Wenger rejects Mourinho jinx

first_imgWith just six games left of the season, Chelsea look set to win their first league title since 2010, but their neighbours will be looking to create a bit of uncertainty in that outcome on Sunday, while also further cementing second spot.Wenger is well aware that he has not managed to beat Mourinho in 12 attempts, but he does not think that fact will have any influence on the game this weekend.“I am not a great believer in history. We have not always lost in 12 attempts and a few times have been close to beating them.“But, having said that, the result on Sunday will be just down to the performance on the day.“We’re on a good run and from a good run of form you get good belief. We have a strong solidarity too.“We know we have passed many tests. We’ve beaten Manchester City away from home and we have another test on Sunday that we want to pass.“What we require is to nullify Chelsea’s strengths. If you look at the numbers they have been very efficient on counter-attacks, very efficient on set-pieces.”Even if Arsenal manage to claim victory on Sunday, Wenger admits it will still be difficult to catch Chelsea at the top of the table.“Mathematically possible. But Chelsea have the championship in their hands but what we can do is get closer to them,” he said.“We have an opportunity to do that at home and we want to take it. We want to strengthen our position in second because it’s far from being done.”0Shares0000(Visited 1 times, 1 visits today) 0Shares0000LONDON, April 23- Arsenal manager Arsene Wenger believes the club’s recent struggles against Chelsea will have no bearing on the clash between the two sides on Sunday.The two London clubs sit first and second in the Premier League, but the Blues will arrive at the Emirates with a 10-point advantage over the Gunners.last_img read more

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Fort St. John marches to end victim-blaming

first_imgAs the woman walked next to a young girl she identified as a friend, she also said it’s very important that young girls learn such valuable lessons at an early age, to avoid exposure to such a mentality.The Slut Walk is an international campaign that has been attended by thousands of people around the world.Photos from the event are below: A large variety of people gathered at the local park, eventually marching down the streets of the city with the intention of spreading the word that victim-blaming is a problem that needs to be addressed within our protective services and in society as a whole.The event began with a number of speeches from organizers, including supporters and politicians, as Mayor Lori Ackerman addressed the crowd.Ackerman spoke of the importance of rallies like these, even quoting Albert Einstein in her speech.- Advertisement -“I have a couple of quotes that came to mind, and the first one is Einstein, who said, ‘The difference between genius and stupidity is that genius has its limits’.”One woman marching, who wished to remain anonymous, says the burden should not be placed on women when it comes to such a heinous crime.”It’s important that women not be in a defensive position when they are putting in a complaint against an aggressor or an attacker,” she argues. “Women should not be subjected to questions as to what you are wearing or how many drinks you have; simply by showing up at a club or a party, that does not mean, yes, I am fair game.”Advertisementlast_img read more

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Datebook 6/18

first_img 160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set! TODAY YMCA Golf Classic, 1-8 p.m., Wood Ranch Golf Club, 301 Wood Ranch Road, Simi Valley. $175 for one player or $700 for four. Call (805) 497-3081. Red Cross workshop on CPR/AED devices, 6-9 p.m., Encino Community Center, 4935 Balboa Blvd. Fee: $35. Call (818) 995-1690. Mail Datebook entries – including time, date, location and phone number – to Daily News City Desk, P.O. Box 4200, Woodland Hills, CA 91365; fax (818) 713-0058; e-mail dnmetro@dailynews.com.last_img read more

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South Central farmers evicted

first_imgNot legal challenges, not folk singers’ entreaties, not even a last-minute infusion of $10 million could save the South Central Farm. Sheriff’s deputies moved in before dawn Tuesday to evict the farmers from the 14-acre plot, a rare swath of green in the otherwise industrial belt between Alameda Street and Long Beach Avenue. Seeking to prolong the multi-year land dispute, protestors chained themselves to pipes inside. Actress Daryl Hannah, environmental activist John Quigley and a few other demonstrators secured themselves above the fray in a walnut tree. Supporters poured in, chanting and waving signs, as deputies and Los Angeles Police Department officers bearing clubs and shotguns surrounded protestors, making arrests. “This is the end, my friend,” said Tezozomoc, one of the farmers’ representatives, quoting a line from Jim Morrison. “But we don’t know yet. This is just another chapter.” But Horowitz, reportedly furious about being cast as the villain by farm supporters, rejected the offer and demanded their removal. At 5 a.m. Tuesday, 65 helmeted deputies of the sheriff’s Civil Management Unit moved in, with the LAPD and Los Angeles Fire Department assisting. Authorities cut through the chain-link fence around the farm and extricated the demonstrators who’d locked themselves inside. Then came an earthmover to level off the ground for a fire engine. The truck pulled inside and extended its ladder, eventually plucking the remaining protestors from the tree shortly after noon. The LAPD arrested 27 people on suspicion of failing to disperse, and sheriff’s deputies arrested another 17, including Hannah, on suspicion of failing to obey a court order and obstructing a peace officer. “Our goal is to do this safely,” sheriff’s Sgt. Val Rosario said. “Safely for the community, safely for the people inside, and of course, safely for our personnel.” The scene was chaotic, but largely peaceful. There were demonstrators accusing the authorities of breaking apart the community. Then there were counter-demonstrators accusing the farmers of breaking apart the community. Then came the guitar players, then the drummers. Armed with an ear-splitting whistle and a pot she banged with a rock, farmer Andrea Rodriguez angrily defended the site she’s come to rely on. “We want to go back to Mother Earth, get nutrition for our families,” she said in Spanish. “We will struggle. We won’t go. We are all together and we will not leave. We’re just farmers, we don’t have money, but we’re still important.” Repeated attempts to reach Horowitz at his office were unsuccessful, though he told The Associated Press that he found the farmers to be ungrateful and wanted his land back. Though Dan Stormer, an attorney for the farmers, said they’ll have one more day in court in July to try to claim ownership of the land, Horowitz has already said he will not sell to the farmers or their supporters. A few hours after the evictions, Villaraigosa spoke with Horowitz on the telephone and reiterated his support for the Annenberg Foundation’s $16 million offer. But Horowitz said the property was worth even more money, Villaraigosa told reporters later. Horowitz also told the mayor he felt personally vilified by the farmers and wouldn’t sell until he evicted every single person from the land. “I told him that from my vantage point, this is a more than fair offer. This is an opportunity for us to have an urban garden in the city that wants to be the greenest big city in America,” Villaraigosa said. “And he said, well, that was nice but he wasn’t accepting.” While running for mayor, Villaraigosa pledged to help save the farm and, once in office, assigned Deputy Mayor Larry Frank to seek private donations to help the farmers buy the land from Horowitz. But the price was a moving target, the mayor said, going from about an estimated $6 million to $10 million to $12 million to the final price tag of $16 million. The mayor and allies had a hard time raising funds to buy the land because many potential donors felt the land wasn’t worth the price. “I understand a businessman’s need to invest and make a profit. I also have a high respect for and will defend property rights,” Villaraigosa said. “But I also believe that we are called upon by a sense of community and civic duty to do the just and right thing. I had hoped that the landowner would have heeded that call.” Staff Writer Kerry Cavanaugh contributed to this report. brent.hopkins@dailynews.com 818-713-3738160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set! AD Quality Auto 360p 720p 1080p Top articles1/5READ MORE11 theater productions to see in Southern California this week, Dec. 27-Jan. 2 A chapter in the struggle that dates back to the mid-1990s, one involving celebrities and community activists, political pressure and complex land deals. Developer Ralph Horowitz bought the site two decades ago, lost it to the city through eminent domain, then bought it back for the original price the city paid him. In the interim, the sizeable site became used by more than 350 families to farm peppers, cilantro, squash and indigenous herbs. But after Horowitz regained the property with the intent to transform the rows of corn and cactus into a commercial project, the farmers sat on tenuous ground. They fired off 61 claims to block development, all rejected by the court, and requested a temporary restraining order, also turned down. They enlisted the help of high profile supporters like Hannah, folk icon Joan Baez, guitarist Ben Harper and his actress wife Laura Dern. And they relentlessly lobbied Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa to use his clout to keep the site open. Through various sources, his office was able to wrangle $6 million in donations, well short of the $16.3 million Horowitz originally requested to sell the site. Last week, the Annenberg Foundation announced a surprise offer of $10 million in cash and an agreement to finance the remaining $6 million.last_img read more

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Low profile on Cemex plan

first_imgSANTA CLARITA – The city has spent nearly $7 million fighting the 56.1 million-ton sand and gravel mine planned in Soledad Canyon, but local environmental groups who have been vocal on many issues have kept a relatively low profile on the Cemex mine. The groups all oppose the mining plan, but are largely relying on the city’s deep pockets to wage the public battle. “At the beginning of the Cemex issue I realized this was going to be a long-term issue with a lot of legal ramifications,” said Henry Schultz, vice chairman of the Santa Clarita Sierra Club. The Sierra Club signed on to the city’s lawsuit against the Bureau of Land Management, which granted the mining rights. “We figured the city would be the active pursuer of avenues against Cemex.” The Sierra Club lent its name, but did not help finance the BLM suit, Schultz said. AD Quality Auto 360p 720p 1080p Top articles1/5READ MOREFrumpy Middle-aged Mom: My realistic 2020 New Year’s resolutions. Some involve doughnuts.Friends of the Santa Clara River, Santa Clarita Organization for Planning the Environment, and Safe Action for the Environment have also given the mine a thumbs down. Cemex hopes to begin operating in the canyon in 2008 and could mine about 70 million tons of sand and gravel over the next 20 years, with up to 600 trucks a day going in and out. Santa Clarita officials say Cemex’s proposal amounts to 10 times the level of historic mining in the area, and the company should extract no more than 300,000 tons a year, they say. Since 1999, the city has lodged lawsuits against Cemex and against government agencies for allowing the mine, hired lobbyists, taken out ads and bought the mine property and surrounding acreage, for a pricetag of $6.8 million. On Wednesday, the city erected an 80-foot billboard near the juncture of the Antelope Valley Freeway and Sand Canyon Road, saying more traffic jams will result from trucks coming in and out. “Yet again the city is spending taxpayer dollars on a campaign of myths and nonfactual information,” said Susana Duarte, a Cemex spokeswoman. Cemex says it will mail information about the mine to residents and place it on its Web site in a campaign called Straight Talk, which Duarte said will provide facts about the project’s size, the scope and the impact. “Our goal is to make sure residents can make informed and educated decisions regarding this project based on facts that have been verified by numerous studies, officials and authorities,” she said. A leader of the Friends of the Santa Clara River, which has sued the Castaic Lake Water Agency and the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers over other issues, says the group sees no need now to duplicate what others are doing to fight the mine. “We realized the big players were in there litigating against this one – the city, the county – and we have so many things on our plate,” said Ron Bottorff, the group’s chairman. “We (figured) we would save our ammunition for other areas.” Bottorff said the group will track the mine’s impact on the upper river area, keeping an eye on any lowering of the water table and loss of vegetation. “If we start to see areas of the upper river drying up we will certainly take action,” he said. “A probable outcome would be litigation against the mine if we see these things happening.” SCOPE President Lynne Plambeck said its many efforts against the mine complement the city’s. “SCOPE has spent as much time and money fighting the Cemex project as it spent fighting Newhall Ranch,” she said. Attorneys representing the group work pro bono, she said. In 1992 the group protested a mining application to draw water from the river and notified nearby landowners of the matter, filed a protest with the BLM on behalf of itself and other environmental groups, published updates in its newsletter sent to 2,500 households, and mailed out action alerts. Safe Action for the Environment, a nonprofit corporation based in Canyon Country, works closely with the city and helped create almost all of the major air quality studies for the environmental reports, said board member Andy Fried, who lives in Agua Dulce. The group is involved in other issues regarding the mine’s compliance with city and county rules. “In terms of private organizations, no question SAFE has taken the lead,” said Fried, a past president of the Agua Dulce Town Council. “We feel the size and scope of this mine is completely incompatible with the surrounding land uses,” he said. “The group formed in 1999 to protect the environmental integrity of the Santa Clarita Valley and the Antelope Valley. Cemex was the major motivation for creating SAFE.” Fried said the group has spent or committed almost $120,000 to the fight against Cemex. He and his wife, Judy, have contributed most of the money, Fried said. He would accept the mine on the city’s terms, at historic levels. “We all live in houses that sit on concrete pads, have concrete driveways, drive on streets that have an asphalt base,” he said. “Obviously, concrete is a necessary component to everybody’s lifestyle. There is no question we need aggregate to fill the needs here, but we don’t need to be exporting it.” Cemex says the materials are destined for the Greater Los Angeles Area. judy.orourke@dailynews.com (661) 257-5255 A CLOSER LOOK Since 1999, the city of Santa Clarita has spent nearly $7 million fighting the Cemex mine proposed in Soledad Canyon. Attorneys’ fees for four lawsuits: $3.5 million Buying 412 acres surrounding the mine site in 2003: $1.2 million Buying 493 acres, including the mine property, in 2004: $755,000 Legislative lobbying: $600,000* Environmental research, including reports on water, air quality and traffic: $341,000** Radio and TV advertising, print ads, mailings and other outreach: nearly $200,000 Economic reports studying the need for rock and gravel, and the mine’s impact on the Santa Clarita Valley: $82,000*** Settlement of lawsuit over Public Records Act: $50,000**** *Paid to Washington, D.C.-based Jamison and Sullivan, and Los Angeles-based Afriat Consulting **Paid to Wildan Engineering and others ***Paid to Rand Corp., the Rose Institute and Parsons ****Paid to law firm Baker and McKenzie, which represented Cemex160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set!last_img read more

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R2.2bn upgrade for South Africa’s rail system

first_imgRay Maota Prasa’s investment in rail infrastructure aims to make rail the backbone of transport systems in the country, as it is able to carry high volumes of commuters. (Image: MediaClubSouthAfrica.com. For more free photos, visit the image library) Prasa CEO Lucky Montana said that the new signalling upgrades and the introduction of new technology will ensure operational efficiency, unlock capacity and improve reliability. (Image: Prasa) MEDIA CONTACTS • Nana Zenani  Prasa: Group Head of Communication  +27 71 860 8500 RELATED ARTICLES • Motor industry, government talk more jobs • Gautrain’s Pretoria route rolls out • Public rail to get R97-billion revamp • Impressive growth at South Africa’s Ngqura PortThe Passenger Rail Agency of South Africa (Prasa) plans to install a modern signalling system to enable the country’s trains to run more smoothly.Prasa announced its plans at the Railway Safety Imbizo in Mamelodi East, Pretoria, on 12 October 2011, coinciding with Transport Month in South Africa.The agency has set aside R1.9-billion (US$242-million) to overhaul trains’ signalling systems.The investment forms part of Prasa’s aim to make rail the backbone of transport systems in the country, as it is able to carry high volumes of commuters.Prasa CEO Lucky Montana said: “The new signalling upgrades and the introduction of new technology will ensure operational efficiency, unlocking capacity and improving reliability.”Deputy Minister of Transport Jeremy Cronin said that rail was a far safer mode of transport as there were few accidents and fatalities than road-based transport.Phase one of the signal upgrade has already begun at the Midway-Lenz corridor in the south of Johannesburg.Improvements will also be done in KwaZulu-Natal and the Eastern Cape in November.Doubling rail tracks and improving stationsPrasa has also set aside R373-million ($47-million) to double rail tracks at Pretoria’s Eerste Fabrieke and Greenview, build a new station at Greenville and upgrade the Mamelodi Gardens and Pienaarspoort stations.The doubling of 4.5km of tracks is currently under way between the Eerste Fabrieke and Greenview stations.“In both Greenview and Midway-Lenz we deal with higher than normal passenger numbers and have prioritised these and other high-volume corridors in line with passenger demand to deliver quality passenger rail services,” said Montana.According to Prasa, the Mamelodi to Pretoria CBD corridor accommodates 91 000 commuters daily.With Metrorail running only a single train in and out of the section between Eerste Fabrieke and Pienaarspoort via Mamelodi Gardens, the doubling of the rail tracks will enhance the ability to transport the 31 000 commuters during peak hour.Metrorail is Prasa’s commuter rail operator.Prasa’s predictions are that peak-hour traffic at these stations will almost double in the coming years, warranting an improvement to the facilities.“With the finalisation of the rail-doubling project and the introduction of bi-directional signalling, our rail operator will be able to almost double the number of daily trains on the corridor, necessitating increasing the combined capacity of these three key stations from handling approximately 39 000 people per day to 58 000 people per day in future,” said Montana.After the upgrade the Mamelodi Gardens station will have two island platforms instead of one, and one platform will be extended by 50m.A new station with two island platforms and four platforms will be constructed at Greenview, while a contractor is still being procured for the construction at Pienaarspoort station.Montana added: “Our aim as Prasa is to improve the running time in the corridor from a 30-minute waiting period to five to seven minutes – effectively moving approximately 60 000 people to their areas of employment on time.”Job creationThe rail improvement project will create 398 jobs.The current phase of the project has already generated 268 jobs, from which 181 are specifically for the unskilled, semi-skilled and nearby communities.The next phase will produce 130 jobs, while permanent jobs will also be available after the end of construction as stations will need personnel.Relocation of residentsResidents living in houses close to the railway tracks have been relocated, with Prasa making sure the individuals are satisfied with the new arrangements.According to Prasa, the owners were approached with offers to purchase and were allowed to negotiate the terms of sale. The owners were also able choose their new houses and preferred locations, with Prasa overseeing the relocation process.Prasa will also help with the registration process.Montana said: “We want to ensure that the upgrading of the stations does not interfere with the stability of the communities located close to our rail tracks. We want to treat them with the upmost dignity and respect during their relocation.”last_img read more

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On this week’s show: Detecting childhood eye disease in old photos, and inserting memories into zebra finches

first_imgJim Brendon/Flickr Host Sarah Crespi talks with undergraduate student Micheal Munson from Baylor University in Waco, Texas, about a smartphone app that scans photos in the phone’s library for eye disease in kids. And Sarah talks with Todd Roberts of the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center in Dallas, Texas, about incepting memories into zebra finches to study how they learn their songs. Using a technique called optogenetics—in which specific neurons can be controlled by pulses of light—the researchers introduced false song memories by turning on neurons in different patterns, with longer or shorter note durations than typical zebra finch songs.This week’s episode was edited by Podigy.Ads on this week’s show: MOVA Globes; KiwiCo.comDownload a transcript (PDF)Listen to previous podcasts.About the Science Podcastlast_img read more

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Argentina strike late to advance to World Cup knockout stages,Argentina strike late to advance to World Cup knockout stages

first_imgArgentina’s Lionel Messi celebrates scoring their first goal in the 2018 Football World Cup in a match against Nigeria in the Saint Petersburg Stadium, Saint Petersburg, Russia, June 26, 2018.   –  REUTERS Argentina’s Lionel Messi celebrates scoring their first goal in the 2018 Football World Cup in a match against Nigeria in the Saint Petersburg Stadium, Saint Petersburg, Russia, June 26, 2018.   –  REUTERS June 27, 2018 COMMENT SHARE Argentina and Lionel Messi progressed to the last 16 of the World Cup by the skin of their teeth on Tuesday after an 86th minute strike from defender Marcos Rojo gave them a 2-1 win over Nigeria, eliminating the African side.Croatia advance as winners of Group D with the maximum nine points after beating Iceland 2-1 and Nigeria were just minutes away from joining them before central defender Rojo superbly volleyed home a Gabriel Mercado cross from the right.Messi had put Argentina ahead in the 14th minute, with a fabulously taken goal but the Africans equalised through a Victor Moses penalty in the 51st minute and the twice World Cup winners struggled to respond to that setback with a ragged second half display.In front of a massive following of passionate and loud Argentine fans, the game began in ideal fashion for Jorge Sampaoli’s side, who had managed just a point from their opening two games.A perfectly weighted diagonal ball over the top by Ever Banega was sublimely brought down on the outside of his thigh by Messi who then drove past Nigeria’s teenage keeper Francis Uzoho to open the scoring.The selection of Banega proved to be an inspired one by Sampaoli with the Sevilla midfielder providing the quality service that had been lacking in their opening two games. Banega almost inspired a second goal for the Argentines when he put Angel Di Maria clear, the winger being brought down by Leon Balogun and Messi struck the woodwork from the resulting free kick with a curler from the left against the far post.It had been an impressive half from Argentina but the game was to take a twist shortly after the interval.Defending a corner, Argentine defender Javier Mascherano jockeyed Leon Balogun inside the area and when the Nigerian fell to the floor, Turkish referee Cuneyt Cakir awarded a penalty. After lengthy and impassioned protests from the Argentine players, Moses managed to keep his cool and slot past Franco Armani to level the scores.Nigeria wasted several chances to add a second and secure their place in the last 16 before the unlikely source of Manchester United central defender Rojo kept Argentina’s tournament alive and left Nigeria in despair.Valiant end In the group’s other match, Iceland played Croatia, which had already qualified to the next round in the world cup.Iceland’s maiden World Cup adventure came to a valiant end as they lost 2-1 by Group D winners Croatia due to a late strike from Ivan Perisic.Iceland missed a flurry of early chances but went behind in the second half to a lethal strike from Croatia midfielder Milan Badelj, although Gylfi Sigurdsson levelled from the penalty spot in the 76th minute to set up an enthralling finish.Argentina’s 2-1 win over Nigeria meant Iceland would have qualified with a victory but instead their hearts sank when Perisic smashed into the far corner in the 90th minute.Iceland, the smallest ever nation to compete at a World Cup, are heading home with one point from their tournament debut but will still leave Russia with their heads held high.Croatia will meet Denmark in the last 16 while Argentina play France. center_img SHARE SHARE EMAIL COMMENTS × Published onlast_img read more

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Illegal Tobacco Seized in Cumberland County

first_imgMore illegal tobacco has been taken off the streets of Nova Scotia following a one-month investigation by Service Nova Scotia’s Compliance and Special Investigations Unit. On Thursday, Feb. 9, following a traffic stop near Amherst, two arrests were made, along with the seizure of a vehicle and 85,000 contraband cigarettes. The estimated provincial tax value of the cigarettes is more than $23,000 and federal tax value is $18,000. The Cumberland District RCMP, officers of the Sûreté du Québec Contraband Tobacco Unit, and officers of the New Brunswick Department of Justice and Public Safety and Contraband Enforcement Unit, assisted Service Nova Scotia with the investigation. Two Halifax-area men, ages 51 and 52, are scheduled to appear in Amherst provincial court on April 27. They will face charges under the Nova Scotia Revenue Act, Excise Act 2001 and the Criminal Code. Service Nova Scotia, through its Audit and Enforcement Section of the Alcohol, Gaming, Fuel and Tobacco Branch, is responsible for reducing illegal tobacco in Nova Scotia by working with its law enforcement partners, and through education and enforcement. Service Nova Scotia’s interprovincial and interagency cooperation with law enforcement partners is a valued asset, as it assists greatly in the fight against contraband tobacco smuggling. Anyone with information about the sale and manufacturing of illegal tobacco is asked to contact their local police or Crime Stoppers. Calls to Crime Stoppers are not taped or traced. If police make an arrest and lay charges based on a tip, callers qualify for a cash reward between $50.00 – $2,000.last_img read more

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Trouble for Kamal Nath as MHA to reopen 1984 riot cases

first_imgNew Delhi: The Union Home Ministry has cleared a proposal to reopen the 1984 anti-Sikh riot cases against Madhya Pradesh Chief Minister Kamal Nath, Delhi’s Shiromani Akali Dal (SAD) MLA Manjinder Singh Sirsa said on Monday. “A big victory for Akali Dal. SIT Opens case against @OfficeOfKNath for his alleged involvement in 1984 Sikh genocide. Notification issued by MHA upon my submission last year, Case number 601/84 to reopen and consider fresh Evidence against Kamal Nath,” Sirsa said in a tweet. Also Read – Uddhav bats for ‘Sena CM’ Sirsa, who is the President of the Delhi Sikh Gurdwara Management Committee (DSGMC), said that a Special Investigation Team (SIT) is investigating the allegations against Kamal Nath. “I thank the SIT for reopening the case. I request the people who were an eyewitness to Kamal Nath killing Sikhs to come forward and become a witness, there is no need to be scared,” he said in another tweet. “Very soon he (Kamal Nath) will be arrested and face the same fate as Sajjan Kumar,” the Akali leader said. Also Read – Farooq demands unconditional release of all detainees in J&K Three-time Congress MP Sajjan Kumar is serving a life sentence for his role in the 1984 anti-Sikh riots. Sirsa also lashed out at the Congress for continuing with Kamal Nath as the Chief Minister of Madhya Pradesh despite his alleged involvement in the 1984 riots targeting the Sikh community. Briefing the media, he urged interim Congress President Sonia Gandhi to seek Kamal Nath’s resignation so that Sikhs get justice for the 1984 riots near Gurdwara Rakab Ganj here. The SIT was formed after Akali leaders, including Union Minister Harsimrat Kaur Badal, had alleged that Kamal Nath had incited violence against Sikhs in 1984 following the assasination of the then Prime Minister Indira Gandhi. The development comes at a time when the Madhya Pradesh Congress is split wide open over the differences between Kamal Nath and Congress strongman Jyotiraditya Scindia.last_img read more

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