’s Attorney-Client Task Force was extremely disappointing. Having litigated for and against government for the past 40 years, it is essential that the public be entitled to as much access to public records as possible. If a public attorney has given an honest opinion to their government client, then there should be no problem with that opinion being disclosed once the litigation is complete. The public is entitled to know if government is acting in an honest way. keeping secret records the government may be allowed then to act in a way that is detrimental to the interests of its citizens. The legislature showed tremendous insight in adopting public records laws, which allow the public to review the work of government officials to determine whether they are acting in the citizens’ best interests. There is no reason to prevent discovery of work product of an attorney employed by government, once litigation is complete. There is no reason not to have a transcript of a meeting between government attorneys and their public clients. I see no reason not to allow expert witnesses and others to appear at these meetings. A transcript would disclose whether government acted in good faith. Government is different than private parties and needs to be treated differently. There is no difference between a party obtaining “voluminous” public records during discovery and after the discovery process. A person who is not party to a lawsuit could still request these records. The process for providing the records would still be the same. In reading task force member Marion Radson’s comments, he states, “Erosion of the attorney-client privilege marginalizes the role of the lawyer and the lawyer’s ability to protect liberty and pursue justice.” It is my understanding that the justice being pursued by government should be on behalf of the public; therefore, any effort to limit the public’s right to know exactly how its government acted is actually in derogation of liberty and the pursuit of justice. While there may be some areas of the public records laws that need tweaking, if anything, records and transcripts following litigation should be kept absolutely part of the public records. Unfortunately, in matters such as these those who are fighting for continued public records are many times not part of a concerted effort. We are not government lawyers and therefore aren’t necessarily organized to fight for or against these kinds of issues until they actually come up for consideration by the Bar or the legislature. We need our elected Board of Governors to act on our behalf. Louis Kwall ClearwaterDiversity Picnic Despite a torrential downpour, over 300 guests attended the first ever Central Florida Diversity Picnic, held at Stetson College of Law’s Tampa campus, to celebrate and encourage diversity in the legal community. The impetus behind the idea was the annual minority mentoring picnic that has been held in Miami since 2003. I figured it would be great to hold a similar picnic in Central Florida and to invite minority law students to Tampa who wished to practice. I approached John Kozyak, who developed the concept for the South Florida picnic, about my idea and asked his permission to borrow his concept. Mr. Kozyak indicated that he supported the idea. In the fall, through a collaborative effort of The Tampa Bay Hispanic Bar, the Hillsborough County Bar’s Diversity Committee, the George Edgecomb Bar Association, and the Sarasota County Bar Association’s Diversity Committee, we were able to secure a $5,000 grant from The Florida Bar Foundation to help fund the picnic. The Bar’s Young Lawyers Division also pledged an additional $5,000. After months of preparation and through the hard work of my co-chair for the picnic, Devon Stoney, Michele Revels, and Colleen Pruitt of the Hillsborough County Bar, the members of the Diversity Committee, and many volunteers, the picnic went off without a hitch (except for the weather). Everyone enjoyed the ethnic entertainment, which included African dancers, a bamboo orchestra, and a reggae band. For lunch, picnic-goers had their choice of delicious barbecue or Spanish food, as well as cookies, vegetable crudités, cotton candy, and popcorn. When the rain let up, kids got a chance to play on the bouncy slides, have their faces painted, or have a drawing done by a caricature artist. I would like to thank our sponsors and everyone who helped turn an idea into a successful event. We are already starting to plan next year’s picnic. If you are interested in sponsoring or volunteering for next year’s event, please contact me. United States Magistrate Judge Mary Scriven, who attended the picnic with her husband, Lance Scriven, promises that she will talk to her father, who is a minister, to ensure that we do not have rain for next year’s picnic. I look forward to seeing you in the sunshine in 2009. Luis A. Cabassa TampaADA Training After reading David Petrano’s letter in the March 1 edition of the News, I was stunned. He calls the tragic events at the Hillsborough County Jail “state-sponsored disability-bashing.” The terrible actions of that individual were certainly not encouraged or sanctioned by the sheriff’s department. According to Mr. Petrano’s logic, any state employee who commits a crime on the job would be “state-sponsored” as well, despite policies in place or punishments after the incident. The accusation that The Florida Bar “deliberately calculated” discrimination against the disabled is offensive. I find it exceedingly hard to believe that the Board of Governors sits in a room dreaming up ways to make life harder for the disabled. The statement that all attorneys share in the culpability of the attack at the jail erodes the development of our profession as a whole. The Bar does not require training in dependency law. Does this mean that every attorney is responsible for the parent who abuses his child? Of course not. To surrender to this would result in endless CLEs in every niche area with no relevance to a given attorney’s field. Why should the eminent domain specialist or the criminal defense attorney be forced to train in how to file ADA lawsuits? I applaud those who practice in that important field. But do not force me to needlessly engage in training at the expense of worthwhile CLEs that advance my ability to practice in my own area. I understand and share Mr. Petrano’s outrage at the actions of the individual at the jail. But neither the Bar nor the attorneys it governs could possibly be responsible for the illegal actions of an individual. David M. Gould TampaForeclosure Crisis Thank you very much for the News’ focus on foreclosures. Hopefully lawyers across the state will be energized to take interest and get busy learning how to defend foreclosures, and putting their skills to the test in their communities. At Jacksonville Area Legal Aid, the success of a case for a family facing imminent foreclosure is measured from the first day that work begins to maintain the status of homeownership. The case numbers that appear in the March 1 article represent the combined hard work of every employee of the consumer unit at JALA. Also, Wachovia only accounted for 100 of the foreclosure starts in Jacksonville from January — October 2007. The top 10 foreclosers were: Deutsche Bank National Association at 675; Wells Fargo Bank National Association at 557; US Bank National Association at 549; Bank of New York at 360; HSBC Bank at 238; JP Morgan Chase Bank at 213; LaSalle Bank at 134; Citimortgage at 129; Wachovia Bank at 100 and GMAC at 93. These banks and formidable institutions need to focus their goodwill and funding on the communities devastated by foreclosures and reach out locally to prevent foreclosures and to stomp out predatory mortgage lending and servicing. April Charney Jacksonville Area Legal Aid There are lawyers and nonlawyers who could do much to help in the home foreclosure crisis gripping Florida and choking the dockets of our court system. They are mediators. If the circuit court judiciary would get together and order mediation of foreclosures within 30 days of filing instead of at the other end of the process, many of these cases could be resolved. There are scores of certified circuit civil mediators who would serve at substantially reduced rates if these cases were set in numbers and at times that would lend themselves to prompt attention. The requirement that a person representing the owner of the mortgage be present at mediation would eliminate the nonpersonal, out-sourced debt collector problem that seems to block some meaningful effort to work-out a nonforeclosure solution. Settlement rates are in the neighborhood of 75 percent for most court-ordered mediated matters; anything close to that could make a big difference for the industry and the court system. Jim Crowder Miami In response to the March 1 News story concerning Alex Sink, Florida’s chief financial officer, and her request for more lawyers to be involved in the pro bono area of mortgage foreclosures and request for more attorneys to consider public service, I suggest Ms. Sink wake up and smell the coffee. If she thinks a salary for an attorney of $130,000 per year, who also undoubtedly receives medical insurance, disability benefits if needed, and a vested retirement plan, is not enough to raise a family, she has no clue what is going on with Floridians whose homes are being foreclosed. As a sole practitioner, I have and continue to provide pro bono in both state and bankruptcy court and I can assure you few, if any, of the people who receive pro bono services and whose homes are being foreclosed are making $130,000 per year with benefits. I have been licensed in this state for 30 years and I continue to be surprised by government officials who are clueless as to the fate of so many Floridians. the way, Aetna Insurance just sent me my premium notice for renewal of my health insurance for my family, which is in excess of $35,000 for one year. At that rate I may need my own pro bono services. James B. Boone Weston April 1, 2008 Letters April 1, 2008 Letterscenter_img Letterslast_img read more

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U.S. District Court, Southern District of Florida – New Electronic Filing Requirements

first_imgU.S. District Court, Southern District of Florida – New Electronic Filing Requirements U.S. District Court, Southern District of Florida – New Electronic Filing Requirements Effective December 1, 2015, there are important new electronic filing requirements for attorneys in the Southern District of Florida. The most important changes involve the filing of civil sealed and civil ex parte documents electronically via CM/ECF. In addition, there are new electronic filing requirements for emergency matters, motions to appear pro hac vice, and warrants of arrest in rem. For additional information, refer to the brief videos, quick reference sheet, and the revised CM/ECF Administrative Procedures on the court’s website (http://www.flsd.uscourts.gov/?page_id=54). November 15, 2015 Regular Newslast_img read more

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Stopped. No. 22 Washington ends Minnesota’s great streak.

first_imgStopped. No. 22 Washington ends Minnesota’s great streak.Minnesota’s historic 8 victory streak comes to an end in a 5-2 loss.March 7, 2009Jump to CommentsShare on FacebookShare on TwitterShare via EmailPrintSome streaks were snapped Friday evening in Seattle. No. 24 Minnesota, rolling in with an impressive 8 consecutive wins and a recent top 25 break, was finally defeated by No. 22 Washington, 5-2. Freshmen Phillip Arndt and doubles partner Ishay Hadash ended their 8 doubles wins streak Friday, falling to a No. 66 Huskies pair. Personally, Hadash’s 3 singles wins streak also came to a halt as Minnesota’s No. 1 fell to an unranked opponent 5-7, 4-6. Junior captain Dino Bilankov lost his first match after a 5 match winning streak in singles. Arndt won his singles match, as did fellow freshman Julian Dehn. Dehn and doubles partner Sebastain Gallego suprisingly continued their doubles streak, winning their 6th in a row. Washington came out strong winning the doubles point and didn’t really look back after Dehn’s win at the No. 6 spot. The Huskies subsequently won the next 4 matches until Arndt gave the Gophers something positive, a win at the No. 4 spot. The loss is only the 2nd for Minnesota this season. Lousiville beat the Gophers one month ago.last_img read more

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REIT conversion would save Derwent £70m

first_imgTo access this article REGISTER NOWWould you like print copies, app and digital replica access too? SUBSCRIBE for as little as £5 per week. Would you like to read more?Register for free to finish this article.Sign up now for the following benefits:Four FREE articles of your choice per monthBreaking news, comment and analysis from industry experts as it happensChoose from our portfolio of email newsletterslast_img

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Profession’s growth ‘defies gravity’, SRA figures show

first_imgThe number of practising solicitors in England and Wales has risen sharply to more than 120,000, with their ranks growing at an accelerated rate despite the economic pressures faced by the profession, the latest figures have shown. One leading industry commentator claimed that the rise ‘defies gravity’. Figures from the Solicitors Regulation Authority revealed that there were 120,847 solicitors with practising certificates on 31 December, up 7% on the end of 2009. This represents a faster rate of expansion than in previous years, with the profession having grown by only 2% in 2009 and 2008, and 3% in 2007. An SRA spokesman described last year’s 7% rise as ‘surprising’. The regulator does not collate the information required to enable the figures to be broken down into practice areas or type of firm. Legal services expert professor Stephen Mayson, who has argued that non-reserved activities will increasingly be performed by non-qualified individuals to reduce the cost of providing legal services, described the growth as ‘counter-intuitive’. He said: ‘The number of solicitors keeps going up and up, and defies gravity. There are already too many qualified solicitors in the market, and the more that come in, the more competitive this market is going to get [driving down salaries]. ‘Somewhere along the line something has to give, and that either means qualified solicitors leaving the market and doing something else, or being swallowed up by new competitors in consolidation, [with] lower earnings. ‘It does not mean solicitors will have to exit the market, but there will be consequences somewhere.’ Mayson added that it was difficult to see ‘where the expanding numbers are coming from’. He said: ‘Residential conveyancing, personal injury, high street and legal aid are not areas that are associated with growth in this cycle of the economy. The bigger commercial firms are not hiring in the way that they used to. ‘The [numbers] are at odds with everything that we know is going on in the market.’last_img read more

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Caught out

first_imgCricketing solicitor Pete Dodd has been back in touch to say that he was not, as he had thought, the only member of the profession to play in the British team in the Lawyers Cricket World Cup in Barbados. Andrew Bretherton, a partner at Edwin Coe in London, was also fielded, and indeed finished the tournament as leading wicket taker. Well bowled, Brethers!last_img

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Allcargo transports power plant equipment

first_imgSasan Power Limited, a subsidiary of Reliance Power, is commissioning a 3960MW thermal ultra mega power plant in the region.Allcargo will be responsible for transportation, Customs clearance and port handling of the cargoes that include a 345 tonne generator-stator, a de-aerator measuring 43 m in length, and transformers with overall dimensions of 6.2 m x 6 m x 5 m.The transportation has required Allcargo to construct a 1,100 m bypass across the Son River, as the current bridges are not capable of supporting such heavy loads.Only last week, Allcargo Logistics transported seven transformers and accessories for Sasan Power Limited from Mumbai the same power grid sub-station.www.allcargologistics.comwww.cargoequipmentexperts.comlast_img read more

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J Grange releases new EP The Costs of Success

first_imgRising British rapper J Grange released his new EP The Costs of Success earlier this month on 1st May.The independent artist has joined the quest to raise awareness of mental health and mental health problems and inspire action to promote the message of good mental health for all as part of UK Mental Health Week (Monday 18th to Sunday 24th May).For J Grange music has been a priceless anchor, helping him believe that he is good enough and he ​can follow his dreams…a message and thought process he wants to share with anyone who’s true potential is so often stifled.J Grange has experience climbing through his own personal battles with ADHD and anxiety to find peace, self validation and confidence through music.For his music, J Grange has taken inspiration from the greats, continuing on his quest to work hard to perfect his craft.Find out more about J Grange at ​https://jgrangeofficial.com.last_img read more

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