Burlington Free Press to make big changes, shrink size of paper

first_imgFree Press Media,An ongoing $2.4 million rebuild of the FreePressMedia printing press in Burlington is one piece of a 2012 “Triple Crown” that also involves a new format for the printed edition and a new, content-based subscription plan for Free Press platforms, President and Publisher Jim Fogler announced today.”We are making a significant investment in our press and making a tangible commitment to our community. We are not only here to stay, we are here to grow. Our print and digital FreePressMedia platforms, including the Burlington Free Press and burlingtonfreepress.com, will continue to deliver high value and quality. For our local business partners who advertise in our printed edition, it’s a reinvented medium designed to deliver added impact.”Fogler said the full scope of FreePressMedia’s enhancements includes: A $2.4 million rebuild of our 45-year-old press is already in progress. This work will provide a first in the newspaper’s rich 186-year history: the opportunity to provide color photos and advertisements on every printed page. With more color capacity, FreePressMedia will also have the capacity to serve more commercial printed customers. A shift from broadsheet page size to a new tall tab format in June that will give the Burlington Free Press printed edition more of a magazine feel with design upgrades. A new business plan launching in conjunction with the easy-to-use format that will incorporate print and online content into a comprehensive subscription model.The newspaper’s production facility, located on South Winooski Avenue in downtown Burlington, will sport state-of-the-art printing capabilities when work is completed in late April. The Free Press printed edition will convert from a standard broadsheet format to a new, easy-to-use tabloid format (11’ wide x 15’ in length).The printed edition in this new format will be more colorful and feature a modular approach to advertising display which will provide greater impact and ad-size flexibility for advertisers.‘We’ll deliver a more colorful printed edition in a more compact and easy-to-handle size; and pages will be easier to navigate,’ Fogler said. ‘We will differentiate our content to match our platforms ‘ our printed edition will have more narrative storytelling and our web and mobile will be the news of now.’At the heart of the experience for printed edition readers will be the approach pioneered since 2009 in the Free Press’ passion-topics sections: in-depth reporting, rich photographs and eye-catching design in Green Mountain, Savorvore, ARTSbtv and innovate. These approaches have enhanced our coverage of topics that define life in Vermont. The new-look Burlington Free Press will deliver the most accountability reporting and narrative writing in all of Vermont.FreePressMedia will also be changing its subscription model, as part of an historic shift toward digital-first publishing. The new model will provide the flexibility of how, when and where our readers want to consume their local news and information in Vermont. Free Press readers will see significant digital enhancements in the next few months, including more video and photos, and a renewed focus on the topics that matter most to Vermonters. As this happens, FreePressMedia will launch new and improved digital platforms for readers to access news and information, including a more robust mobile site and a tablet-friendly reader experience.Under the new subscription model, subscribers will pay for access to content produced by FreePressMedia and distributed digitally through websites, mobile devices and tablets and in the printed edition. Subscribers may choose from a variety of offers of our full access plans including home delivery of the printed edition (daily, weekends, or Sunday only) and access to our news coverage or they may choose a digital-only plan. And for the first time, subscribers will be able to see the entire printed edition online in an e-Newspaper format. ‘These investments demonstrate our commitment to Chittenden County, and they will help us bring a sense of urgency and deep dives into the narrative of our daily and Sunday news reports ‘ whether you read us on a digital platform or in the printed edition of the Free Press,’ said Michael Townsend, editor of the Free Press. ‘Our readers depend on us to be their community watchdogs, hold our local officials accountable, push for open door meetings, be on the scene when news happens, and to report on what’s most important to them. We will continue to evolve.’About FreePressMediaFreePressMedia is the leading news and information company in the Greater Burlington area. The FreePressMedia family of brands includes more than 12 publications, websites and mobile applications including the Burlington Free Press and BurlingtonFreePress.com, which together have the highest integrated audience reach of any market in Vermont. FreePressMedia is part of Gannett Co, Inc, a leading international news and information company that publishes 81 daily newspapers in the USA, including USA TODAY.BURLINGTON, VT ‘ Free Press Media. 2.23.2012last_img read more

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Northeast Johnson County morning roundup

first_imgKansas July tax revenues beat expectations for first time since March. Tax data released by the Kansas Department of Revenue on Thursday was likely a relief to Gov. Sam Brownback and staffers in his campaign for reelection. The figures showed that revenues were $1.6 million above projections, the first time the state has collected more than it expected to since February. Still, the $408.6 million Kansas took in last month is down 4 percent compared to July 2013, and the state shortfall from the previous three months was more than $300 million. Kansas Democrats were quick to put their spin on the figures. “While it is good to hear that revenue is not under water for the month of July, this still isn’t the ‘shot of adrenaline’ to the Kansas economy that Gov. Brownback promised,” Senate Minority Leader Anthony Hensley told the Lawrence Journal-World. “This is far from the growth needed to get out of the self-inflicted budget crisis that Kansas is facing as the direct result of Brownback’s reckless income tax cuts.” [Kansas revenues in July beat expectations by $1.6M — Lawrence Jounal-World]$1,400 Oklahoma Joe’s order for Air Force One. The Kansas City, Kan., Oklahoma Joe’s that sits just across County Line Road from northeast Johnson County filled a big order for a fellow with a big title Wednesday. The restaurant at Mission Road and 47th Street served up 30 slabs of ribs, 20 pounds of pork and plenty more to go for the Air Force One flight that took President Barack Obama from KC, where he delivered a speech at the Uptown Theater earlier in the day, back to Washington, D.C. [Oklahoma Joe’s fills $1,400 order for Obama, Air Force One — Kansas City Star]Politico moves Kansas governor race to “toss-up.” Another political prediction service has moved its rating of the Kansas governor’s race from “Leans Republican” to “Toss-up.” Sabato’s Crystal Ball out of the University of Virginia Center for Politics revised its rating on the race Wednesday, noting that “In Kansas, despite its strong Republican roots, Gov. Sam Brownback (R) has trailed in a majority of polls to state House Minority Leader Paul Davis. Brownback’s governorship has proven very controversial, costing him support among many more-moderate Republicans in the Jayhawk State.” Earlier this month, the Cook Political report also shifted its rating on the race from “Lean Republican” to “Toss-up.” [2014 Governor Race Ratings — Politico]last_img read more

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Indian Hills’ production of Legally Blonde opens 3-day run Thursday

first_imgThe Indian Hills production of Legally Blonde opens Thursday and runs through Saturday.Theatre patrons interested in seeing a group of young thespians show that you don’t have to have a lot of experience to put on an impressive production can head to Indian Hills tonight through Saturday.The middle school’s 2015 musical, Legally Blonde, opens tonight at 7 p.m. Additional showings will be Friday and Saturday at 7 p.m.Director Cheryl Hodges-Thrutchley said she chose the show about a seemingly intellectually challenge blonde who works her way through Harvard Law School in part because of the large cast it calls for.“I try to pick shows that have numerous parts, to showcase as many students as possible,” she said. “For many of our students in the cast, it is their first opportunity to perform in a musical production.”This year’s performance features a record 125 cast members — and two dogs.last_img read more

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Study suggests statins reduce deaths in severe flu infections

first_imgDec 15, 2011 (CIDRAP News) – The use of statins—widely used lipid-control drugs—was associated with a 41% lower death rate in patients who were hospitalized with influenza, according to a surveillance study from the 2007-08 flu season that spanned 10 states.Over the past several years, researchers have identified possible statin benefits for other diseases. For flu, the drugs have the potential to inhibit the release of cytokines, pro-inflammatory chemicals that are thought to play a role in the type of severe pathophysiologic changes in seen in human H5N1 avian flu infections.Studies to gauge the effect of statins on flu have produced mixed results. But the latest study, published yesterday in the Journal of Infectious Diseases (JID), is the first to limit the analysis to lab-confirmed flu cases.The analysis is based on data from the influenza hospitalization surveillance system of the US Center for Disease Control and Prevention’s Emerging Infections Program, which encompasses 59 counties in 10 states. Demographic and clinical data were collected from each patient’s medical record, and the researchers obtained flu vaccination information from charts, registries, physicians, or patients.The researchers recorded any statin use before or during hospitalization, but they did not collect the dose or frequency.Surveillance subjects included adults who were hospitalized between Oct 1, 2007, and Apr 30, 2008, within 14 days of a positive influenza test. Testing methods included viral culture, immunofluorescence antibody staining, reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (PCR), a commercial rapid flu test, serologic testing, or an unspecified test noted in the patient’s records.With 3,043 patients included in the analysis, the average age was 70.4 years, and 56% were women. More than half (57.1%) had been vaccinated, and 33.3% (1,013) were given statins before or during hospitalization. Of that group, 76% were on statins before and during hospitalization. Those who used statins were more likely to be male and white, to have a cardiac or other underlying medical condition, and to have been vaccinated against flu.Of the study group, 151 (5%) died within 30 days after their flu diagnosis, the majority of them shortly after hospital discharge.After controlling for age, race, underlying medical conditions, vaccination status, and antiviral use, the researchers reported a 41% reduction (adjusted odds ratio, 0.59; 95% confidence interval, 0.38-0.92) in mortality in patients who took statins before or during hospitalization.The results agree with the findings of two other studies that explored links between statins and flu mortality, but those studies used broader disease classifications that included pneumonia, rather than lab-confirmed flu, according to the authors.However, they said a 2010 study found no benefits from statin use for acute respiratory infections in a primary care setting. That study didn’t assess prescription adherence and used different disease end points that didn’t include more severe outcomes. “Statins may be more beneficial at preventing disease outcomes, such as death, but may not play a role in reducing the incidence of infection or minor illness,” the authors wrote.Several limitations citedThe researchers detailed three main limitations of their findings: testing issues, limitations of chart data, and the possibility of a “healthy user bias” in people who take statins.They noted that the study cohort may not reflect all patients hospitalized with flu, including those who weren’t tested for the disease. Also, the limited sensitivity of the rapid tests could lead to underestimation of the number of cases.According to the CDC, the sensitivity of rapid flu tests ranges from 50% to 70%, and their accuracy is influenced by the level of flu in the community. False-negatives are more likely when disease prevalence is high.Ann Thomas, MD, MPH, the study’s corresponding author and a public health physician with the Oregon Public Health Division, in an e-mail detailed the percentages for the flu confirmation methods: 75% rapid test, 11% direct immunofluorescent assay (DFA), 11% cell culture, and 6% PCR. She said the total exceeds 100% because some patients with positive rapid tests likely had other confirmatory tests.She said that, since the 2009 H1N1 pandemic, clinicians have become more interested in knowing the subtype, and PCR has now become the dominant test to identify flu cases for the Emerging Infections Program surveillance system. However, before that time, including the 2007-08 flu season, about 75% of the surveillance systems cases were diagnosed by rapid test.She noted that most of the cases during the study were identified during peak flu season, when the positive predictive value of rapid testing is higher, which Thomas said makes the study group hopeful that the test results are accurate.It’s unlikely that statin use would be associated with false-positive rapid test results or that death is more or less likely in subjects with false-positive results, she wrote. “My guess would be that inclusion of patients who did not really have influenza would bias us towards the null,” she saidExploring statin use in patients who had negative rapid tests would require the investigators to do chart abstractions, which they weren’t able to do because they didn’t collect information on that group, Thomas noted.Another challenge the researchers had was determining the true number of deaths. Since the study relied mainly on chart data, they attempted to clarify the number of deaths by reviewing local vital statistics records to see if any of the hospitalized patients died within 30 days of hospital discharge.The reliance on chart data also made it difficult for the researchers to assess the underlying functional health status of the patients, which they wrote could influence the relationship between statins and flu severity, introducing a possible “healthy user” bias. However, they noted that the statin users were older, had more underlying conditions, and had longer hospital stays, suggesting that their baseline health was no better than that of patients not taking the drugs.The researchers concluded that their findings suggest that statins are a promising area for further study and could be a useful adjunct to antiviral medication and vaccines, especially when viruses aren’t susceptible to medication or when the flu vaccine is in short supply or not well matched to the circulating strains.Future studies—ideally randomized controlled trials—exploring a possible role for statins in treating influenza should include analysis of functional status, dose and duration of therapy, statin use in younger patients, and identification of the most effective class of statins, they wrote.Slowly mounting evidenceIn an editorial in JID yesterday, Dr Edward Walsh, with the Infectious Diseases Division at the University of Rochester School of Medicine in New York, wrote that the findings are a significant addition to the slowly mounting evidence that statins may reduce annual flu burden and deaths, because the study links deaths to lab-confirmed flu.As in many observational studies, unrecognized factors, such as the “healthy user” bias, may affect the results and conclusion, Walsh wrote, noting that similar concerns have been raised about flu vaccine efficacy in older people.The analysis did not find that the influenza vaccine and antivirals reduced the number of deaths, though it did show a nonsignificant benefit for antivirals, he pointed out.Walsh said the findings raise several key questions about the relationship between statins and flu deaths, such as what mechanism is responsible. For example, he said it’s unclear if statins are more effective in flu complicated by bacterial infection or if the main benefit is due to anti-inflammatory effects that help prevent heart attacks and strokes during flu epidemics. It’s often difficult to assess the cause of deaths in chart review studies, so scientists can only speculate about what statin mechanisms might provide a benefit, he wrote.More high-quality prospective observational studies are needed to confirm the findings, but a randomized trial of the effects of long-term statin use on flu outcomes would be logistically difficult, and clinicians probably wouldn’t administer statins solely to reduce flu severity, Walsh said.However, he said such studies could support the use of statins in a pandemic setting, a strategy suggested in 2006 by David Fedson, MD, an internationally known vaccine expert. Fedson has said that if research confirms the benefits of statins for flu patients, they may offer hope for patients in countries where antiviral and vaccine supplies are scarce.Vandermeer ML, Thomas AR, Kamimoto L, et al. Association between use of statins and mortality among patients hospitalized with laboratory-confirmed influenza virus infections: a multistate study. J Infect Dis 2011 Dec 14 [Abstract]Walsh E. Statins and influenza: can we move forward? (Editorial) J Infect Dis 2011 Dec 14 [Extract]See also:Jun 30, 2006, CIDRAP News story “Paris meeting airs avian flu impacts, possible treatment”last_img read more

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Crowley’s Crew Get Recognition for Kulluk Salvage Effort

first_img[mappress]Press Release, June 19, 2013 The captain and crew of Crowley’s Prevention and Response tug (PRT) Alert were personally recognized by Representative Eric Feige from the Alaska State Legislature for courage, teamwork and professionalism during the emergency rescue tow of the drill barge Kulluk off the southern point of Kodiak Island.During their meeting, he presented them with a letter of commendation from the members of the 28th Alaska State Legislature, which stated the following: “The crew safely and methodically adapted to changing conditions, used their training to identify and manage hazards, and then performed each task to minimize the risks associated with those hazards…We express our admiration and respect to each man individually, and to the crew for its superb teamwork, conducting themselves at all times as professional mariners in an extreme and challenging incident.”Typically used for tanker escorts to and from the Alyeska Valdez Marine Terminal, the 10,192-horsepower Alert departed Valdez in response to the Unified Command’s request for assistance and arrived on scene to find Kulluk adrift at 4.5 knots in rough weather and sea conditions. The crew of Alert was able to catch a training line from Kulluk, despite having their deck awash by 30-foot seas, and proceeded to tie off and commence tow. The crew slowed and re-oriented the Kulluk’s drift so that the original towing tugboat could secure a connection to the drilling rig. However, with increasing heavy weather the original towing tug connection parted after approximately 10 hours.Once attached, Alert remained tethered by emergency tow line to the Kulluk and continuously maintained tow. With 54-foot seas and 40 to 50 knot winds, the Alert was being pushed backwards up to two knots toward the Kodiak Island shore. A day later, the Unified Command directed the Alert to release the tow wire. Only after confirmation of the order, did the crew of the Alert reluctantly release their tow wire.As stated in the commendation referencing the U.S. Coast Guard’s investigation of the incident: “The tug Alert and all of Crowley Maritime Services [Crowley] equipment used in the evolution of the rescue attempt and towing of the Kulluk performed flawlessly, met and exceeded standards.”Following the formal recognition of the crew by Rep. Feige, he along with Mayor Dave Cobb from the City of Valdez, spent two hours touring the Alert and individually congratulating each member of the crew including: Captain Rod Layton, Brad Burger, Brett Spellman, James Mueller, Craig Matthews, Leroy Edenshawn and Walt Nickerson.“This was a fine tribute to what we value – our people, operational excellence and innovation,” said Charlie Nalen, Crowley’s vice president of Valdez Operations.Crowley’s Valdez operation includes personnel and specialized tugs to help protect the environment through a contract with Alyeska Pipeline Service Company’s Ship Escort/Response Vessel System (SERVS). As part of the commercial partnership, the company provides tug escorts for tankers traveling through Prince William Sound to and from the Valdez Marine Terminal, assuring safe passage, even under the most extreme winter weather conditions and also provides secure docking and undocking operations at the oil product loading terminals. Primary tugs in the area include both Alert and Prince William Sound class vessels, all of which were specifically designed for tanker escort and assist work in the region and feature best-in-class technology, firefighting, emergency and oil spill response capabilities. Annual emergency tow exercises of loaded tankers conducted by SERVS well prepared the Alert crew for the Kulluk rescue tow.Jacksonville-based Crowley Holdings Inc., a holding company of the 121-year-old Crowley Maritime Corporation, is a privately held family and employee-owned company. The company provides project solutions, transportation and logistics services in domestic and international markets by means of six operating lines of business: Puerto Rico/Caribbean Liner Services, Latin America Liner Services, Logistics Services, Petroleum Services, Marine Services and Technical Services. Offered within these operating lines of business are: liner container shipping, logistics, contract towing and transportation; ship assist and escort; energy support; salvage and emergency response through its TITAN Salvage subsidiary; vessel management; vessel construction and naval architecture through its Jensen Maritime subsidiary; government services, and petroleum and chemical transportation, distribution and sales.Read More on the Kulluk incident here.last_img read more

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Avoiding a constitutional standoff

first_img Angelo Micciche, Borlase & Co, Helston, Cornwall I agree entirely with Joshua Rozenberg. Newspapers would help their own cause by just reporting the news and not stretching extra-marital tittle-tattle to several pages in each daily edition. Not door-stepping errant spouses and their young families would also be a good start. I am, however, concerned when specialist firms accuse the press of having a vested interest, when these firms stand to make millions of pounds out of shoring up the self-damaged reputations of the rich and powerful. Privacy may well be a right, but notably, like anti-defamation law, only for those who can afford it. Our courts, executive and the advisers of those seeking super-injunctions should be more worldly wise and acknowledge the ‘Streisand effect’, and the technological and jurisdictional limitations of such a legal remedy. Together with the fourth estate they should give greater respect to the balance of privacy with freedom of the press – both are, along with respect for the legal system, essential for a healthy democracy. A constitutional standoff between the courts and members of parliament would be avoided and the use of what are effectively peacetime D notices for extra-curricular activities would end immediately. Do our senior judges really need more legislation and guidance from parliament, which in any event and in practice would have to be interpreted by judges, in order to balance our freedoms?last_img read more

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UK needs housing crisis solution

first_imgSubscribe to Building today and you will benefit from:Unlimited access to all stories including expert analysis and comment from industry leadersOur league tables, cost models and economics dataOur online archive of over 10,000 articlesBuilding magazine digital editionsBuilding magazine print editionsPrinted/digital supplementsSubscribe now for unlimited access.View our subscription options and join our community Stay at the forefront of thought leadership with news and analysis from award-winning journalists. Enjoy company features, CEO interviews, architectural reviews, technical project know-how and the latest innovations.Limited access to building.co.ukBreaking industry news as it happensBreaking, daily and weekly e-newsletters Subscribe now for unlimited access To continue enjoying Building.co.uk, sign up for free guest accessExisting subscriber? LOGIN Get your free guest access  SIGN UP TODAYlast_img read more

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BIM and the dark arts of insurance

first_imgSubscribe now for unlimited access Get your free guest access  SIGN UP TODAY To continue enjoying Building.co.uk, sign up for free guest accessExisting subscriber? LOGIN Stay at the forefront of thought leadership with news and analysis from award-winning journalists. Enjoy company features, CEO interviews, architectural reviews, technical project know-how and the latest innovations.Limited access to building.co.ukBreaking industry news as it happensBreaking, daily and weekly e-newsletters Subscribe to Building today and you will benefit from:Unlimited access to all stories including expert analysis and comment from industry leadersOur league tables, cost models and economics dataOur online archive of over 10,000 articlesBuilding magazine digital editionsBuilding magazine print editionsPrinted/digital supplementsSubscribe now for unlimited access.View our subscription options and join our communitylast_img read more

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Crew safe after Purple Beach fire

first_imgThe ship’s own carbon dioxide extinguishing system was used by the crew to suppress the fire, and the cargo hold concerned was sealed as an immediate counter measure, said MACS. The crew has since been evacuated and brought to safety.Since May 26, the Central Command for Maritime Emergencies Germany (CCME) has taken over command of the fire-fighting operations and all further actions, but MACS says it is supporting the rescue team in all available resources.A fire-fighting unit of the CCME and the multipurpose vessel Mellum have been accompanying Purple Beach at deep water roads anchorage in the German Bight, about 30 km west of Helgoland.The CCME continues to examine the vessel, which was loaded with fertilisers in the port of Antwerp. The Atlantic Task Force (ATF) has also been alerted.Measures taken should provide an overall impression of the vessel to the CCME in order to determine further steps, said MACS. The ship operator added that it is already in negotiation for another charter vessel, and will announce the substitute ship shortly.  www.macship.comlast_img read more

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4 charged in Senegal over doctored WhatsApp photo of president

first_imgFour people have been charged over sharing a doctored photo of Senegalese President Macky Sall’s face superimposed on the body of a naked man via WhatsApp, a lawyer said on Friday.The three women and one man, all in their twenties, where imprisoned on Friday in Dakar after a judge charged them with sharing an offensive image and criminal conspiracy, Bassirou Sakho, the lawyer of one of the women told AFP.According to local media, police are searching for a fifth person who is currently in The Gambia for allegedly sending the image via the messaging application.A member of the WhatsApp group had alerted police, according to local media.Punishment in the west African country for sending offensive images ranges from one month to two years imprisonment with fines of up to 300 000 CFA francs ($515).The arrests come as the country gears up for legislative elections on July 30, with the deadline for submitting candidates in the poll expiring earlier this week.Senegal is widely considered one of the continent’s most stable democracies.last_img read more

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