CARICOM team visits TnT as preparations for CARIFESTA XIV heighten

first_imgPreparations for CARIFESTA XIV are in high gear, so much so that members of the organising team from the CARICOM Secretariat went to Trinidad and Tobago to meet with the Host Country Management Committee and observe preparations for the event which is in less than three weeks! Oct 16, 2020 This ultimate regional cultural festival will take place in Trinidad and Tobago 16-25 August 2019. Speaking to the current state of preparations, Deputy Programme Manager, Culture, at the CARICOM Secretariat, Ms. Riane DeHaas-Bledoeg said there was a very good team in Trinidad and Tobago. She said that the Grand Market was being set-up and that based on her observations, it was going to be impressive. CMO says Saint Lucia at critical stage of COVID-19 outbreak Machel Montano one of CARIFESTA XIV’s Brand AmbassadorsMachel Montano is one of the Brand Ambassadors for CARIFESTA XIV, which was launched in fine style on Tuesday night in Trinidad and Tobago. The launch event happened in the Ballroom at the Hilton Hotel and Conference Centre. It was a cultural explosion fitting for the commencement of preparations for…October 24, 2018In “Anguilla”Trinidad and Tobago puts on spectacular show for CARIFESTA XIV openingThe Queen’s Park Savannah in Port-of-Spain Trinidad and Tobago came alive on Friday night with a spectacular display of elaborate performances paying homage to the culture and customs of each Member State and Associate Member of CARICOM. This was the nucleus of the opening ceremony for the fourteenth staging of…August 17, 2019In “Associate Member States”Interim Festival Directorate meets this week on CARIFESTAThe Interim Festival Directorate (IFD) – the body responsible for the planning of CARIFESTA along with the host country management team – is currently hosting its 17th meeting in Trinidad and Tobago. The meeting began on Monday morning at the Trinidad Hilton and Conference Centre in Port-of-Spain. As agreed in…March 25, 2019In “Antigua & Barbuda”Share this on WhatsApp The public can look forward to Signal and Niche events, four Community Festivals, the Grand Market hub, Children and Youth Village, Workshops and Symposia, and the Super Concert featuring the likes of Machel Montano, Shaggy, Kassav, Calypso Rose and Ricardo Drue. CARIFESTA XIV is a cultural melting pot that brings delegations representing the dance, music, craft, visual arts, theatre, film and food from the entire Caribbean to one venue for 10 days. If you are interested in following the events for CARIFESTA XIV, there’s and App for that! Check it out here. CARPHA Partners with, PAHO to Ensure Caribbean States’… Related Posts Oct 16, 2020 “You will indeed feel like you are walking the streets of the Caribbean,” she said.   Members of the Host Country Management Committee for CARIFESTA XIV Minister Gadsby-Dolly (right) and Dr. Hilary Brown from the CARICOM Secretariat in conversation as a member of the HCMC observes the proceedings The CARICOM Secretariat representatives meet with the Host Country Management Team The CARICOM Secretariat team and Members of the Host Country Management Committee Trinidad and Tobago Culture Minister Hon. Nyan Gadsby-Dolly , a member of her team and the host from Tempo Networks pose for a quick photo Programme Manager, Culture and Community Development at the CARICOM Secretariat Dr. Hilary Brown, being interviewed by Tempo Networks Locals and guests will have an opportunity to experience the Caribbean’s many cultures in one mega arts festival via 150 events throughout the twin-island state. Six Eastern Caribbean countries deemed safe for travel – CDC Oct 16, 2020 More information on the event can also be accessed at the CARIFESTA website. Share this:PrintTwitterFacebookLinkedInLike this:Like Loading… last_img read more

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Business Owner Shoots At Burglars In Velarde

first_imgThe business owner who was armed with a handgun confronted the male suspect. The male suspect pointed an object at the business owner. The business owner fired his handgun at the male suspect. It is unknown if the male suspect was injured during the incident. The business owner retreated outside the gas station and waited for State Police officers to arrive.  Officer’s reviewed surveillance video and learned there were two male suspects who broke into the gas station. Both fled the scene through a skylight on the roof of the gas station. New Mexico State Police Crime Scene Unit assisted in this investigation.  NMSP News: Initial investigation shows at about 5:30 a.m., officers responded to a burglary in progress at Mike’s Mini-Mart Gas Station in Velarde. When officers arrived on scene, they encountered the owner of the gas station. Officers learned the business owner, who lives on the property, heard his alarm sounding from his gas station and went to investigate. When the owner arrived at his business, he encountered a male suspect inside the gas station. This investigation is ongoing and no other information is available. Anyone with information on this incident is asked to contact the New Mexico State Police Office in Espanola at 505.753.2277 option 1. The New Mexico State Police investigated a shooting Tuesday involving a business owner in Velarde in Rio Arriba County.last_img read more

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Bill To Relocate State Fire Marshal’s Office Passes House

first_imgHouse Democrats News:SANTA FE — Tuesday, House Bill 386, helping better serve rural and remote communities by making location and organizational changes to the State Fire Marshal’s Office, passed the House. Sponsored by Rep. Nathan Small (D-Las Cruces), the bill seeks to better equip our invaluable emergency managers and to promote public safety by moving the Fire Marshal’s Office to the Department of Homeland Security and Emergency Management (DHSEM). House Bill 386 mirrors Senate Bill 245 sponsored by Sen. William Burt (R-Alamogordo) who has long worked on this issue.The State Fire Marshal Division is a part of the Public Regulation Commission (PRC). With the PRC based in Santa Fe, fire services in the state’s more rural and remote locations have reported lack of communication, staffing vacancies, various delays for investigations and funding deficiencies. House Bill 386 addresses these ongoing concerns expressed by local fire services. Since DHSEM has a presence in all 33 New Mexican counties, this bill allows the Fire Marshal’s Office to collaborate more easily and efficiently with regional partners. “This bill better locates the Fire Marshal’s Office at the request of rural and more dispersed communities in our state,” Rep. Small said. “By offering more training, promotion, and resources statewide to local fire services, we can improve the capacity and efficiency of those who keep New Mexicans safe.”House Bill 386 will now advance to the Senate for consideration.last_img read more

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Foss: Return to economic health won’t happen quickly

first_imgAccording to Bloomberg, 30 percent of U.S. job losses between February and May are the result of reallocation shock. Their analysis “suggests the labor market will initially recover swiftly, but then level off with millions still unemployed.”  My spending declined dramatically during the pandemic, but in recent weeks it’s started ticking up again, and I suspect that’s true for many people. GAZETTE COVID-19 COVERAGEThe Daily Gazette is committed to keeping our community safe and informed and is offering our COVID-19 coverage to you free.Our subscribers help us bring this information to you. Please consider a subscription at DailyGazette.com/Subscribe to help support these efforts.Thank YouThis week I was struck by how lively downtown looked – by how many people were out and about, walking, eating, heading in and out of buildings that were, until very recently, closed to the public. Allowing restaurants to move tables outside has made a huge difference, bringing life to streets that were empty and deserted during the height of the pandemic. If I didn’t know any better, I might look at the surge in activity and conclude that the economy was on the fast track to a full rebound from the recession caused COVID-19-related job losses and shutdowns. Unfortunately, the increased busyness we’re seeing around the Capital Region is a bit of a mirage. Businesses are reopening, and people are spending more. But the hole we fell into was deep, and it’s going to take a long time to climb out. One of the more frightening pieces of news this month came from the Congressional Budget Office, which said it could take nearly a decade for the U.S. economy to recover from the pandemic.  Categories: News, Opinion, Schenectady CountyLast week I did something I hadn’t done in months: I bought lunch. I looked in my refrigerator, found it wanting and decided to order food for pick-up from a restaurant. It was so good that two days later I ordered out again.  How that plays out locally remains to be seen, but I would expect the hospitality, retail and leisure industries to be especially hard hit. Yes, people are doing more. But many of us will continue to take precautions, traveling, eating out and engaging in big social gatherings only sparingly. Some of us might even find that we like preparing our own lunches, and cut back on how much we buy from local eateries. That’s what I plan to do – and I bet others will, too. Another looming problem is the economic strain that millions of Americans are dealing with. Food drives and the moratorium on evictions have helped obscure this reality, but it will soon become hard to ignore. One recent survey, by Apartment List, found that 30 percent of Americans missed their rent payments in June; the mortgage technology and data provider Black Knight reports that nearly 9 percent of mortgages were in forbearance as of June 2, meaning borrowers can skip or make reduced payments.  center_img At the moment, most of our political leaders seem to be banking on a quick recovery, and I’d like to think they’re right to do so. But an accumulation of troubling economic data makes me think they’re in denial about the grueling slog ahead of us. And while it might not last the full 10 years projected by the CBO, it will still be protracted, unpleasant and hard. In a blog post from last week, the Empire Center’s E.J. McMahon described the pace of the state’s recovery as “painfully slow,” and predicted that private-sector employment in New York won’t return to 2019 levels until the middle of 2021. Even more worrisome, there’s good reason to believe that many of the jobs lost during the pandemic are not coming back. A report from Bloomberg Economics suggests that millions of temporary layoffs are at risk of becoming permanent, due to something called reallocation shock, in which “firms and even entire sectors suffer lasting damage. Lost jobs don’t come back and unemployment stays elevated.” How many jobs have disappeared forever? The answer, if accurate, is downright scary.  At some point, all of these bills will come due. Absent more aid to those struggling to adapt to a dramatically altered economic landscape, we will see an explosion in evictions and a jump in foreclosures. It’s nice to see people enjoying a meal out, shopping or getting a haircut. The activity will give the Capital Region a boost – one it badly needs. But our economy has been badly weakened, and we’ll likely be dealing with the fallout for years to come. Reach Sara Foss at sfoss@dailygazette.net. Opinions expressed here are her own and not necessarily the newspaper’s.More from The Daily Gazette:EDITORIAL: Take a role in police reformsNew Cliffside Coaster traces Olympic bobsled course at Mt. Van HoevenbergPolice: Troy man concealed crack cocaine in candy packagingNYCLU seeks to intervene in Schenectady police personnel record caseCapital Region COVID-19 Tracker for Friday, Oct. 16, by countylast_img read more

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Suffolk Summit Addressed Opioid Crisis

first_imgSuffolk County Executive Steve Bellone addressing the “Stories from Suffolk” forum on opioid abuse at the Dormition of The Virgin Mary Greek Orthodox Church in Southampton February 6. Independent/Gianna VolpeThe “Stories from Suffolk” summit hosted by County Executive Steve Bellone and the Rockefeller Institute of Government brought hundreds of people — politicians, police, professors, and priests — to the Dormition of The Virgin Mary Greek Orthodox Church in Southampton on Wednesday, February 6, to discuss the county’s ongoing opioid crisis. It also detailed how $7.5 million in state grant money will be used to expand prevention, treatment, and recovery services combating substance abuse throughout New York.Though the county’s reported opioid deaths in 2018 were nearly half what they were in 2017, falling from 403 to 238, Lieutenant Governor Kathy Hochul said officials won’t be satisfied until that number is reduced to zero. “I’ve been to far too many funerals in the last two years,” Hochul said of those who have died from drug overdoses, adding opioid abuse ultimately claimed her nephew’s life after doctors “over-prescribed” painkillers for an injury the high school student sustained while working part-time at a delicatessen.“Within 14 days, the brain chemistry changes and all of a sudden addiction can set in, whether you wanted it to or not and so taking these prescriptions — getting refills — led to a dependency, loss of job, walking away from school, in and out of jail. It was horrible, and we thought he’d turned a corner,” she said. “He got back to school, got a job, got a girlfriend, was working on his master’s degree. One slippage years later — because of Fentanyl now lacing the drugs — took him like that and his mother found him with a needle in his arm.”The conference’s keynote speaker, Suffolk County District Attorney Timothy Sini, said the justice system is expanding its abilities to identify millions of Fentanyl “analogs” now found in heroin and other street drugs. It is also using the manslaughter statute to target dealers who peddle products resulting in fatalities. “These are people who knew the dangers of the drugs they were selling,” Sini said, adding increased wiretapping and phone seizures has helped stem the tide of opioid deaths.“We have one wiretap that revealed an intercept where the drug dealer said, ‘This has mad bodies on it’ . . . meaning ‘the drugs I’m selling . . . it’s so good it’s killing people,’” Sini said. “They know what they’re doing and they need to be held accountable.” Sini said the county used money seized from drug dealers to purchase a $300,000 Q-Tof Mass spectrometer to identify Fentanyl analogs at the Suffolk County Laboratory. In 2018, 92 arrests were made — with $23,900 in reward money paid — based on tips made to the Suffolk County Police Department’s Crime Stoppers hotline. Sini said the number of executed police search warrants have more than tripled since 2015. “It disrupts drug operations before they get too significant, it takes dangerous drugs off the streets, and in 30 percent of our search warrants, we’re recovering illegal firearms,” the district attorney said.“It also sends a very clear message to the community that we’re not going to stand for this. It empowers people in the community to cooperate with law enforcement and when the Suffolk County Police Department executes a search warrant in your neighborhood, you know about it, because it’s not subtle and that’s the right message,” he added.Sini detailed county programs aimed at providing intervention at every step of the incarceration process, including the Preventing Incarceration Via Opportunities for Treatment program, which resulted in 59 of the 465 individuals referred between November 2017 and 2018 receiving counseling/treatment. Sini said he and Bellone are currently working on a new program called Diversion Opening Opportunities for Recovery Services, which will focus on helping people in the post-arrest, pre-arraignment period.“This is based on a program a lot of you have probably read about in Gloucester, Massachusetts,” the district attorney said of options that will be afforded to some drug offenders following arrest. “They’re given the opportunity to accept treatment as opposed to being put in the criminal justice system. The deal is very simple: If you meaningfully engage treatment, not only will you go home that night — assuming the person is sober — but your appearance in court will be pushed an extra 30 days and, if you continue to meaningfully engage treatment as determined by the medical professionals, your case will bedismissed and sealed.”The post-incarceration “Vivitrol” program seeks to administer medication blocking the effects of opioids for 30 days to offer soon-to-be released inmates an edge over addiction before release. Many of Wednesday’s speakers touted the efficacy of medication-assisted treatment — the use of medication alongside counseling and behavioral therapy — over abstinence-based approaches. Many organizations are focusing on easing public access to medications.For some, abstinence is a goal, said chief counsel Robert Kent of the New York State Office of Alcoholism and Substance Abuse Services. However, he noted, “If it’s a chronic disease and we’re treating people, we’ve got to treat them where they’re at. The one thing we’ve found with what we’re dealing with: If you don’t engage people and connect them to help, they die.”For more information about finding state-certified outpatient or bedded programs with OASAS, visit findaddictiontreatment.ny.gov.@GiannaVolpeReport Sharelast_img read more

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South African Compressed Gases Association (SACGA)

first_imgSubscribe Get instant access to must-read content today!To access hundreds of features, subscribe today! At a time when the world is forced to go digital more than ever before just to stay connected, discover the in-depth content our subscribers receive every month by subscribing to gasworld.Don’t just stay connected, stay at the forefront – join gasworld and become a subscriber to access all of our must-read content online from just $270.last_img

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Praxair starts up Peru ASU

first_imgGet instant access to must-read content today!To access hundreds of features, subscribe today! At a time when the world is forced to go digital more than ever before just to stay connected, discover the in-depth content our subscribers receive every month by subscribing to gasworld.Don’t just stay connected, stay at the forefront – join gasworld and become a subscriber to access all of our must-read content online from just $270. Subscribelast_img

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Kuwait Coastal & Marine Engineering Exhibition Approaches

first_imgKuwait Coastal & Marine Engineering Conference and Exhibition (4-5 Dec. 2013, Hilton Kuwait Resort) will be the most comprehensive and in-depth supply of technical and practical insight into the planning, design, development and maintenance of coasts, ports and marine structures, the officials announced.This technical event aims to provide a platform for the exchange of the latest scientific innovations and technical executive achievements by gathering engineers, designers, scientists and researchers in the field of coasts, ports and marine structures. Presentations and case studies will discuss many vital issues related to the operational excellence and environmental sustainability of coastal and marine structures.Key Topics– Hydrodynamic and marine engineering;– Port and coastal management and engineering;– Offshore engineering and pipelines;– Marine environment and safety;– Dredging and land reclamation;– Breakwaters and waterfront development;– New coastal facilities and infrastructure including oil and gas terminals, power stations, desalination plants.[mappress]Dredging Today Staff, September 30, 2013last_img read more

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Blow to criminal bar as QCs kept in accreditation scheme

first_img The period in which candidates must undergo judicial evaluation has been extended from 12 months to 24 months. The number of judicial evaluations that advocates are required to undertake has been harmonised across the scheme. A new level, ‘4QC’, has been introduced to differentiate QCs from other level 4 advocates. The scope of appeals for decisions taken under the scheme has been standardised across the three regulators. The definition of ‘criminal advocacy’ has been reviewed to ensure it includes the necessary categories of criminal work. The joint group said that the scheme will be introduced in phases, given the numbers of advocates involved. Further work will be undertaken to ensure consistency of the rules across the three regulators, the Bar Standards Board (BSB), ILEX Professional Standards and the Solicitors Regulation Authority. A JAG spokeswoman said: ‘In considering the range of responses we received, our focus remained on ensuring a tripartite scheme in the public interest. ‘We remain committed to the introduction of the scheme in 2013 – the September launch date has allowed us to consider the substantive and constructive suggestions we received to make the necessary revisions to the scheme.’ She added: ‘The changes we have made address the responses we received about the proportionality and practicability of the scheme. We will continue to review the scheme once it is operational and will make any further changes as required at the point of the review of the scheme in 2015.’ BSB chair Lady Deech said that the consultation report explains which responses JAG was not able to accommodate, either because ‘they were minority views’ or because they would ‘divert QASA from the legislative objectives that must underpin the scheme’. For example, she said JAG decided to keep silks within the scheme and also to retain an assessment route for advocates who do not undertake trials. Deech explained: ‘This will allow for all criminal advocates to be assessed under the same scheme against the same standards.’ She said: ‘Concerns about non-trial advocates were only expressed for the first time through the process of developing QASA. We now understand that this form of practice has operated for some time without any significant calls for regulatory intervention. ‘The BSB believes it is better to include non-trial advocates in the scheme, and subject their practice to scrutiny alongside all other criminal advocates rather than to let it continue unchecked outside QASA.’ Deech said: ‘It is also important for the comprehensiveness of the scheme for silks to be included. Under the scheme all criminal advocates will have to confirm their competence every five years and there is no compelling case for silks to be exempt from this requirement. ‘However, following feedback the scheme has been amended to include a level 4QC. This will highlight that in addition to having been accredited at level 4 by their regulator they have also been appointed QC as a mark of excellence in practice. She added: ‘Nevertheless, and in response to a number of comments raised in the consultation, the regulators have agreed to open discussions with queen’s counsel appointments on whether there is scope for any continuing quality assurance role for their office in the reaccreditation of QCs in the future.’ Lucy Scott-Moncrieff, president of the Law Society said: ‘Most of the headline items in the latest announcement on QASA from the Joint Advocacy Group were already known. The JAG seems to have tried to address the concerns of the Criminal Bar Association about the position of QCs by creating a separate category for them at Level 4. ‘However the Society always has been adamant that QCs must be covered by the scheme like every other advocate appearing in the criminal courts. ‘The arrangements for appeals under the scheme are new and we will study them. However the fact that the scope for appeals against decisions under the scheme has been standardised across the three regulators is very welcome. In a previous consultation the SRA appeared to be adopting a far more rigid stance to the regulatory changes necessary for QASA to be implemented. ‘At the time the Law Society made the point strongly that there should be no additional regulatory burden for solicitor advocates as compared to barristers.’ The full consultation report is at the BSB site. QCs will have their own discrete level of accreditation in the controversial Quality Assurance Scheme for Advocates (QASA), the Joint Advocacy Group (JAG) announced today. The move will be welcomed by the Law Society, which was adamant that QCs be included in the scheme, but disappoint the Criminal Bar Association, which argued that QCs should not be required to be reaccredited. The JAG today published amendments to the advocacy accreditation scheme, the launch of which has been delayed to September, following an analysis of 348 responses to its fourth consultation. The main changes are:last_img read more

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Finance

first_imgChile: EFE has secured loans worth a total of US$400m to finance electrification, signalling and telecommunications projects under its US$1bn 2003-05 investment programme. US$72m was raised through a bond issue on the local market.China: In May China Development Bank and China Railway Construction Corp signed an agreement for a 20bn yuan development loan and the provision of financial services in 2005-10.France: The funding agreement signed on June 1 for the €107m Tours – Vierzon electrification scheme comprises €60m from the Centre region, €30·1m from the government, €15·8m from the European Union and €1m from RFF. Work was due to begin on the 103 km route in July 2005 for completion at the end of 2007.European Investment Bank has agreed to lend €200m towards the construction of Line 2 of the Montpellier light rail network, now expected to cost €400m following economy measures. The French government had reduced its contribution from €103m to €5m, and further loans are to be provided by Caisse des Déplast_img read more

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