I-CAR Announces 2016 International Board Of Directors And Executive Committee

first_imgI-CAR, the Inter-Industry Conference on Auto Collision Repair, announced its 2016 International Board of Directors and executive committee following its strategic planning session and annual membership meeting in Orlando, Florida, held during the week of March 7. AdvertisementClick Here to Read MoreAdvertisementThe board of directors is comprised of representatives from each of the following six industry segments:collision repair; insurance; OEM vehicle manufacturers; equipment, tools and supplies; education, training and research; and related industry services.James Roach (American Honda Motor Co.) will lead as chair of the executive committee. In addition, the following will serve on the executive committee: Timothy O’Day, Gerber Collision & Glass (vice chair); Chris Evans, State Farm Insurance Co. (treasurer); Mark Woirol, Tech-Cor (secretary); Ron Vincenzi, Oakland Auto Body, A Cooks Collision Company (member-at-large); Eugene Scambray, Copart (member-at-large); and Joseph Laurentino, National General Insurance Co. (immediate past chair).The remaining directors include:­Mark Algie, 3MMark Allen, Audi of AmericaJohn Donley, IAnetJohn Eck, General Motors Co.Jim Guthrie, Car Crafters Inc.Tim Hession, GEICORobert Hills, Universal Technical Institute (UTI)Richard Perry, Chief Automotive TechnologiesRoy Schnepper, Butler’s Collision Inc.Randy Stabler, Pride Collision Centers Inc.Kyle Thompson, USAAMarcy Tieger, Symphony Advisors LLCRick Tuuri, AudaExplore ­- a Solera Company, Education Foundation RepresentativeGary Wano, GW & Son Auto Body, Inc.Michele Wyatt, Mutual of Enumclaw Insurance Co.Roach said, “Every vehicle owner expects that their collision-damaged car will be properly and safely repaired. Our industry is obliged to meet these expectations, despite the challenges posed by more sophisticated and rapidly changing vehicle technology. The I-CAR Board of Directors has never been more committed to fulfilling its vision of providing every person in the industry with the information, knowledge and skills required to perform complete, safe and quality repairs for the ultimate benefit of the consumer.”AdvertisementThe overall strategic direction for I-CAR is set by the board of directors. In addition, the board of directors also assists in obtaining resources in support of the I-CAR Mission.last_img read more

Learn more →

Pluto LNG project contract award

first_imgSubscribe Get instant access to must-read content today!To access hundreds of features, subscribe today! At a time when the world is forced to go digital more than ever before just to stay connected, discover the in-depth content our subscribers receive every month by subscribing to gasworld.Don’t just stay connected, stay at the forefront – join gasworld and become a subscriber to access all of our must-read content online from just $270.last_img

Learn more →

BCGA updates waste management guidance

first_imgSubscribe Get instant access to must-read content today!To access hundreds of features, subscribe today! At a time when the world is forced to go digital more than ever before just to stay connected, discover the in-depth content our subscribers receive every month by subscribing to gasworld.Don’t just stay connected, stay at the forefront – join gasworld and become a subscriber to access all of our must-read content online from just $270.last_img

Learn more →

BG Group Mzia tests show LNG hub development potential

first_imgBG Group said the results from a recently completed second drill-stem test (DST) on the Mzia discovery in Block 1, offshore southern Tanzania, provided further support for a hub development to supply a potential onshore LNG project.The DST on the Mzia-3 appraisal well, drilled in approximately 1 800 metres of water around six kilometres north of the original Mzia-1 discovery, included sustained gas production at a maximum flow rate of 101 million standard cubic feet per day (mmscfd), equivalent to approximately 17 000 barrels of oil equivalent per day (boed).In May 2013, BG Group announced a test on the Mzia-2 well, the first done on a Cretaceous discovery in deep water offshore Tanzania, had flowed at an equipment-constrained rate of 57 mmscfd, or around 9 500 boed.Sami Iskander, BG Group’s Chief Operating Officer, said, “The excellent results from this latest drill-stem test further reduce reservoir risk, a critical factor as we progress design of the upstream production facilities and infrastructure. Also, the Mzia-3 DST, along with previous appraisal activities, supports our efforts to optimise the value of a development across our Block 1 discoveries.”Mzia, discovered in 2012, is a multi-layered field of Upper Cretaceous age with a gross gas column in excess of 300 metres. The Mzia and Jodari discoveries in Block 1 are estimated to hold around 9 trillion cubic feet (tcf) of total gross recoverable resources, with around 15 tcf of total gross recoverable resources, around 2.5 billion boe, across Blocks 1, 3 and 4.The drill ship, the Deepsea Metro-1, will now move north to complete the exploration and appraisal programme on the Block 4 discoveries by drilling the Kamba-1 well.BG Group has a 60% interest in, and is operator of, Blocks 1, 3 and 4 offshore Tanzania, with Ophir Energy holding 20% and Pavilion Energy 20%. Press Release, August 27, 2014; Image: BG Grouplast_img read more

Learn more →

Flight and fight

first_imgSubscribe now for unlimited access Get your free guest access  SIGN UP TODAY To continue enjoying Building.co.uk, sign up for free guest accessExisting subscriber? LOGIN Stay at the forefront of thought leadership with news and analysis from award-winning journalists. Enjoy company features, CEO interviews, architectural reviews, technical project know-how and the latest innovations.Limited access to building.co.ukBreaking industry news as it happensBreaking, daily and weekly e-newsletters Subscribe to Building today and you will benefit from:Unlimited access to all stories including expert analysis and comment from industry leadersOur league tables, cost models and economics dataOur online archive of over 10,000 articlesBuilding magazine digital editionsBuilding magazine print editionsPrinted/digital supplementsSubscribe now for unlimited access.View our subscription options and join our communitylast_img read more

Learn more →

Not so disastrous?

first_imgTo continue enjoying Building.co.uk, sign up for free guest accessExisting subscriber? LOGIN Stay at the forefront of thought leadership with news and analysis from award-winning journalists. Enjoy company features, CEO interviews, architectural reviews, technical project know-how and the latest innovations.Limited access to building.co.ukBreaking industry news as it happensBreaking, daily and weekly e-newsletters Get your free guest access  SIGN UP TODAY Subscribe to Building today and you will benefit from:Unlimited access to all stories including expert analysis and comment from industry leadersOur league tables, cost models and economics dataOur online archive of over 10,000 articlesBuilding magazine digital editionsBuilding magazine print editionsPrinted/digital supplementsSubscribe now for unlimited access.View our subscription options and join our community Subscribe now for unlimited accesslast_img read more

Learn more →

Kulagina joins VESTA

first_imgVESTA-Kazakhstan is part of the VESTA group, an international freight forwarding, transport and logistics company headquartered in Moscow, Russia.www.lcvesta.comlast_img

Learn more →

NFL curbs fantasy football marketing to youths

first_img NEW YORK (AP) – The NFL has agreed to curtail its marketing of fantasy football to children ages 6 to 12.Last season, the league marketed fantasy football to youngsters on its NFL Rush Fantasy website and app, offering cash prizes and game consoles to contest winners. It also promoted an elementary school curriculum that encouraged children to play the fantasy game.The NFL confirmed Wednesday it has informed several advocacy groups that it will make significant changes to the game. The school curriculum based on the game has been discontinued and the league has promised it will not promote fantasy sports in schools in the future.“We are pleased that the NFL has agreed to make these changes, and young children will no longer have a financial stake in the outcome of its games,” said Josh Golin, executive director of the Campaign for a Commercial-Free Childhood. “It is also good news for parents that the league will no longer enlist teachers and schools in an effort to get children into the habit of playing fantasy sports.” Published: July 13, 2016 3:03 PM EDT Updated: July 13, 2016 3:10 PM EDT NFL curbs fantasy football marketing to youths SHARE Do you see a typo or an error? Let us know.last_img read more

Learn more →

My hope for Chris Grayling

first_img Follow Eduardo on Twitter Eduardo Reyes is Gazette features editor Maybe the new justice secretary is about to have an expensive re-education. I admit that on his record he is not an obvious ‘rule of law’ groupie. On past form, he thinks it’s fine to shoot robbers in the back when they are running away. He was famously a bit of a fan of some bed & breakfasts staying homosexual-free. At the Department for Work and Pensions, the ministry he now leaves, he deployed the rather cryptic logic that Parkinsons sufferers who had benefits removed ‘go to appeal’ in large numbers ‘because they have the opportunity to do so’. And in July he complained to civil servants at the Ministry of Justice that an MoJ video showing people how to appeal against benefits decisions that had gone against them was too informative. But there is hope. Like an obese yet opinionated football fan, it is much easier to hold ridiculous notions about how to get on and do stuff from a safe distance. So here’s the hope. That long hours spent locked away with officials who say things like, ‘but minister, that’s not what the European Court of Human Rights judgment said,’ might help. Responsibility for reoffending rates may make him wonder why prison doesn’t work very well (‘we have to find a better way,’ he might mutter to his permanent secretary). He might even notice that the City’s largest law firms, each of them exporters and advisers to the sort of right-thinking big business the average capitalist doesn’t mind, support and understand gay rights and the anti-discrimination laws that underpin them. Maybe he’ll get cornered by a commercial litigator who tells him unrepresented claimants cost their clients more than represented ones – or a pro bono fan from a big corporate firm who thinks the legal aid cuts were a bit rubbish. He might visit a CAB and see the queue – hell Grayling might even win a court case (perhaps even in Europe), in which case it’ll be hug-a-judge time. So I’m optimistic – this is a journey that really might broaden a mind. last_img read more

Learn more →

Insolvency body pleads for Jackson exemption to stay

first_imgCreditors – including HM Revenue & Customs – could lose more than £150m a year if the government applies the Jackson reforms to insolvency cases, a new report claims.Research commissioned by R3, a trade body for insolvency professionals, found litigation currently brings in £300m a year from insolvent businesses.Of this, up to £70m relates to money owed to HMRC, with the rest owed to businesses.The report found the majority of claims relate to cases worth less than £50,000, which are unlikely to be pursued if success fees and ATE insurance premiums have to be paid out of any damages awarded, as stipulated by the Jackson reforms, which came into force last April.CFA-backed insolvency litigation currently realises around £150m every year, the report added.The government had exempted insolvency claims from the Jackson reforms but plans to apply the new rules from next April.Philip Sykes, deputy vice-president of R3, accused the government of ‘lazy thinking’ by applying blanket rules to every type of litigation. ‘Insolvency litigation is absolutely in the public interest, and it is absurd that the government is considering making it all but impossible for such cases to continue,’ said Sykes.‘The government’s only justification for ending the exemption is that it would make the Jackson reforms consistent across the board, regardless of the consequences.’Sykes said the threat of having costs recovered from directors encourages them to settle cases before they reach court, reducing legal fees and ensuring higher returns for creditors.Without the threat of recoverable costs, he warned, directors will know creditors cannot afford to take the case to court to retrieve funds.He added: ‘Insolvency litigation returns money to creditors, and helps ensure businesses and banks remain confident about lending. It protects taxpayer funds, it stops directors making off with money that isn’t theirs, and it deters directors from even thinking about doing so in the first place.‘Should the exemption be removed, only a few large cases involving wealthy, motivated creditors would go ahead. SMEs and taxpayers would lose out – and irresponsible directors would be laughing.’The report, by Professor Peter Walton of the University of Wolverhampton, was commissioned by R3.It had the support of the Association of Chartered Certified Accountants, the Insolvency Practitioners Association, the Institute of Chartered Accountants in England and Wales, the Institute of Chartered Accountants Scotland, claims specialists JLT Specialty, solicitors Moon Beever, and accountants Moore Stephens LLP.last_img read more

Learn more →