A dream revived – Shimona Nelson revels in assistance from CB/UWI Fund Run

first_img“When I was told (about it), I could hardly believe my good fortune.” So said nationally recognised student-athlete Shimona Nelson, one of 40 recipients of scholarships in this year’s renewal of the CB/UWI 5K RunWalk and Smart Eggs Kids K, which events were launched last Tuesday morning at the UWI Regional Headquarters in Kingston. Responding on behalf of her fellow recipients, sports psychology student Shimona, who is a national representative in both netball and basketball, spoke of the challenges facing her both as a student and an athlete. “It has been very stressful for me not knowing how I was going to continue to fund my education.” she said. So much so, that the second year student once thought her dream of practicing sports psychology had hit a dead end. By removing the financial burden, the CB Group award, she said, has made it much easier for her to apply herself in the dual role of student-athlete. In addition to playing goal-shooter on the netball court, Nelson also has a pivotal role in basketball, putting her height and athleticism to use as a centre player. Her netball talent took her all the way to Botswana where she was part of the Under-21 Sunshine Girls and was named Most Valuable Player, and she now has an invitation to play in the upcoming Fast5 Netball World Series in Australia. But her sporting exploits do not stop there. The 18-year-old has also tried her hand at the javelin event and is looking to increase her involvement in that discipline, but not at the expense of her studies. Nelson is committed to maintaining the grade point average (GPA) in excess of 3.0, that saw her being selected in the first place and going on to realise her dream of motivating and counselling other athletes. Deeply appreciative “Like the other recipients, I am deeply appreciative, and I certainly will not let this unique opportunity be wasted.” The launch also saw a video with comments and testimonials from the 2017 awardees. CB CEO Matthew Lyn had a somewhat optimistic instruction for the scholarship awardees gathered for the launch of the sixth annual CB Group/UWI 5K RunWalk and Smart Eggs Kids K. “Be flexible, be open to opportunities that may lie outside of your degree focus or your major. Keep an open mind,” he said in congratulating the beneficiaries. The company, Lyn, said, believed thoroughly in education as the primary vehicle for national development and thus was proud and pleased to be associated with the event, which he said, was now – after five stagings finding its rhythm.last_img read more

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Independent identity

first_imgAt Independence, it was said with some regret, “We inherited a state but not a nation” yet our national motto declared: “One Nation, One People, One Destiny”. Even if it was merely aspirational, it confirmed the colonial assumption that an independent country was not just a territorial expression but one containing a populace with a common identity that made them into a “nation”. The organisation formed after WWII to accommodate the expected decolonisation wave, after all, was called the “United Nations”.The State System that evolved in Europe after the Treaty of Westphalia in 1648 when the Holy Roman Empire dissolved, introduced the principle of “cuiusregio, eiusreligio” – the religion of the king is the religion of the people. In effect, with the pervasiveness of religion in the lives of the people in the individual states, but with the abandonment of a common language, Latin, each country evolved separate and distinct “cultures”. During the colonial era from the 17th to 20th Century, the inhabitants of European colonies were expected to imbibe and practise the cultures of the “mother country”.To become “one nation” at Independence, it was expected that all the people of Guyana would practise one culture – British culture. In fact, before Independence, an anthropologist, RT Smith explained our ability to live together, even though we were “the land of six races”, was because everyone had a “white bias” in our world view. Our early leaders Dr Cheddi Jagan and Forbes Burnham rejected much of the “white bias” as a “colonial mentality”, but their Marxist-based ideology still assumed the ideal of “one people”. Their “class bias” articulated the aspiration as “the small man is the real man”.It was quite ironic even though these early leaders wanted a “unity” in the people, in order to secure political power they used whatever means at their disposal. One of those “means” was while all citizens might have had a “white bias” and used the language and premises of the “whites” to evaluate each other, they yet saw themselves as different because of their insertion into the country at different times and the different cultural repertoires they arrived with. In recognition of this reality, another anthropologist, MG Smith defined us as a “plural society”: the peoples of Guyana may live in one country, but expressed themselves through institutions that were significantly different because of religion and culture. In other words, we were ethnically different.And it was along these ethnic cleavages the politicians mobilised before and after Independence. However, they introduced a schizophrenic element into the self-definition of Guyanese by publicly avowing our “unity” and “one nation, one people” while in private courting voters along ethnic lines.Evidently reacting to this schizophrenic labelling of “identity” that has long fractured the country’s developmental efforts, the new APNU/AFC Government articulated as one of its major goals, the achievement of greater “social cohesion” in the society. It created a Ministry within the Ministry of the Presidency to achieve this state of affairs and on May 11 launched the first “National Social Cohesion Day”.Delivering the feature address with much of his Cabinet and the diplomatic corps present, President David Granger declared: “Social cohesion recognises that our nation is now and always will be multi-religious, multi-ethnic and multi-cultural. Miscegenation is forever and I have recently seen the results of my DNA test so I’m forever mixed. Our diversity is an asset not a liability; we are proud to belong to a society of many faiths. We are proud of the tapestry of our ethnicity.”It would appear that the President is clearly articulating a more nuanced vision of what our nation can be – a hyphenated rather than a claustrophobic, arbitrary “unitary” one. His comment about “miscegenation”, however, needs explication. Our Nobel Prize winning poet Dereck Walcott said, “Miscegenation means there’s something wrong genetically. Miscegenation is not an idea that we would have in the Caribbean.”last_img read more

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“We Are Not Guilty”

first_img“We are not guilty, say over 25 defendants formally charged, indicted and facing trial at the 2nd Judicial Circuit Court in Grand Bassa County. They have taken issue with the state to prove them guilty of multiple crimes.The defendants pleaded not guilty when the contents of the indictment were read to them last week, during the trial processing conducted by the clerk of the court, Emmanuel Quahgar.The multiple crimes include armed robbery, theft of property, obstruction of government function, criminal mischief, riot, failure to disperse, disorderly conduct, obstructing highway, criminal conspiracy and other public tresspasses.Those indicted are Fred Saye, Jonathan Paye , Yei Dokie , Prince Lah, Prince Zeadah , Emmanuel Torbaye , Romeo  Zuweh , Romeo  Swah , Wilson Gono , Zuo Gbealah , Peter Zuah, Alano Kortoe and Yei Brown.Others are William Gbandeah, Saye Jebdole , George S.K.  Dolo, Melvin Zeantoe, Saye Tee, Zuweh, Patrick Gongar, Junior Musa, Oretha Gono, Saye Garteh and others to be identified. They were all accused, charged and indicted for having conspired to commit the various mentioned crimes.  The indictment was prepared by the Special Grand Jurors of the 8th Judicial Circuit Court in Nimba County under the signature of County Attorney, Hector Quoigoah.According to the indictment, the defendants did conspire and commit the aforesaid crimes which violate chapter 17 Section 17.1, 17.3, 12.1 17.7 and Chapter 10 Section 4(1, 2, 3, 4, respectively of the New Penal Law of Liberia, Chapter 26 of the Liberian Code in the form and manner.The indictment revealed that the Tokadeh Progressive Youth Development Association in Nimba wrote Nimba County Attorney Quoigoah on June 27, 2014, informing him that their group would carry out a march on July 3, 2014, but he dishonored it saying that the notice was too short and they would not allow the police to protect the march.He directed the youth group to call off the plan because, according to him, the defendants, headed by one Othello Bontor and others to be identified, had  intended to cause public disturbance, damage and carry away properties of ArcelorMittal and AFCONS  and physically obstruct the enforcement of the law and gather at Banlaw (TNF) junction  near Gbarpa, fell trees and create roads blocks, thereby restricting free movement of traffic, violently exhibiting cutlasses, sticks and other lethal instruments and carry stones.Thereafter, security officers, including the Liberia National Police, engaged defendant Othello Bontor and colleagues in a peaceful manner and tried to persuade them to unblock the road, but they reigned insults and threw stones at the security personnel.The indictment indicated  that at 6:25 a.m. on July 3, 2014, the defendants, headed by Saye Toe Zuweh and Peter Zuweh, the president of the organization, despite the County Attorney’s mandate  that they should call off the plan, damaged and carried away properties of ArcelorMittal and Afcons, caused public disturbances and physically obstructed the enforcement of laws, fell trees with power saws, created road blocks, with cutlasses, sticks, threw stones, while mask  dancers displayed traditional  war dances.  The defendants further chanted threatening slogans, the indictment disclosed.At about 12:00 noon, on July 12, 2014, County Attorney Quoigoah, amid the growing number of demonstrators and  the violent nature of their actions, tried to calm the situation at Tokadeh Junction, but he was booed at by the defendants and other demonstrators yet to be identified,  which resulted to releasing teargas  on the demonstrators by the police.According to the indictment, the demonstrators deranged, looted and set ablaze properties of Afcons, SEGAL and ArcelorMittal valued at over US$5,000,000 and police subsequently arrested and charged the defendants. They also trenched and entrapped employees of the said entities at Tokadeh mines for over 24 hours.Following this, the Special Grand Jury of the 8th Judiciary Circuit Court in Nimba County, transferred the case to Grand Bassa County based upon a motion for change of venue to Grand Bassa, which was granted by then presiding Judge, J. Boima Kortu. Meanwhile, the commencement of the trial proceedings on March 2, 2015, at the 2nd Judicial Circuit Court in Grand Bassa County, was presided over by Judge Yussif Kaba, while the state is being represented by the Ministry of Justice. Share this:Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)last_img read more

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Hotshots in crucial tiff with Fuel Masters

first_imgLATEST STORIES No need to wear face masks in Metro Manila, says scientist 2 village execs nabbed in Bohol buy-bust DSWD Bicol donates P1.5M worth of food packs for Taal eruption evacuees Magnolia, the defending champion that struggled in the PBA Governors’ Cup eliminations, shoots for a crucial victory when it clashes with Phoenix Pulse at Cuneta Astrodome, with the Hotshots to also use the game to break in new acquisition Chris Banchero.With a 4-4 record and needing to sweep its last three games for a chance at a twice-to-beat privilege in the first round of the playoffs, Magnolia cannot afford to lose its 7 p.m. clash with the Fuel Masters, who are also in a must-win situation just to keep their flickering playoff hopes alive.ADVERTISEMENT 400 evacuees from Taal eruption take refuge in Mt. Banahaw MOST READ SEA Games 2019: Philippines clinches historic gold in women’s basketball PLAY LIST 05:02SEA Games 2019: Philippines clinches historic gold in women’s basketball06:27SEA Games 2019: No surprises as Gilas Pilipinas cruises to basketball gold02:43Philippines make clean sweep in Men’s and Women’s 3×3 Basketball01:04Daybreak as smoke, ash billows from Taal volcano01:05Poor visibility, nakaapekto sa maraming lugar sa Batangas03:028,000 pulis sa Region 4-A, tuloy ang trabaho03:57Phivolcs, nahihirapan sa komunikasyon sa Taal01:04Sold-out: Stores run out of face masks after Taal spews ash01:45Iran police shoot at those protesting plane shootdown Nationals in impressive debut Taal Volcano’s lava fountain weakens, but Phivolcs says it’s not sign of slowing down Phivolcs: Cloud seeding in ashfall affected areas needs study Lava gushes out of Taal Volcano as villagers flee ‘People evacuated on their own’ View comments Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. The Beermen will be the heavy favorites to turn back the Elite, who dealt away a lot of their stars starting with No. 2 overall pick Ray Parks and gunslinger Allein Maliksi and two others.San Miguel lost to Meralco and NorthPort in succession last week.Sports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Next Banchero, just three days after being traded by Alaska, comes to a Magnolia side that is loaded at the guard spot. And whether he fits in the rotation will get a partial answer.Coach Chito Victolero admitted the other day that they really didn’t have a need for another guard, but when the offer to acquire Banchero came, he said that he would be foolish to pass this one up.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSAndray Blatche has high praise for teammate Kai SottoSPORTSBig differenceSPORTSAlmazan status stays uncertain ahead of Game 4Paul Lee and Marc Barroca are the premier point guards of the team, which could force the hand of Victolero to play Banchero at the shooting guard spot.Meanwhile, San Miguel Beer, reeling from back-to-back losses, slugs it out with Blackwater in the 4:30 p.m. contest.last_img read more

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Free Showing of Andy’s Rainbow in Heltonville, C’burg

first_imgMundell Church is offering a free dinner and viewing of the movie ‘Andy’s Rainbow’ at the church on Sunday.Dinner will be served at 5 p.m. with the movie viewing at 6 p.m.There will be another showing at the Westview Christian Church in Campbellsburg on Jan. 29 at 6p.  A third local showing will be at Mt. Tabor Church on Feb. 12 at 6p. Jaboc Dufour who acts in the film is from Salem also wrote the film. It was director by his brother, Adam. The movie from the award-winning creators of “The Redemption of Benjamin Black” comes a story of grace, love, and friendship. When Rayne Davis, a rebellious teenage girl, is sentenced to 50 hours of community service at a local group home for special needs youth, she wonders if life can get any worse. Then she meets Andy, a young mentally handicapped man whose profoundly simple insights on life, death, and God soften her heart and help her look at life with newfound optimism.last_img read more

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WE ARE THE COPS, Part 6: The Lawyer

first_img“Emily.” (Derek Ruttan/The London Free Press) It’s occurred to her that while she’s been struggling, Paquette has drawn a good salary — more than $115,000 a year — while reassigned to administrative duties, and later off on medical leave.“He could have paid for my master’s program that I can’t get into, because I’m too poor,” Emily jokes. “I’m trying to make my life here. But, again, I try not to think about it.”In spring 2018, she gave McLean written permission to discuss this case with The Free Press.In the hospital interview, McLean asks about her. The two hadn’t spoken since McLean called her about a year earlier to tell her he was off the case.“She is responsible enough to know she did something wrong. I’m glad it turned out for her,” he says.“I liked her. She was a sweet kid. She was one of the ones who brought a smile to my face, a kind of ironic smile sometimes. You couldn’t not like her.”After the surgery, McLean underwent radiation. But the cancers spread.“I’ve basically been in the hospital ever since, except for a few days here and there,” he says. “It all just kind of blew up.”Partway through the hour-long conversation, his doctor comes into the room to check on him.“This is a reporter. He’s not here to talk about you,” he jokes with her.A nurse comes by later to see if he’s ready for a bath.“I’m going to get the spa treatment,” McLean tells me, wry to the end.Near the end of his interview, McLean tries to remember someone he wants me to check out.“I’ll remember it someday,” he says. “Good luck with this story.”Seven weeks after the interview, on July 12, 2018, McLean died. He was 67.In a Free Press story about his death, colleagues praised the sharp legal mind and soft heart that helped his clients.Emily was one of his last clients, if not his last.“I was lucky, really lucky,” she says. “I owe it all to Craig. He went out of his way for me.”The summer McLean died, Emily moved to Toronto with the boyfriend who’d stuck with her after the arrest. He’s beginning his career; she’s working as a bartender, as she’s done for years.“It’s not really a trigger,” she says. “Every night that I finish work, there is somebody walking out the door that is going to make a really bad decision. It puts some perspective in me.”She’s looking for a new career. She hasn’t had a drink since the night of the assault. It’s a plot twist, Paquette’s assault on her.“That experience was so traumatic. I was so beat up I couldn’t move for days. I was on probation for a year. I couldn’t work in my field,” she says in a recent interview.“There were a lot of factors that helped with my sobriety. As much as it’s a horrible thing, I wouldn’t have had this life right now if he didn’t do that. I know that for a fact.”For more than a year, Emily has waited for The Free Press to publish this story.She has shown patience through interviews and re-interviews, carefully answered dozens and dozens of questions, and maintained her composure despite the anxiety caused when it seemed a legal application by the police officer who assaulted her could reveal her name. Paquette did not serve her with the application materials.In the papers Emily collected to prove in court that she was a decent person is a clue to the tenacity she shared with McLean. It’s a letter of commendation written by the head of an organization several years ago.When Emily was 17, she was visiting with a volunteer group when it was “viciously attacked” in a park, the letter says. Two assailants tried to throw a volunteer over a railing onto a road below.Emily pulled one assailant off the victim, then threw herself between the other assailant and the victim. She was punched in the face, suffering a split lip, but held her ground until a passing police car was flagged down.She prevented a volunteer being badly hurt, or even killed, the letter says. Emily stepped in. She spoke. She acted.“I always try to be someone that if I see something, I try to say something,” Emily says.Hence, the telling of this story — not the once-upon-a-time version first told by police, or the limited version sought later by Paquette — but the real story.A story about police brutality and police silence, about the veteran lawyer and struggling woman who fought for the right ending.In that sad and happy ending, a story about one life passing and one life reborn.rrichmond@postmedia.comDo you any feedback on WE ARE THE COPS, our six-part investigation? We always want to hear from readers. Email us your thoughts at lfp.feedback@postmedia.comRead WE ARE THE COPS from the beginning by clicking here Assault victim’s ‘legal ghost’ came to haunt police attackerA dogged, dying London lawyer pried loose video revealing an ugly cellblock assault, clearing his client and leading to a cop’s conviction.Lawyer Craig McLean sits in a hospital bed in a palliative care unit, his legal gown replaced by a hospital gown, but no less wry and sharp than he was in a courtroom.To a reporter looking for a place to rest, he looks at one seat and quips, “That’s a commode.”Guiding the reporter to safety, he begins to chat.“I’m a lot better than I was. I came in here feeling kind of ill and two days later, they’re (surgeons are) cutting my head open,” he says, then adds with a chuckle, “so it surprised me.”Story continues belowThis advertisement has not loaded yet,but your article continues below.It’s taken a few months to find McLean.He used to be easy to locate: Just head to the London courthouse, where the tenacious defence lawyer could be found gliding through the halls in his Superior Court robes or in court, carefully arguing cases.But he’s a private man, and, in sickness, protected by family and friends.They must check with McLean first, before letting a reporter know he’s in hospital and willing to tell a story about a “sweet kid” who came into his office in fall 2016.The “sweet kid” was 24 at the time, a woman The London Free Press is calling Emily to protect her identity.She was in trouble, charged with assaulting police and resisting arrest.When she went to court for the first time, on Oct. 20, 2016, she was tempted to accept a Crown offer, Emily says.If she pleaded guilty to assaulting the officers and breaking a window, the resisting arrest charge would be dropped, according to documents obtained by The Free Press. She would receive a suspended sentence, leaving her with a criminal record. She’d go on probation and have to provide “some significant community service hours and restitution.”But a relative recommended she visit McLean instead.McLean remembers a “little thing, weighing about 90 pounds,” coming into his office saying she was charged with assaulting police.We Are The Cops, extra: Expert: Police culture must be reviewed, reformed READ IT HERE“It reeked. It reeked,” he recalls from his hospital bed. “It stunk. She had a big black eye. Little girls like that don’t attack whole cell staffs.”A lawyer for 35 years, McLean had a reputation for taking his cases to court rather than taking a quick plea deal.“At first, she just wanted to go in and plead guilty,” he says. “And I remember saying that would be a dumb thing to do. I was quite strong in what I said to her, more than what I normally would be, because I thought it was such bull. She has ambitions and plans. With a conviction, it would have been tough for her.”Emily remembers that first meeting with McLean.She made too much as a server to qualify for legal aid, but too little, especially with a student loan from university, to afford a lawyer.“I had no way to pay for one. I drained all my accounts the first time I saw him and gave him every dollar I had just for the $500 retainer,” she says. “After that, he never asked for anything again. I never got a bill.”A few days after their first meeting, McLean received disclosure from the Crown: statements of officers involved in the arrest.“I just couldn’t believe what was there. It just didn’t make sense,” he says. “She was a raving lunatic, according to the disclosure. She was kicking the police, trying to boot them, minus shoes. It’s hard to imagine she would be a danger to multiple police officers with guns in cells.”According to some of the police witness statements obtained by The Free Press, Emily kicked an officer in the stomach several times, pushed, bit and spit at other officers, and “struggled violently.”McLean began the long battle to get the Crown to obtain and release the police surveillance video from the station the morning of the arrest.“They (the Crown) were so slow in response to my request for video. Nobody ever said no, but it was very, very slow. It was so slow, that stunk, too,” he says. “They (police) don’t like to disclose those videos, usually because there is something on it that doesn’t put them in a good light.”Emily recalls sitting in McLean’s office, while he talked about the video.“He was saying, ‘I can’t get those videos.’ He was a closed man. Tapping his pen on the desk, frustrated, very frustrated,” she says.She had qualms about the video, because she knew it would show her own poor behaviour.“I kept saying, ‘I hope they don’t find those videos.’ And Craig is saying, ‘No, we want to find those videos.’”While McLean fought her legal battle, Emily fought her internal battles.She knew she’d been a good person once. She’d been volunteering since she was a teenager. She travelled to another country to work with children. She worked hard at school and got good marks. But anxiety and depression came with the drive to excel.Like everyone else her age, she drank at weekend house and bush parties. What else was there to do in a small town?In university, her anxiety grew. Her solution was right at hand. Her family income was limited and despite getting a few small bursaries, Emily had to work full-time to pay tuition and expenses, so she got a job tending bar.“I was going from school to work to school to work to school again. I was trying to save money and pay for everything and then trying to stay in school, and then I was trying to party at the same time, so I got really out of control where I was so tired all the time and using alcohol to give me an extra edge.”First, she just had a few more than she should. Beer a little earlier in the day than usual. A couple of shots before class.Her marks started to fall. When she drank, she got crazy. She confronted people to get a rise out of them. She lied to her friends. She lost professors’ respect.The manager of the bar where she worked called her parents and suddenly she was pulled out of school, her courses unfinished, her future in tatters, back in London under the watch of family.“I felt like a complete failure,” she says. “I was so shameful and angry with myself for falling apart.”In London, she and her family tried to get her into rehab. She was bounced from counsellor to counsellor. No one seemed to fit.“It really takes its toll because you’re letting your heart out, and then you’re passed on and it gets to this point where there isn’t a resolution. I was just coming up roadblocks every time.”But that wasn’t the biggest problem, she knows.“I couldn’t stay away from alcohol long enough. I could go a few days without it, or even a week or two, but I would always come back,” she says. “I was relapsing closer and closer together and they were getting more and more out of control. It really started spiralling really, really fast and I didn’t seem to have any control over it.”Drinking made her more miserable, angry at herself for leaving school, for continuing to drink, for not seeing the danger signs and getting help sooner, for destroying the life she’d worked so hard to create.So she drank more.After her arrest, her mother gave her an ultimatum: Give up booze or give up your family.On her mother’s orders, she started going to Alcoholics Anonymous meetings. For weeks after the assault, she did little more than sleep, get a ride to AA meetings, then go back to sleep.Shame, as much as her 7 p.m. daily curfew — a condition of her release by police — kept her home at night.“I just cut off all connections to everybody because I was so embarrassed and so shameful about it,” she says. “I don’t want people to know about it.”The last few years, the most she could accomplish was three months dry.“There was a lot of self-talk in my head: ‘You can pretend that you’re not going to be drinking, but in a few months from now, you’re going to have a drink for some reason.’”Three months passed, and she didn’t drink. She started focusing on her diet and doing yoga. She eventually found an addiction counsellor she liked. She scrambled to gather the artifacts from her life before she became a blackout drunk, hoping they’d show the court who she was and who she could become.We Are The Cops, extra: London police board responds READ IT HERE“I was crying every other minute: ‘Oh my God, I messed up.’ I was pulling up recommendation letters from professors and others, even one from my high school principal from five years ago . . . ‘Please prove I’m a good person.’ ”As winter passed and spring 2017 arrived, Emily was still not drinking.center_img And McLean was still trying to get full disclosure from the Crown.He or his agent appeared in court eight times between fall 2016 and spring 2017 trying to get the surveillance video.Just as it appeared he would succeed, in March 2017, he started feeling unwell.“Nausea, tiredness, fatigue, dizziness,” McLean recalls.His assistant at the time, Sandy Cody, recalls wondering about changes in his behaviour.He would lose his train of thought. “It’s like he would slip in and out. I didn’t know what was wrong,” Cody says.“Craig was always a gentleman. He never ever spoke crossly,” she says, but he began to lose his temper now and then, or get cross for no reason.“I thought he was having mini-strokes,” Cody says.In court, though, he remained sharp.“No one really realized he was experiencing a cognitive decline because he was really sharp and on point in court,” says lawyer Carolyn Conron, who shared an office with McLean and viewed him as a mentor.“He was very kind and soft-spoken, but very effective. He was very patient,” Conron recalls.“He never looked bothered by anything. He had all these major cases. He would wear robes a lot because he had Superior Court work . . . (and) it looked like he was gliding around, because he would walk at his own pace, like a legal ghost.”In tributes to him later, one colleague said McLean was “like a beautiful shark, quiet but potentially lethal.” Another explained his nickname, Hoover, by describing how McLean vacuumed up every detail of testimony and bit of information he could at trial.“That’s where Craig was at his best, in court. And I think that’s why Craig kept going to the courthouse. Come to work, go to court,” Cody says.In court on March 15, 2017, McLean was at his wry best, chuckling when he tried to explain again why surveillance video from the scene of his client’s alleged crime would be helpful. That day, the Crown finally agreed to his request.McLean laughs, recalling the fiery response his client had to his description of the video.“She was in my office just a-fuming. She was mad. I wanted her to look at it. She didn’t blow up, but she looked like she was going to,” he says.“I remember asking her, ‘Do you want to go after these guys? Do you want to sue them?’ She had no interest in doing that.”Charges against Emily were stayed on June 27, 2017. She had been living with the charges for 268 days. London police Sgt. Peter Paquette was charged with assaulting her.“I didn’t believe Craig saying, ‘This is all going to blow over and you don’t have to worry about a thing,’” she recalls. “I didn’t believe it because I had been such a horrible person to people. I felt like I deserved it because of everything I had done.”Conron represented Emily in court at her last hearing. McLean had been admitted to hospital, where surgeons removed several tumours from his brain.He disappeared from public view.Emily tried to do the same. She did not attend the court hearing at which the officer who assaulted her pleaded guilty.And when The Free Press tracked her down in 2018, she was reluctant to talk, at first.“I don’t want to stir up everything,” she said in her first interview. “I still feel so much guilt and shame over everything. I feel like I threw my own life away.”By then, she’d completed her university degree online, but had given up dreams of her chosen career.“I had my thesis and my master’s (degree) lined up years ago. I literally just tossed that away with all my friends. I lost all my friends.”She was taking courses at Fanshawe College to improve her chances of getting into a different master’s program.Twice since that first interview, she was accepted into programs but had to defer, because she hadn’t saved the roughly $30,000 she’d need for living expenses and a tuition not covered by OSAP. last_img read more

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South African para-cyclists shine at World Cup

first_img13 May 2014The South African Para-cycling team produced a series of top performances in the UCI World Cup in Castiglione, Italy on the weekend, highlighted by gold medals for Pieter du Preez and Justine Asher.Time trialA spectacular time trial route had the riders racing across a flat coastal foreland through Mediterranean coastal forest, with the smell of pine resin and the singing of a few early cicadas adding much to the ambience.The largely non-technical nature of the circuit proved deceptive in the way that it enticed the unwary rider to go out too fast and to not leave enough in reserve for the return section.GoldH1 hand-cyclist Pieter du Preez adapted to the challenges brilliantly to capture gold in his class. Ernst van Dyk picked up a silver medal in the H5 hand-cycling category, while George Rex added a bronze in the T1 tri-cycling class.While Justine Asher used the event to prepare for the following day’s road race, a number of other riders performed well: C3 cyclist Craig Ridgard, competing in his first international tour, finished respectably in the middle of his group; Stuart McCreadie finished fifth in the H3 category; and youngster Yusthin Lintnaar finished sixth, ahead of former Italian T2 world champion Giorgio Farroni.Road raceCompletely different to the time trial route in terms of a technical challenge, the route selected for the road race threaded its way through the narrow streets of Castiglione della Pescaia and the even narrower country roads extending out of town into the postcard landscape of olive groves and vineyards.As the first South African rider Stuart McCreadie discovered, the route made it extremely difficult to maintain a place in the lead group and he lost touch with it towards the end of the 65 km race. Nonetheless, he finished in a very competitive seventh place.George Rex, using lighter gears than in the time trial (to accelerate quickly out of the route’s myriad tight corners) improved on his previous day’s results by claiming a silver medal.His T2 tricycling teammate Lintnaar rode to a pre-set race plan, which worked perfectly and positioned him for a fourth place result after a sprint finish, one bike length behind Paralympian gold medallist David Stone, who finished third. The result was unfortunately later overturned when Lintnaar was disqualified for an infringement.HighlightA highlight performance of the day was Justine Asher’s gold medal win in the H2 category and the award to her of the World Cup champion’s jersey for her outstanding overall performance in the first leg of the season’s road race series.Pieter du Preez added a silver in his event to his time trial gold, while Ernst van Dyk picked up a bronze medal after a three-way sprint to the line to go with his silver in the time trial.SAinfo reporterlast_img read more

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Sensors, Smart Content, and the Future of News

first_imgRelated Posts Tags:#conferences#ETech 2009#Real World#web A Web Developer’s New Best Friend is the AI Wai… Nick Bilton from The New York Times R&D Labs was at ETech today, talking about how NYT is preparing for the future of news delivery. His presentation explored how “sensors in every part of our lives [are] helping us aggregate smart content that is relevant to the device we are using”. Bilton said that New York Times is building out more real-time analytics, device detection and granular user interaction, in order to deliver this “smart content” to each user and device. They are focused on the “3 screen” experience: web, mobile, and living room. Bilton said that NYT is also exploring “Newspaper 2.0” and next generation e-ink devices (such as flexible displays). Changes for mobile that NYT is looking at include optimizing for the increasing popularity of touch-screen devices (fueled by the iPhone) and adjusting content on mobile devices based on what the reader clicks on – e.g. if they click for sports news then they know the user is interested in that type of content. Regarding sensors, these devices can be editors according to Bilton. For example if your phone has GPS, then your location can influence what content you see. Or if you’re in your car, your phone could sense that and so NYT could deliver the news to you in audio. It can also change the way NYT does reporting – for example sensors that pick up noise activity could alert reporters to noise problems in NYC (a common problem in that city). Bilton said that NYT has also been experimenting with semacodes, bar codes in the newspaper – although he noted that it has issues, such as it not being understandable for many mainstream people. There are also e-ink and other interactive concepts being tested (example below).CustomTimes interactive newspaper box, photo from NickBilton.comBilton then showed how if NYT was being ‘consumed’ in the living room, they can introduce much more video and use sensor metadata to add to the experience (for example showing content based on location). He also asked the question: why doesn’t my couch have an API? If NYT knew more about the people in the room, how close they are to the TV, etc, then NYT could customize the user interface and content even further.He wrapped up by addressing the so-called death of the newspaper. Bilton argued that “paper is just a device”. He noted that the next generation will be used to accessing content immediately – there will be flexible displays, full immersive video and graphical experiences, more user-generated content. All of these things are just ways of storytelling, he said.Based on this fascinating presentation, we can be sure that newspapers – at least ones with enough money to do this type of research – are far from dead if they evolve with and adapt quickly to technology. NYT is certainly one of the leaders in using technology in news reporting, so it appears to be well positioned.Disclosure: RWW has a syndication relationship with NYT. Why Tech Companies Need Simpler Terms of Servic…center_img richard macmanus Top Reasons to Go With Managed WordPress Hosting 8 Best WordPress Hosting Solutions on the Marketlast_img read more

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A Non-Veteran’s View of Veteran’s Day and How I Almost Became One

first_imgPhoto by Jno. P. Trlica circa 1932I started college at age 17 in 1969 in the midst of the Vietnam War. I turned 18 my first semester and signed up for the draft as required by law. I don’t recall when the draft lottery was held but certainly recall my birthday drawn at number 33. Because I was married and in college, I was deferred until finishing school.Fast forward to the spring of my senior year 1973, I received my notice to report on a particular Monday in April. I went home that weekend prior to visit my parents. As was our habit, my Dad and I were sitting in front of the TV watching Saturday afternoon baseball when a news bulletin interrupted the game. It was President Nixon who told the nation, “I am immediately ending the draft.” I’m sure he said much more, but that’s all I recall.Monday morning I reported to the federal courthouse in Austin at 6:00 a.m. as instructed to find a hand-written note on the door that simply said, “By Presidential Order You Do Not Have to Report.”- Sponsor – Between 1969 and 1973 I had changed tremendously in my politics and view of the war. The tragedy at Kent State was a watershed event for me. I left Texas A&M and its ROTC culture to finish my degree at the University of Texas at Austin.Had that Presidential Order been delayed a week, I would have been inducted. I’m not sure what kind of soldier I would have been, but my personality likely would have made me follow orders and do my best. Had I gone to Vietnam, I don’t know if I would have been one of those second lieutenants who didn’t survive the jungle or pushed paper in an office behind the lines. It is interesting to reflect these 46 years later.Armistice Day was first celebrated on November 11, 1919, to honor the terrible sacrifice of soldiers in WWI. Officially renamed Veteran’s Day in 1954, when this day comes around each year, I often think about my near miss. But mostly I think about the family and friends who did go to war or are currently in the military.My father’s youngest brother Raymond who was a medic in the Pacific during WWII.My father-in-law Sam Holder who was a Marine also in the Pacific theater.Jim Lee’s brother and stepfather both in the Army in Vietnam.One of my best friends in the loss prevention industry Jim “Mac” MacKenzie who was a Marine in Vietnam.Another LP friend Melissa Mitchell who served—and sang—in the Air Force.Our close Charlotte friends’ son Evan who grew up playing army with our kids and is now a major in the US Army Special Forces.I could list many more friends from high school and the LP industry, but that’s not the point. Here’s my point on this day:No matter whether you are a veteran or not. No matter your politics or what you think about war. One thing we all should be able to do at least one day a year is feel gratitude and pride for those who served in the military in whatever capacity to support our democracy and take up arms to protect our country. Without individuals willing to put their lives on the line for the greater good, the United States and free countries everywhere would not enjoy the freedoms and liberties we are blessed with today.Enjoy this Veteran’s Day, but please take a minute to think about someone you know who served in the military. You don’t need to wave a tiny flag to show your appreciation. Simply note it in your heart and mind while you take a deep breath of freedom. Stay UpdatedGet critical information for loss prevention professionals, security and retail management delivered right to your inbox.  Sign up nowlast_img read more

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