Tour of Ireland Graham Watson Stage 2 Photos Up

first_imgGraham Watson’s photos from Stage 2 of the Tour of Ireland are online.  Above, Mark Cavendish (who won today’s stage with a sprint finish) chats with Lance Armstrong.  Russel Downing retains the race lead by 5 seconds.  Armstrong is in 20th overall at 26 seconds down.Check out the full photo gallery here.last_img

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How NFL Star Nnamdi Asomugha Began a New Career on Broadway in A Soldier’s Play

first_imgNnamdi Asomugha(Photos by Caitlin McNaney for Broadway.com) Related Shows “There are a lot of similarities between theater and football just because of how alive it is—breathing the same air as the audience, being in real time and not being able to go back and change something that you did, having to deal with it. In football, you can talk about the 70,000 or 100,000 people that are in the stadium, not to mention the other hundred million that can watch it on TV or YouTube. But in theater, it’s that group right there. It’s immediate for that thousand people, and no one else is going to see what happened in that moment. The similarity is that we’re all in the space together, and we’re all feeding off of each other. You ride a wave with them, the momentum in a play.” Life and Career: Less than 10 years ago, Nnamdi Asomugha was among the most valued players in the National Football League. He was drafted in 2003 by the Oakland Raiders and by 2009, he was regarded by many as the best cornerback in the league and easily the most valuable Raider. In 2011, Asomugah signed with the Philadelphia Eagles. But disorganized coaching and rushed practices tanked Asomugha’s game. In 2013, he retired prematurely from the League. Since then, he’s forged a swift and successful career in entertainment, despite having no interest in performance as a kid. His stage and screen credits include off-Broadway’s Good Grief and the film Fire with Fire, and he was the acclaimed producer and star of Crown Heights. Asomugha is also an executive producer of the Oscar-nominated Harriet. He’s married to fellow actor Kerry Washington. “I was probably in the middle of my career in the NFL when I started to think, ‘OK, what should I be doing next? What should the next avenue be?’ I thought initially that it was going to be in broadcasting, but then I started to fall in love with acting just by doing commercials and getting encouragement from people in the business to pursue it. So, I went into every off-season thinking ‘Let me continue to study acting a little bit.’ I would take a couple of weeks here and there and really dived in.” Show Closed This production ended its run on March 15, 2020 Star Files “I think for a lot of people, you don’t see a football player and think vulnerability. You finish a game and you want to yell and you want to scream because you’re frustrated or you’re excited. But in the moments where you’re in front of the camera, there’s a standard way of responding, especially if you lost the game: we’re going to go back on Monday, we’re going to look at the film, we’ll get better for the next game. But on the inside, you’re going crazy. There’s that level of conditioning that you go through that can really affect you as an actor in a negative way. So I started taking classes, and I just started to find other ways to open up and be as vulnerable an actor as possible.”Charles Fuller spoke about this concept of the double victory: African Americans at that time [during WWII] were trying to win the war for their country, but were also trying to win the war for their race. Being a part of the war meant they could have a chance at a double victory. If we can all come together and fight for America, maybe when the war is over, fellow Americans will see us differently. We all talked about it as a company during rehearsal and shared our views on it. That had a huge impact on me.””It’s not often that you get a play on Broadway where a group of 10 or so African American men can look at each other and laugh, have fun and really talk about things that are difficult within the race, things we don’t expose but are being exposed in this play to a wider audience. I’m just very blessed to be a part of it.”Watch Asomugha talk more about his career change below!Video Player is loading.Play VideoPlayMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration 2:29Loaded: 6.68%Stream Type LIVESeek to live, currently playing liveLIVERemaining Time -2:29 Playback Rate1xChaptersChaptersDescriptionsdescriptions off, selectedCaptionscaptions settings, opens captions settings dialogcaptions off, selectedEnglishAudio Tracken (Main), selectedFullscreenThis is a modal window.Beginning of dialog window. Escape will cancel and close the window.TextColorWhiteBlackRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentTransparentWindowColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyTransparentSemi-TransparentOpaqueFont Size50%75%100%125%150%175%200%300%400%Text Edge StyleNoneRaisedDepressedUniformDropshadowFont FamilyProportional Sans-SerifMonospace Sans-SerifProportional SerifMonospace SerifCasualScriptSmall CapsReset restore all settings to the default valuesDoneClose Modal DialogEnd of dialog window.Close Modal DialogThis is a modal window. This modal can be closed by pressing the Escape key or activating the close button.center_img Warner Miller and Nnamdi Asomugha in “A Soldier’s Play” (Photo: Joan Marcus) A Soldier’s Play Nnamdi Asomugha Age: 38Hometown: Born in Lafayette, Louisiana to Nigerian parents, raised in Los Angeles, California. Current role: Nnamdi Asomugha is making his Broadway debut as Private First Class Melvin Peterson in Charles Fuller’s 1982 Pulitzer Prize-winning drama, A Soldier’s Play. A pivotal player in the story of a black army sergeant who violently abuses his segregated military unit during World War II, Peterson was first portrayed by Denzel Washington at the Negro Ensemble Company in 1981.  View Commentslast_img read more

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$1 million gift from local allumnus creates professorship at UVM

first_imgThe AllEarth 2.2 MW solar farm in South Burlington. Vermont Business Magazine photos. A $1 million gift commitment from alumnus David Blittersdorf will establish a new professorship in the Rubenstein School of Environment and Natural Resources at the University of Vermont.The David Blittersdorf Professorship in Sustainability Science and Policy will be an endowed professorship that will advance the essential elements of a sustainability curriculum at UVM to address the critical issues of fossil fuel depletion, climate change and the development of renewable energy alternatives.Under a suitably blazing sun in front of UVM’s Aiken Center Friday afternoon, Blittersdorf, the president and chief executive officer of AllEarth Renewables, Inc, of Williston, said, “We must transition very quickly to renewables for us to survive as a civilization.”Blittersdorf is a 1981 graduate of UVM’s College of Engineering and Mathematical Sciences. His accomplishments in the wind and solar energy industry define him as a leader in the field both nationally and internationally.While the professorship will reside with the Rubenstein School, Blittersdorf has stated his intent that the incumbent professor seek collaboration with the College of Engineering and Mathematical Sciences.”There is no greater challenge we face than addressing carbon emission, fossil fuel depletion, and our energy future. It’s going to take education, technology, and policy advances for us to be successful,” said Blittersdorf. “I have such high hopes for how UVM and the Rubenstein School will be educating practitioners to tackle the tough energy challenges we face as a state and as a nation.”‘I offer our most sincere thanks to David Blittersdorf for this wonderful new professorship that fits so perfectly with UVM’s established expertise in environment and sustainability,’ said University of Vermont president Tom Sullivan at an announcement ceremony today. ‘The Blitterdorf Professorship is also noteworthy for its interdisciplinary aspect, which complements UVM’s transdisciplinary research foci.’The Rubenstein School is a recognized national leader in advancing experiential learning and interdisciplinary research on the environment and natural resources. The LEED Platinum-certified George D. Aiken Center, home base to the School’s diverse programs, has been recognized in the Chronicle of Higher Education as a leading example of linking sustainability education to practice, including solar trackers that produce nearly half of the building’s electricity needs.Senior environmental sciences major Samanatha Wallace said she came “across the country” from her home in Austin, TX, explicitly to study at the Rubenstein School.”We work to extend the knowledge and practice of sustainability from ideas to application,” said Professor Jon Erickson, Interim Dean of the Rubenstein School. “The Blittersdorf Professorship will support generations of UVM students working on the transition to renewable energy and continue to move our state forward as a leader in the green tech revolution.”last_img read more

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How neurons get their branching shapes

first_imgWhen one end of a microtubule is attached to something, it does not push out new dendritic branches as it grows. However, when microtubules form at no particular site, the opposite is true, and new branches are more likely to form as it grows. Further testing revealed that centrosomin acts as a glue that fixes microtubules, particularly to Golgi bodies, which is why its presence promotes less complex branching.“The shape and complexity of neuronal dendrite arbors are often disrupted in neurological diseases,” notes team leader Adrian Moore. “It turns out the two microtubule regulators we found in this study of Drosophila neurons–centrosomin and pericentrin–are encoded by genes mutated in some human brain disorders. As we learn more about how neurons control the growth of dendrites it will help us understand these diseases more completely, and we may learn how to initiate and direct neuron growth as therapy for diseases and after neuronal injury.” Share on Facebook For more than a hundred years, people have known that dendritic arbors–the projections that neurons use to receive information from other neurons–differ in size and shape depending on neuron type. Now, researchers at the RIKEN Brain Science Institute in Japan have discovered a factor helps shape dendritic arbors. Published in Nature Neuroscience, the work reveals how the protein centrosomin prevents dendrites from branching out.Dendrites grow and branch as structural elements called microtubules push the ends out in specific directions. Microtubules are often likened to cellular scaffolding, and are built on site by growing out from one end. To determine how microtubule growth and dendritic branching is regulated, the researchers examined sensory neurons from Drosophila fruit flies.The scientists focused on a type of Drosophila sensory neuron that has very limited dendritic branching and expresses the transcription factor called Abrupt. Researchers began by determining that expression of Abrupt leads to reduced arbors, while its absence leads to more complex arbors. Next, they tested a group of candidate proteins from the pathway of molecular events initiated by Abrupt, looking for one that regulates microtubules. They found that loss of centrosomin–a protein that makes microtubule-based structures necessary for cell division–resulted in more extensive dendritic branching, and its addition could block the increase in branching caused by lack of Abrupt. The team then discovered that by working with another protein called pericentrin, centrosomin could control where new microtubules form within the dendrites. Email Share on Twittercenter_img LinkedIn Pinterest Sharelast_img read more

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CARICOM team visits TnT as preparations for CARIFESTA XIV heighten

first_imgPreparations for CARIFESTA XIV are in high gear, so much so that members of the organising team from the CARICOM Secretariat went to Trinidad and Tobago to meet with the Host Country Management Committee and observe preparations for the event which is in less than three weeks! Oct 16, 2020 This ultimate regional cultural festival will take place in Trinidad and Tobago 16-25 August 2019. Speaking to the current state of preparations, Deputy Programme Manager, Culture, at the CARICOM Secretariat, Ms. Riane DeHaas-Bledoeg said there was a very good team in Trinidad and Tobago. She said that the Grand Market was being set-up and that based on her observations, it was going to be impressive. CMO says Saint Lucia at critical stage of COVID-19 outbreak Machel Montano one of CARIFESTA XIV’s Brand AmbassadorsMachel Montano is one of the Brand Ambassadors for CARIFESTA XIV, which was launched in fine style on Tuesday night in Trinidad and Tobago. The launch event happened in the Ballroom at the Hilton Hotel and Conference Centre. It was a cultural explosion fitting for the commencement of preparations for…October 24, 2018In “Anguilla”Trinidad and Tobago puts on spectacular show for CARIFESTA XIV openingThe Queen’s Park Savannah in Port-of-Spain Trinidad and Tobago came alive on Friday night with a spectacular display of elaborate performances paying homage to the culture and customs of each Member State and Associate Member of CARICOM. This was the nucleus of the opening ceremony for the fourteenth staging of…August 17, 2019In “Associate Member States”Interim Festival Directorate meets this week on CARIFESTAThe Interim Festival Directorate (IFD) – the body responsible for the planning of CARIFESTA along with the host country management team – is currently hosting its 17th meeting in Trinidad and Tobago. The meeting began on Monday morning at the Trinidad Hilton and Conference Centre in Port-of-Spain. As agreed in…March 25, 2019In “Antigua & Barbuda”Share this on WhatsApp The public can look forward to Signal and Niche events, four Community Festivals, the Grand Market hub, Children and Youth Village, Workshops and Symposia, and the Super Concert featuring the likes of Machel Montano, Shaggy, Kassav, Calypso Rose and Ricardo Drue. CARIFESTA XIV is a cultural melting pot that brings delegations representing the dance, music, craft, visual arts, theatre, film and food from the entire Caribbean to one venue for 10 days. If you are interested in following the events for CARIFESTA XIV, there’s and App for that! Check it out here. CARPHA Partners with, PAHO to Ensure Caribbean States’… Related Posts Oct 16, 2020 “You will indeed feel like you are walking the streets of the Caribbean,” she said.   Members of the Host Country Management Committee for CARIFESTA XIV Minister Gadsby-Dolly (right) and Dr. Hilary Brown from the CARICOM Secretariat in conversation as a member of the HCMC observes the proceedings The CARICOM Secretariat representatives meet with the Host Country Management Team The CARICOM Secretariat team and Members of the Host Country Management Committee Trinidad and Tobago Culture Minister Hon. Nyan Gadsby-Dolly , a member of her team and the host from Tempo Networks pose for a quick photo Programme Manager, Culture and Community Development at the CARICOM Secretariat Dr. Hilary Brown, being interviewed by Tempo Networks Locals and guests will have an opportunity to experience the Caribbean’s many cultures in one mega arts festival via 150 events throughout the twin-island state. Six Eastern Caribbean countries deemed safe for travel – CDC Oct 16, 2020 More information on the event can also be accessed at the CARIFESTA website. Share this:PrintTwitterFacebookLinkedInLike this:Like Loading… last_img read more

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Business Owner Shoots At Burglars In Velarde

first_imgThe business owner who was armed with a handgun confronted the male suspect. The male suspect pointed an object at the business owner. The business owner fired his handgun at the male suspect. It is unknown if the male suspect was injured during the incident. The business owner retreated outside the gas station and waited for State Police officers to arrive.  Officer’s reviewed surveillance video and learned there were two male suspects who broke into the gas station. Both fled the scene through a skylight on the roof of the gas station. New Mexico State Police Crime Scene Unit assisted in this investigation.  NMSP News: Initial investigation shows at about 5:30 a.m., officers responded to a burglary in progress at Mike’s Mini-Mart Gas Station in Velarde. When officers arrived on scene, they encountered the owner of the gas station. Officers learned the business owner, who lives on the property, heard his alarm sounding from his gas station and went to investigate. When the owner arrived at his business, he encountered a male suspect inside the gas station. This investigation is ongoing and no other information is available. Anyone with information on this incident is asked to contact the New Mexico State Police Office in Espanola at 505.753.2277 option 1. The New Mexico State Police investigated a shooting Tuesday involving a business owner in Velarde in Rio Arriba County.last_img read more

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Bill To Relocate State Fire Marshal’s Office Passes House

first_imgHouse Democrats News:SANTA FE — Tuesday, House Bill 386, helping better serve rural and remote communities by making location and organizational changes to the State Fire Marshal’s Office, passed the House. Sponsored by Rep. Nathan Small (D-Las Cruces), the bill seeks to better equip our invaluable emergency managers and to promote public safety by moving the Fire Marshal’s Office to the Department of Homeland Security and Emergency Management (DHSEM). House Bill 386 mirrors Senate Bill 245 sponsored by Sen. William Burt (R-Alamogordo) who has long worked on this issue.The State Fire Marshal Division is a part of the Public Regulation Commission (PRC). With the PRC based in Santa Fe, fire services in the state’s more rural and remote locations have reported lack of communication, staffing vacancies, various delays for investigations and funding deficiencies. House Bill 386 addresses these ongoing concerns expressed by local fire services. Since DHSEM has a presence in all 33 New Mexican counties, this bill allows the Fire Marshal’s Office to collaborate more easily and efficiently with regional partners. “This bill better locates the Fire Marshal’s Office at the request of rural and more dispersed communities in our state,” Rep. Small said. “By offering more training, promotion, and resources statewide to local fire services, we can improve the capacity and efficiency of those who keep New Mexicans safe.”House Bill 386 will now advance to the Senate for consideration.last_img read more

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Foss: Return to economic health won’t happen quickly

first_imgAccording to Bloomberg, 30 percent of U.S. job losses between February and May are the result of reallocation shock. Their analysis “suggests the labor market will initially recover swiftly, but then level off with millions still unemployed.”  My spending declined dramatically during the pandemic, but in recent weeks it’s started ticking up again, and I suspect that’s true for many people. GAZETTE COVID-19 COVERAGEThe Daily Gazette is committed to keeping our community safe and informed and is offering our COVID-19 coverage to you free.Our subscribers help us bring this information to you. Please consider a subscription at DailyGazette.com/Subscribe to help support these efforts.Thank YouThis week I was struck by how lively downtown looked – by how many people were out and about, walking, eating, heading in and out of buildings that were, until very recently, closed to the public. Allowing restaurants to move tables outside has made a huge difference, bringing life to streets that were empty and deserted during the height of the pandemic. If I didn’t know any better, I might look at the surge in activity and conclude that the economy was on the fast track to a full rebound from the recession caused COVID-19-related job losses and shutdowns. Unfortunately, the increased busyness we’re seeing around the Capital Region is a bit of a mirage. Businesses are reopening, and people are spending more. But the hole we fell into was deep, and it’s going to take a long time to climb out. One of the more frightening pieces of news this month came from the Congressional Budget Office, which said it could take nearly a decade for the U.S. economy to recover from the pandemic.  Categories: News, Opinion, Schenectady CountyLast week I did something I hadn’t done in months: I bought lunch. I looked in my refrigerator, found it wanting and decided to order food for pick-up from a restaurant. It was so good that two days later I ordered out again.  How that plays out locally remains to be seen, but I would expect the hospitality, retail and leisure industries to be especially hard hit. Yes, people are doing more. But many of us will continue to take precautions, traveling, eating out and engaging in big social gatherings only sparingly. Some of us might even find that we like preparing our own lunches, and cut back on how much we buy from local eateries. That’s what I plan to do – and I bet others will, too. Another looming problem is the economic strain that millions of Americans are dealing with. Food drives and the moratorium on evictions have helped obscure this reality, but it will soon become hard to ignore. One recent survey, by Apartment List, found that 30 percent of Americans missed their rent payments in June; the mortgage technology and data provider Black Knight reports that nearly 9 percent of mortgages were in forbearance as of June 2, meaning borrowers can skip or make reduced payments.  center_img At the moment, most of our political leaders seem to be banking on a quick recovery, and I’d like to think they’re right to do so. But an accumulation of troubling economic data makes me think they’re in denial about the grueling slog ahead of us. And while it might not last the full 10 years projected by the CBO, it will still be protracted, unpleasant and hard. In a blog post from last week, the Empire Center’s E.J. McMahon described the pace of the state’s recovery as “painfully slow,” and predicted that private-sector employment in New York won’t return to 2019 levels until the middle of 2021. Even more worrisome, there’s good reason to believe that many of the jobs lost during the pandemic are not coming back. A report from Bloomberg Economics suggests that millions of temporary layoffs are at risk of becoming permanent, due to something called reallocation shock, in which “firms and even entire sectors suffer lasting damage. Lost jobs don’t come back and unemployment stays elevated.” How many jobs have disappeared forever? The answer, if accurate, is downright scary.  At some point, all of these bills will come due. Absent more aid to those struggling to adapt to a dramatically altered economic landscape, we will see an explosion in evictions and a jump in foreclosures. It’s nice to see people enjoying a meal out, shopping or getting a haircut. The activity will give the Capital Region a boost – one it badly needs. But our economy has been badly weakened, and we’ll likely be dealing with the fallout for years to come. Reach Sara Foss at sfoss@dailygazette.net. Opinions expressed here are her own and not necessarily the newspaper’s.More from The Daily Gazette:EDITORIAL: Take a role in police reformsNew Cliffside Coaster traces Olympic bobsled course at Mt. Van HoevenbergPolice: Troy man concealed crack cocaine in candy packagingNYCLU seeks to intervene in Schenectady police personnel record caseCapital Region COVID-19 Tracker for Friday, Oct. 16, by countylast_img read more

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Suffolk Summit Addressed Opioid Crisis

first_imgSuffolk County Executive Steve Bellone addressing the “Stories from Suffolk” forum on opioid abuse at the Dormition of The Virgin Mary Greek Orthodox Church in Southampton February 6. Independent/Gianna VolpeThe “Stories from Suffolk” summit hosted by County Executive Steve Bellone and the Rockefeller Institute of Government brought hundreds of people — politicians, police, professors, and priests — to the Dormition of The Virgin Mary Greek Orthodox Church in Southampton on Wednesday, February 6, to discuss the county’s ongoing opioid crisis. It also detailed how $7.5 million in state grant money will be used to expand prevention, treatment, and recovery services combating substance abuse throughout New York.Though the county’s reported opioid deaths in 2018 were nearly half what they were in 2017, falling from 403 to 238, Lieutenant Governor Kathy Hochul said officials won’t be satisfied until that number is reduced to zero. “I’ve been to far too many funerals in the last two years,” Hochul said of those who have died from drug overdoses, adding opioid abuse ultimately claimed her nephew’s life after doctors “over-prescribed” painkillers for an injury the high school student sustained while working part-time at a delicatessen.“Within 14 days, the brain chemistry changes and all of a sudden addiction can set in, whether you wanted it to or not and so taking these prescriptions — getting refills — led to a dependency, loss of job, walking away from school, in and out of jail. It was horrible, and we thought he’d turned a corner,” she said. “He got back to school, got a job, got a girlfriend, was working on his master’s degree. One slippage years later — because of Fentanyl now lacing the drugs — took him like that and his mother found him with a needle in his arm.”The conference’s keynote speaker, Suffolk County District Attorney Timothy Sini, said the justice system is expanding its abilities to identify millions of Fentanyl “analogs” now found in heroin and other street drugs. It is also using the manslaughter statute to target dealers who peddle products resulting in fatalities. “These are people who knew the dangers of the drugs they were selling,” Sini said, adding increased wiretapping and phone seizures has helped stem the tide of opioid deaths.“We have one wiretap that revealed an intercept where the drug dealer said, ‘This has mad bodies on it’ . . . meaning ‘the drugs I’m selling . . . it’s so good it’s killing people,’” Sini said. “They know what they’re doing and they need to be held accountable.” Sini said the county used money seized from drug dealers to purchase a $300,000 Q-Tof Mass spectrometer to identify Fentanyl analogs at the Suffolk County Laboratory. In 2018, 92 arrests were made — with $23,900 in reward money paid — based on tips made to the Suffolk County Police Department’s Crime Stoppers hotline. Sini said the number of executed police search warrants have more than tripled since 2015. “It disrupts drug operations before they get too significant, it takes dangerous drugs off the streets, and in 30 percent of our search warrants, we’re recovering illegal firearms,” the district attorney said.“It also sends a very clear message to the community that we’re not going to stand for this. It empowers people in the community to cooperate with law enforcement and when the Suffolk County Police Department executes a search warrant in your neighborhood, you know about it, because it’s not subtle and that’s the right message,” he added.Sini detailed county programs aimed at providing intervention at every step of the incarceration process, including the Preventing Incarceration Via Opportunities for Treatment program, which resulted in 59 of the 465 individuals referred between November 2017 and 2018 receiving counseling/treatment. Sini said he and Bellone are currently working on a new program called Diversion Opening Opportunities for Recovery Services, which will focus on helping people in the post-arrest, pre-arraignment period.“This is based on a program a lot of you have probably read about in Gloucester, Massachusetts,” the district attorney said of options that will be afforded to some drug offenders following arrest. “They’re given the opportunity to accept treatment as opposed to being put in the criminal justice system. The deal is very simple: If you meaningfully engage treatment, not only will you go home that night — assuming the person is sober — but your appearance in court will be pushed an extra 30 days and, if you continue to meaningfully engage treatment as determined by the medical professionals, your case will bedismissed and sealed.”The post-incarceration “Vivitrol” program seeks to administer medication blocking the effects of opioids for 30 days to offer soon-to-be released inmates an edge over addiction before release. Many of Wednesday’s speakers touted the efficacy of medication-assisted treatment — the use of medication alongside counseling and behavioral therapy — over abstinence-based approaches. Many organizations are focusing on easing public access to medications.For some, abstinence is a goal, said chief counsel Robert Kent of the New York State Office of Alcoholism and Substance Abuse Services. However, he noted, “If it’s a chronic disease and we’re treating people, we’ve got to treat them where they’re at. The one thing we’ve found with what we’re dealing with: If you don’t engage people and connect them to help, they die.”For more information about finding state-certified outpatient or bedded programs with OASAS, visit findaddictiontreatment.ny.gov.@GiannaVolpeReport Sharelast_img read more

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South African Compressed Gases Association (SACGA)

first_imgSubscribe Get instant access to must-read content today!To access hundreds of features, subscribe today! At a time when the world is forced to go digital more than ever before just to stay connected, discover the in-depth content our subscribers receive every month by subscribing to gasworld.Don’t just stay connected, stay at the forefront – join gasworld and become a subscriber to access all of our must-read content online from just $270.last_img

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